Course List


Please note that this page displays course descriptions that may not yet be in effect. To verify the current prerequisites, credit hours, and descriptions of the courses, please visit my.spcollege.edu and select "Search for Classes".

<< Prefix Definitions


A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
W
Z



A

ACG 2001   APPLIED FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING I

credits: 3  
This course is a study of basic accounting principles including the recording and reporting of financial activity. It includes the preparation and interpretation of financial statements for a sole proprietorship or corporation. It emphasizes an applied approach with computer applications to the study of financial accounting. 47 contact hours.

ACG 2021   FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

credits: 3  
This course is a study of basic accounting principles including the recording and reporting of financial activity. The preparation and interpretation of financial statements with emphasis on the corporation is also studied. 47 contact hours.

ACG 2071   MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: ACG 2021. This course is a study of product costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, budgetary planning and control, the statement of cash flows and financial statement analysis. Emphasis will be placed on applications in order to illustrate the accounting principles. 47 contact hours.

ACG 2450   ACCOUNTING SOFTWARE APPLICATIONS

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: ACG 2021 and CGS 1100 or permission of program administrator. This course offers an overview of accounting software applications in business organizations. The student will progressively work through accounting cycles for service and merchandising businesses using popular accounting software. Specific applications will include design and setup of an accounting information system for a new company, recording transactions, and creation as well as analysis of various reports and financial statements. Transactional and reporting areas will include banking, customers, sales, vendors, purchases, inventory, employees, and payroll. The course is taught using QuickBooks Pro accounting software and focuses on small to medium-sized business organizations. 47 contact hours.

ACG 2940   ACCOUNTING INTERNSHIP

credits: 1-3  

Prerequisite: Approval of the College-wide Internship Office. This course provides the student with a supervised, practical learning experience in a work setting that is relevant to his/her program of study. Through course assignments and workplace projects the student will apply, connect, and extend academic theory and competencies for the purpose of building professional skills and affiliations. (60-180 contact hours).

ACG 3103   INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I

credits: 3  
Prerequisites: ACG 2071 and (admission to the Accounting AS or Business Administration BS program). This course emphasizes the theoretical aspects and frameworks of financial accounting. Topics include financial statements preparation, revenue recognition, present value of investments, and the study of assets. The assets component focuses on current assets such as cash, receivables, and inventories. 47 contact hours.

ACG 3113   INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: ACG 3103 and Admission into BS Business Administration program. This course is a continuation of Intermediate Accounting I. The topics included are tangible and intangible assets, investments, current liabilities and contingencies, bonds and long term debt, shareholder’s equity, and earnings per share. This course will also help the student prepare for the CPA exam: 47 contact hours

AMH 1091   AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY

credits: 3  

"G" Prerequisite: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017) or EAP 1695 or satisfactory score on the SPC placement test. This course examines the development of the black presence in America. The concern will be to study the economic, social and psychological factors that led to slavery, the practical consequences of slavery on black and white social groups, the events and individuals who contributed to the elimination of slavery, the struggle for citizenship and self-worth, the artistic contributions, the social justice movement of the 1970s, and the current social condition defining black experience in America. This course partially satisfies the Gordon Rule writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. 47 contact hours.

AMH 2010   HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES I

credits: 3  

"G" Prerequisite: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017) or EAP 1695 or an appropriate score on the placement test. This course addresses history in the land that becomes the United States of America, beginning with the migration of the Western Hemisphere’s original inhabitants. It briefly surveys the pre-Columbian Native American cultures. It also examines the impacts of the European “discovery” and settlement of North America on various groups of Native Americans, on Europeans at home and in the colonies, and on Africans forced into slavery in the New World. The course emphasizes the political, economic, social, cultural and religious aspects of life in the English North American colonies through their evolution into the United States, from the country’s developmental years through the end of the Civil War. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. Credit is only given for AMH 2010 or AMH 2010H or IDS 2103H. 47 contact hours.

AMH 2010H   HONORS HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES I

credits: 3  
"G" Prerequisite: Appropriate score on the CPT or acceptance into the Honors College or permission of the Dean. This advanced course addresses history in the land that becomes the United States of America, beginning with the migration of the Western Hemisphere’s original inhabitants. It examines the pre-Columbian Native American cultures. It also examines the impacts of the European “discovery” and settlement of North America on various groups of Native Americans, on Europeans at home and in the colonies, and on Africans forced into slavery in the New World. The course will emphasize the evaluation and synthesis of the political, economic, social, cultural and religious aspects of life in the English North American colonies through their evolution into the United States, from the country’s developmental years through the end of the Civil War. This course also analyzes methods of qualitative and quantitative research, cases studies, archival retrieval, and comparative approaches to the study of societies and emphasizes writing research-based papers, historiography and critical analysis. Independent research and interdisciplinary connections will also be encouraged for students to make connections to other related areas of humanities, philosophy and literature in the Honors Program. This advanced course will have a substantial writing assignment. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. Credit will only be given for AMH 2010 or AMH 2010H or IDS 2103H. 47 contact hours.

AMH 2020   HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES II

credits: 3  

"G" Prerequisite: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017) or (EAP 1695) or an appropriate score on the placement test. This course covers the history of the United States from the post-Civil War period (1865) to the present. Emphasis is placed on the social, economic, political and diplomatic history. The course is designed to present history as a dynamic process, encouraging students to think historically and to encourage students to value history. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education requirements. Credit is only given for AMH 2020 or AMH 2020H or IDS 1102H. 47 contact hours.

AMH 2020H   HONORS HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES II

credits: 3  
"G" Prerequisite: Appropriate score on the CPT or acceptance into the Honors College or permission of the Dean. This advanced course covers the history of the United States from the post-Civil War period (1865) to the present. The course will present history as a dynamic process, and students will evaluate and synthesize the social, economic, political, and diplomatic history of the post-Civil War period. This course also analyzes methods of qualitative and quantitative research, case studies, archival retrieval, and comparative approaches to the study of societies and emphasizes writing research-based papers, historiography and critical analysis. Independent research and interdisciplinary connections will also be encouraged for students to make connections to other related areas of humanities, philosophy and literature in the Honors Program. This course will have a substantial writing requirement. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. Credit is only given for AMH 2020 or AMH 2020H or IDS 1102H. 47 contact hours.

AMH 2070   FLORIDA HISTORY

credits: 3  
This course outlines chronologically the economic, social, geographic, and political background of Florida from the time of discovery through settlement, colonization and statehood. Florida's role in the Civil War and Reconstruction Period is reviewed, and the state's agricultural development into the 20th century is described. Current issues including the impact of urbanization, tourism, and industrialization are emphasized. 47 contact hours.

AML 1600   AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: (ENC 1101 or ENC 1121H or IDS 1101H). This course is designed to survey the major fiction, poetry, drama, and essays of selected African-American writers through the twenty-first century. It emphasizes issues and ideas that have influenced African-American literary expression and explores personal responses to the African-American experience as reflected in American culture. It examines African-American literature through four periods: Slavery, The Civil War and Reconstruction, The Harlem Renaissance, and the Contemporary Period. It traces human experiences as they unfold in African-American literature and American culture, while also exploring the historical background, social issues, and diverse ideologies of each period. This course requires substantial reading, library research, and the composition of the research paper. 47 contact hours.

AML 2001   INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN FOLKLORE

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: ENC 0025 or EAP 1695 or a satisfactory score on the SPC placement test. A survey of the major aspects of American folklore. This course is designed to increase the student's general knowledge of folklore in the United States; to familiarize the student with major techniques for collecting, editing, and evaluating folklore; to familiarize the student with major scholarship in the field; and to develop within the student a sense of appreciation of folklore. This course has a substantial writing requirement. 47 contact hours.

AML 2010   AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 1865

credits: 3  

"G" Prerequisite: (IDS 1101H or ENC 1101 or ENC 1121H) and (REA 0017 or EAP 1695) or appropriate score on the placement test. This is a course designed to survey American literature to 1865, with special emphasis on Romanticism and Realism as well as methods of library research, writing of the research paper and the paper of literary interpretation. Included are selected works of major writers such as Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Walt Whitman, and Emily Dickinson. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements as outlined in the General Education Requirements. Credit is not given for both AML 2010 and AML 2010H. 47 contact hours.

AML 2010H   HONORS AMERICAN LITERATURE I

credits: 3  

"G" Prerequisites: (ENC 1101 and appropriate score on the SPC placement test) or ENC 1121H or IDS 1101H or IDS 1111H or approval of the dean. This course is designed to be a humanistic and interdisciplinary study of American literature from its origins in the 17th Century through the 19th Century. Special emphasis will be given to the literary movements of 19th Century Romanticism and Realism. Representative selections from each period are critically examined for interpretation, historical background, artistic qualities, and philosophy, with emphasis on human values and application to life. This course also stresses methods of research and emphasizes writing research-based papers, including literary interpretation and critical analysis. Independent research and interdisciplinary connections will also be encouraged for students to make connections to other related areas of humanities, philosophy and literature in the Honors Program. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. Credit is not given for both AML 2010H and AML 2010. 47 contact hours.

AML 2020   AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM 1865 TO PRESENT

credits: 3  

"G" Prerequisite: (IDS 1101H or ENC 1101 or ENC 1121H) and (REA 0017 or EAP 1695) or appropriate score on the placement test. This is a course designed to survey American literature from 1865 to the present. Included are selected works of major writers such as Mark Twain, Stephen Crane, Henry James, Robert Frost, Carl Sandburg, T. S. Eliot, E. E. Cummings, F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, Norman Mailer, Bernard Malamud, Flannery O'Connor, James Baldwin, James Dickey, and Sylvia Plath. This course also stresses methods of library research and emphasizes writing of the research paper and the paper of literary interpretation. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. American Literature to 1865 is not necessarily a prerequisite to this course. Credit is not given for both AML 2020 and AML 2020H. 47 contact hours.

ANS 3006   INTRODUCTION TO ANIMAL SCIENCE

credits: 3  

Prerequisite(s): PCB 3063C. This course provides an overview of the discipline of livestock production. The course covers the fundamentals of animal science, including nutrition, feeds, genetics, reproduction, healthcare and management of major and minor species. The agricultural industries of animal production will also be explored. 47 contact hours.

ANT 2000   INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY

credits: 3  

"G" Prerequisite: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017) or EAP 1695 or satisfactory score on the SPC placement test. This course is an introduction to the science of man and his culture, defining the branches of anthropology, its methods, and its relation and contributions to the other disciplines. Emphasis will be given to the universal and the unique aspects of man's adaptation to his environment and to his biological origins. This course partially satisfies the Gordon Rule writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. 47 contact hours.

ANT 2003   SURVEY OF ANTHROPOLOGY

credits: 3  

"G" Prerequisite: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017) or EAP 1695 or satisfactory score on the SPC placement test. This course is a survey of the broad field of Anthropology and an explanation of selected contemporary problems. The origin of these problems and alternate solutions, derived from a cross-cultural approach, will be considered. This course partially satisfies the Gordon Rule writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. 47 contact hours.

ANT 2410   CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: {(ENC 0025/0020 or ENC 0990) and( REA 0017/0002 or REA 0990)}or EAP 1695 or satisfactory score on the SPC placement test. This course is the study of the influence of culture on human behavior. The course deals with cultural variations and similarities in the areas of subsistence techniques and technology, family and kinship, social order and disorder, and world view. This course partially satisfies the Gordon Rule writing requirement outlined in the General Education Requirements. 47 contact hours.

 

ARC 1126C   ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING I

credits: 3  
An introductory drafting course oriented toward students entering the career areas of building design and/or construction. 6 class and laboratory hours weekly.

ARC 1301   ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN I

credits: 4  
An introductory course interfacing communication skills with design thinking. Emphasis is on the awareness and understanding of basic organization ideas in design. 122 contact hours.

ARC 1302   ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN II

credits: 4  
Prerequisite: ARC 1301. An analysis course that uses the study of architectural precedent as a foundation for the development of communication and design skills. 122 contact hours.

ARC 1701   ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY I

credits: 3  
This course is a general survey of social, political and cultural factors which have generated art and architecture from prehistoric times through the Baroque and Rococo periods. Instruction also includes drawings and sketches of major buildings. An annotated sketchbook will be required. 47 contact hours.

ARC 1702   ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY II

credits: 3  

This course is a general survey of the social, political and cultural factors which have generated art and architecture from the Age of Enlightenment to the present. The elements of architecture, described by Vitruvius as Function, Strength and Aesthetics, will be analyzed in significant buildings from the Age of Enlightenment to the current works by contemporary architects. Instruction also includes drawings and sketches of major buildings. An annotated sketchbook will be required. 47 contact hours.

ARC 2180C   INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL DESIGN AND FABRICATION

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: ETD 1320C or permission of program director. This is an introductory course interfacing digital design and communication tools with design thinking and hands on production. Emphasis is on the use of digital technology to facilitate expansion of basic engineering and architectural design modalities, and laying a foundation for the full integration of digital technologies into the design studio. 47 contact hours.

ARC 2201   ARCHITECTURAL THEORY I

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: ARC 1701 and ARC 2303. This course is a theoretical exploration into the meaning and goals of architecture; an investigation of the creative process of design. 47 contact hours.

ARC 2303   ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN III

credits: 4  
Prerequisite: ARC 1302. This course is an introduction to the forces, both physical and perceptual, which determine the varied environments which man creates, or otherwise alters. Emphasis will be placed on (1) becoming aware of the forces which contribute to the environment; (2) gathering and organizing data supporting the existence of these forces; and (3) discovering means to communicate these findings. 122 contact hours.

ARC 2304   ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN IV

credits: 4  

Prerequisites: ARC 2303 with a grade of C.  A personal interview and a review of the student's portfolio and academic record by an architecture faculty committee is required for admission to this course. This course is a continuation of Architectural Design III, basic studies in perception of the components of architecture. This course has a substantial writing requirement. 122 contact hours.

ARC 2461   MATERIALS AND METHODS OF CONSTRUCTION I

credits: 3  
This course is an introduction to materials and methods used in wood frame, masonry, concrete and steel construction. Laboratory work will consist of "hands on" experience and field trips to construction sites. 92 contact hours.

ARC 2501   ARCHITECTURAL STRUCTURES I

credits: 4  
Prerequisites: ARC 2303. This course is a study of basic principles of static mechanics and strength of materials relating to the design, investigation, and behavior of structural elements and systems of buildings. 62 contact hours. This course has a substantial writing requirement.

ARH 1000   UNDERSTANDING ART

credits: 3  

"G" Prerequisite: ENC 0025 or EAP 1695 or appropriate score on the CPT. This is a beginning course for any student curious about art and why it looks the way it does. Students will explore a variety of visual experiences in relationship to their seeing, feeling, thinking, and self. They will examine, discuss, and handle two- and three-dimensional media. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. 47 contact hours.

ARH 2050   ART HISTORY: ANCIENT TO GOTHIC

credits: 3  

"G" Prerequisite: ENC 0025 or EAP 1695 or appropriate score on the CPT. This course is a study of the origin and development of painting, sculpture, architecture, and significant crafts from prehistoric times to the Gothic period. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. 47 contact hours.

ARH 2051   ART HISTORY: RENAISSANCE TO CONTEMPORARY

credits: 3  

"G" Prerequisite: ENC 0025 or EAP 1695 or satisfactory score on the CPT. This course is a study of the development of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. 47 contact hours.

ART 1201C   DESIGN I

credits: 3  

A foundation course developing knowledge and perception of two-dimensional form and its elements. An introduction to basic design concepts, skills, and processes necessary for all art careers. 92 contact hours. 3 credits.

ART 1203C   DESIGN II

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: ART 1201C. This is a foundation course developing knowledge and perception of three-dimensional form and its elements.  An expansion of design skills, processes and concepts of design necessary for all art careers is discussed. 92 contact hours.

ART 1300C   DRAWING I

credits: 3  
This course is an introduction to basic drawing skills, concepts and processes through a structured learning situation. Various media are used. Course may be taken up to three times for credit. 92 contact hours.

ART 1330C   DRAWING II

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: ART 1300C. This course is an in-depth study of drawing with an emphasis upon classical drawing ideals and techniques as they pertain to the depiction of the human figure and organic form. Course may be taken up to three times for credit. 92 contact hours.

ART 1701C   SCULPTURE I

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: ART 1203C or approval of program administrator. This course covers the problems and techniques of applied three-dimensional design with an emphasis on the use of materials and tools. Students will be introduced to the basic methods of casting, carving, modeling, and assemblage. The creative aspects of the sculptural process will be emphasized by broadening the student’s concept development and sensitizing the student to the materials and techniques involved in the sculptural process. Students will become familiar with the basic vocabulary associated with sculpture. Students will discuss and apply issues of contemporary critical art theory within the context of their project work. Course may be taken up to three times for credit. 92 contact hours.

ART 1750C   CERAMICS I

credits: 3  
This course presents the basic concepts of ceramic design, as well as the various methods of construction and firing pieces. Course may be taken up to three times for credit. 92 contact hours.

ART 1751C   CERAMICS II

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: ART 1750C or permission of program administrator. This course is an extension of ART 1750C. This course addresses advanced throwing techniques, creative handbuilding, glaze formulation, and firing processes. Course may be taken up to 3 times for credit. 92 contact hours.

ART 2370   DRAWING FOR ANIMATION

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: ART 1300C. Recommended: ART 1201C and ART 1330C. This course is designed to develop the drawing skills that are most essential for effective animation. Life drawings accompanied by a study of structural anatomy in both humans and animals will be the emphasis of the course curriculum. Additional topics will include sequential drawing, the role of exaggeration and simplification in character development, composition of scenic elements as related to the development of mood and context, and the development of a smooth animated sequence. 47 contact hours. 3 credits.

ART 2400C   PRINTMAKING I

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: ART 1300C. This course is an exploration of figure/ground theory as related to 2D visual design and picture making. Basic skills in relief printing (linocut, woodcut, collograph, etc.) will be explored. Also included will be painterly processes such as monoprints. Course may be taken up to three times for credit. 92 contact hours.

ART 2500C   PAINTING I

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: ART 1201C and ART 1300C. This course is an introduction to the materials, techniques and concepts of painting through a structured learning situation. Course may be taken up to three times for credit. 92 contact hours.

ART 2501C   PAINTING II

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: ART 2500C. This course is a continuation of Painting I with an emphasis on individual development. Course may be taken up to three times for credit. 92 contact hours.

ART 2940   VISUAL ARTS INTERNSHIP

credits: 1-3  

Prerequisite:Approval of the College-wide Internship Office. This course provides the student with a supervised, practical learning experience in a work setting that is relevant to his/her program of study. Through course assignments and workplace projects the student will apply, connect, and extend academic theory and competencies for the purpose of building professional skills and affiliations. (60-180 contact hours). 

ART 2949   CO-OP WORK EXPERIENCE

credits: 1-3  

Prerequisite: Faculty Advisor/Co-op Coordinator or Program Administrator Approval. This course is designed to provide students with major-related, supervised, evaluated practical training work experiences which may be paid or voluntary. Students are graded on the basis of documented learning acquired through hands-on experiences in an actual work setting.  Variable credits are available, one to three per course. The student must fulfill the requirement of 60 on-the-job hours for each credit earned in addition to written assignments. Co-op courses may be repeated but total credits shall not exceed twelve.

ASL 1140C   BASIC AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE WITH LAB

credits: 4  
This course is an introduction to American Sign Language (ASL) as used in the deaf community, and includes a general discussion of ASL structure with an introduction to a variety of manual communication systems and philosophies. Emphasis will be on building a basic vocabulary of approximately five hundred signs and the manual alphabet. Students will have directed practice with media-generated materials, emphasizing the development of beginning-level receptive and expressive conversational practice. Lecture - 47 contact hours. Lab - 30 contact hours.

ASL 1150C   INTERMEDIATE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE WITH LAB

credits: 4  
Prerequisite: ASL 1140C. This course is a continuation of the basic American Sign Language course and expands the student's vocabulary and signing fluency. Students will have directed practice with media generated materials, emphasizing receptive and expressive conversational practice. Lecture - 47 contact hours. Lab – 30 contact hours.

ASL 1160C   ADVANCED AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE WITH LAB

credits: 4  

Prerequisites: ASL 1150C and ASL 1510 with grades of "C" or better and (ENC 0025 and REA 0017 or EAP 1695) or appropriate score on the SPC Placement Test and departmental approval). Pre- or corequisite: ASL 1430 with grade of "C" or better. This course is a continuation of Intermediate American Sign Language designed to develop expressive and receptive signing skills to an advanced level. Included are compound/complex sentences, inflectional signs, tense and time, sign modulations, and classifiers. Discussion may also include cultural issues and optional professional careers in deafness. Lecture 47 contact hours. Lab 30 contact hours.

ASL 1300   STRUCTURE OF AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: ASL 1510 and ASL 1160C  with grades of “C” or better. This course is for the intermediate or advanced signer with limited exposure to American Sign Language (ASL). American Sign Language, as used by deaf adults, is studied with an emphasis on the phonological, morphological, semantic, syntactical, idiomatic and metaphorical aspects of ASL. Current research in the field is examined and discussed. 47 contact hours.

ASL 1430   FINGERSPELLING

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: ASL 1140C with grade of "C" or better. Pre- or corequisite: ASL 1510 with grade of "C" or better. This course introduces students to fingerspelling and numbers in ASL. The course covers topics such as techniques and forms of fingerspelling, when people fingerspell and how they use fingerspelling to meet their needs. It also includes numerical systems in American Sign Language (ASL). Emphasis on both receptive and expressive development. 32 contact hours.

ASL 1510   INTRODUCTION TO DEAF CULTURE

credits: 3  
This course is an introduction and orientation to the educational, communicative, social, vocational, psychological and legal aspects of deafness. The course will deal with the impact of deafness on the individual and the family, as well as social patterns of the deaf community. In addition, it will describe historical and changing attitudes toward the culture of deaf persons and other groups of handicapped persons. 47 contact hours.

ASL 2210C   AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE IV WITH LAB

credits: 4  

Prerequisite: ASL 1160C and ASL 1510 (with grades of “C” or better) and (ENC 0025 and REA 0017 or EAP 1695 or appropriate score on the SPC Placement Test) and departmental approval. This course is a continuation of Advanced American Sign Language (ASL) designed to focus on the development of mastery and advanced conversational American Sign Language skills. This course will emphasize receptive and expressive discourse with ASL users, focus on non-manual signals, complex grammatical constructions, and idiomatic expressions. 62 contact hours.

AST 1002   UNIVERSE: THE INFINITE FRONTIER

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017 and MAT 0028) or (EAP 1695 and MAT 0028). This course is a survey of astronomy that includes an introduction to the characteristics, origin, and evolution of the solar system, our sun and other stars, the Milky Way galaxy, other galaxies, and the Universe. It will include a consideration and perspective from the time of ancient astronomers to that developed from the latest astronomical research and theories. (This course may not be taken for credit subsequent to receiving a grade of "C" or better in any course with an AST prefix.) 47 contact hours.

AST 1003   THE SOLAR SYSTEM

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017 and MAT 0028) or (EAP 1695 and MAT 0028). This course is a study of earth as a planet, the moon, and the sun, measurement of time, eclipses, planets and their satellites, comets, meteors, and various theories of the origin of the solar system. Consideration will be given to the historical development of the science and the basic principles of mechanics as applied to astronomy. (This course may not be taken for credit subsequent to receiving a grade of "C" or better in AST 1002.) 47 contact hours.

AST 1022L   OBSERVATIONAL ASTRONOMY LABORATORY

credits: 1  
Pre- or corequisite: AST 1002 or AST 1003 or AST 1004. This is a laboratory course to provide those experiences in observation needed by the beginning astronomy student and the interested amateur. Topics will include astronomical coordinate systems, characteristics of telescopes, telescopic observation of celestial objects, astrophotography, and applications of desktop planetarium software. 45 contact hours.

ATE 1110   ANIMAL ANATOMY

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Admission to the Veterinary Technology AS program. Corequisite: ATE 1110L. This course will teach the fundamentals of anatomy of domestic animals, especially the canine, with emphasis on locating and identifying the anatomical regions and landmarks. Introduction to descriptive and topographical terms to aid the student in communicating with the professional staff. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 1110L   ANIMAL ANATOMY LABORATORY

credits: 1  
Prerequisite: Admission to the Veterinary Technology AS Program. Corequisite: ATE 1110. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the fundamental techniques involved in anatomic dissection as well as necropsy procedures. This laboratory will correlate with lecture material learned in Animal Anatomy and will help to visualize these concepts. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 1211   ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: Admission to the Veterinary Technology AS program and ATE 1110 and ATE 1110L, both with a grade of "C" or higher. This course is designed to acquaint the student with physiology of the domestic animal species. The course emphasizes the differences between the systems of domestic animals. Aspects of physiology relating to the pathogenesis of certain diseases will also be discussed. 47 contact hours.

ATE 1301   BASICS OF VETERINARY MANAGEMENT

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017 and MAT 0028) or (EAP 1695 and MAT 0028) or appropriate scores on the SPC Placement Test.  This course will guide the student in an overview of the components necessary to manage any veterinary hospital. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 1302   LEGAL ISSUES FOR THE VETERINARY HOSPITAL

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017 and MAT 0028) or (EAP 1695 and MAT 0028) or appropriate scores on the SPC Placement Test. This course will guide the student in the study of legal issues with an emphasis on the legal aspects of veterinary hospitals. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 1303   MARKETING FOR THE VETERINARY HOSPITAL

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017 and MAT 0028) or (EAP 1695 and MAT 0028) or appropriate scores on the SPC Placement Test. This course will help the student to plan, organize, direct and evaluate marketing programs for a small business with an emphasis on the veterinary hospital. It will give the student a basic understanding of the marketing aspects of veterinary practices. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 1304   VETERINARY FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017 and MAT 0028) or (EAP 1695 and MAT 0028) or appropriate scores on the SPC Placement Test. This course will guide the student in the study of veterinary financial accounting with an emphasis on measuring, communicating and interpreting financial activity in the veterinary hospital with an emphasis on managing cash flow and planning. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 1311L   VETERINARY OFFICE PROCEDURES

credits: 1  

Prerequisite: MAT 1033 with a minimum grade of "C" or MAT 1100 or any three-credit course with MGF, MAC or STA prefix with a minimum grade of "C" and admission to the Veterinary Technology AS program. This course is designed to acquaint the student with mathematics and office procedures used in veterinary hospital management and veterinary computer applications. 47 contact hours.

ATE 1364   LEADERSHIP IN THE VETERINARY OFFICE

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017 and MAT 0028) or (EAP 1695 and MAT 0028) or appropriate scores on the SPC Placement Test. This course focuses on the development of leadership skills. It provides a basic understanding of leadership and group dynamics theory and will assist the student in developing a personal philosophy of leadership and an awareness of the moral and ethical responsibilities of leadership. Topics include decision making, leadership ethics, goal formation, building trust, empowering others, conflict resolution, and managing organizational change. The course will integrate readings from contemporary multi-cultural writing and experiential learning exercises with current leadership theories and practices. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 1636   LARGE ANIMAL CLINICAL AND NURSING SKILLS

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: Admission to the Veterinary Technology program. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the fundamentals of farm animal herd health management, reproductive physiology, and lactation physiology. Aspects of farm animal husbandry will be discussed. 32 contact hours.

ATE 1650L   VETERINARY CLINICAL PRACTICE LAB I

credits: 1  

Prerequisites: Admission to the Veterinary Technology A.S. program. This course is designed to acquaint the student with basic laboratory and nursing skills, including restraint, history taking, examination room techniques, administration of medication, basic parasitology, and basic clinical pathology procedures. 15 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 1654L   VETERINARY CLINICAL PRACTICE LAB II

credits: 1  

Prerequisites: ATE 1650L with a grade of "C" or higher and ATE 1110 with a grade of "C" or higher. Corequisite: ATE 1944 with a minimum grade of “C”.  This course is designed to acquaint the student with basic skills in radiology and surgical nursing. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 1671L   LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE

credits: 1  

Prerequisite: ATE 2651L with a minimum grade of "C." This course is a study of the technical clinical aspects of laboratory animal care, including restraint and handling, common diseases, and nutrition of common laboratory species. 47 contact hours.

ATE 1741   VETERINARY MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

credits: 1  

Prerequisites: Admission to the Veterinary Technology A.S. program. This course is an introduction to medical terminology and veterinary terminology. Included is an introduction to the foundation of veterinary and medical language such as word roots, prefixes, suffixes, and combining forms. 16 contact hours.

ATE 1943   VETERINARY WORK PRACTICUM I

credits: 1  

Pre or Corequisite ATE 1650L with a minimum grade of “C” and Admission to the Veterinary Technology A.S. program. This course consists of supervised clinical experience in a work place approved by the instructor. A minimum of 64 hours in a full service veterinary clinic is required. 64 contact hours.

ATE 1944   VETERINARY WORK PRACTICUM II

credits: 1  

Prerequisite: ATE 1943 with a grade of "C" or higher. Pre or corequisite ATE 1654L with a minimum grade of “C.” This course consists of supervised clinical experience in a workplace approved by the instructor. A minimum of 64 hours in an approved workplace is required. 64 contact hours.

ATE 2050C   SMALL ANIMAL BREEDS AND BEHAVIOR

credits: 1  
Prerequisite: Admission to the Veterinary Technology AS program. This is a lecture/lab course on normal canine and feline behavior, obedience training and feline training. Discussion topics will include normal canine and feline behavior and causes of behavior problems in dogs and cats. The student will train a dog and a cat, will discuss or apply corrections for common behavioral problems, and will learn about the different canine and feline breeds. 32 contact hours.

ATE 2349   VETERINARY HOSPITAL OPERATIONS

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017 and MAT 0028 or (EAP 1695 and MAT 0028) or appropriate scores on the SPC Placement Test. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of best practices in veterinary hospital operations. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 2501C   PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR

credits: 1  
Prerequisite: Admission to the Veterinary Technology AS program. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the laws and the agencies governing the care, use, and movement of animals and livestock. The course also includes veterinary issues, resume writing, and effective job seeking techniques. 32 contact hours.

ATE 2611   ANIMAL ANESTHESIA

credits: 3  

Pre- or corequisite: ATE 1211 with a minimum grade of “C.” This is a course designed to acquaint the student with common surgical procedures, anesthesiology, asepsis, surgical instrument identification and care, veterinary dentistry, obstetrics, and pediatric care for companion animals. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 2612   ANIMAL MEDICINE

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: ATE 1211 with a minimum grade of “C.” The course topics include immunity, disease prevention, common vaccinations and diseases, physical therapy, oxygen and fluid therapy, obstetrics and pediatric care, and veterinary dentistry in companion animals. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 2631   ANIMAL NURSING

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: Admission to the Veterinary Technology A.S. program. This course is a study of the technical skills of hospital maintenance and disinfection, general patient care, clinical nutrition, medicating animals, exam room techniques, diagnostic imaging including radiography, ultrasonography and endoscopy, zoonotic diseases, and human health hazards associated with veterinary medicine. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 2634   ANIMAL PHARMACOLOGY

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: ATE 1211 with a minimum grade of “C.” This course is a study of the principles and practices related to veterinary pharmacology. Lecture topics will include a review of veterinary pharmacology and pharmacokinetics. Emphasis is on the application of the principles of pharmacology. 47 contact hours.

ATE 2638   ANIMAL LABORATORY PROCEDURES I

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Any College-level BSC or ZOO with a minimum grade of “C,” ATE 1211 with a minimum grade of “C.” Corequisite: ATE 2638L. This lecture course is designed to introduce the veterinary technician student to common parasites and their life cycles seen in routine veterinary practice. Hematology and the kinetics of the hematopoietic system are discussed with emphasis on normal blood smears and common changes seen during disease states of domestic animals. 47 contact hours.

ATE 2638L   ANIMAL LABORATORY PROCEDURE LABORATORY

credits: 2  
Corequisite: ATE 2638. This course is for the reinforcement and application of laboratory procedures and principles taught in Animal Laboratory Procedures. 90 contact hours.

ATE 2639   ANIMAL LABORATORY PROCEDURES II

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: ATE 2638 with a minimum grade of “C.” Corequisite: ATE 2639L. This lecture course serves as a continuation of Animal Lab Procedures I and covers topics of immunology, organ function and diagnostic testing. Additional topics include normal and abnormal exfoliative cytology, veterinary microbiology, and the evaluation of endocrine disorders. 47 contact hours.

ATE 2639L   ANIMAL LABORATORY PROCEDURES LAB II

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: ATE 2638L with a minimum grade of “C.” Corequisite: ATE 2639. This course provides experience in the clinical application of the techniques discussed in Animal Laboratory Procedures II in the areas of immunology, clinical chemistry, cytology, veterinary microbiology, coagulation testing, and abnormal and comparative hematology. 92 contact hours.

ATE 2651L   ANIMAL NURSING AND MEDICINE LABORATORY I

credits: 2  
Prerequisites: ATE 1654L with a minimum grade of “C,” ATE 1311L with minimum grade of “C,” ATE 1211 with minimum grade of “C.” Pre- or corequisites: ATE 2611 with a minimum grade of “C,” ATE 2631 with a minimum grade of “C.” This course is designed to acquaint the student with laboratory procedures, exam room techniques, anesthesia, and principles of radiology practices utilized in veterinary hospitals. 92 contact hours.

ATE 2653L   ANIMAL NURSING AND MEDICINE LABORATORY II

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: ATE 2651L with a minimum grade of “C.” This course is a continuation of Animal Nursing and Medicine Laboratory I. Skills will be developed in veterinary anesthesia, animal nursing care, and veterinary radiology procedures. 92 contact hours.

ATE 2656L   LARGE ANIMAL CLINICAL AND NURSING SKILLS LAB

credits: 1  
Pre- or corequisite: ATE 1636 with a minimum grade of “C.” This course is designed to acquaint the student with the fundamentals of large animal husbandry, herd health management, preventive medicine, animal restraint and nutrition as it relates to the bovine, equine, porcine, and caprine species. 47 contact hours.

ATE 2661   LARGE ANIMAL DISEASES

credits: 1  
Prerequisite: ATE 1636 with a minimum grade of “C”. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the fundamentals of preventative medicine and common diseases present in the large animal species. Aspects of equine, bovine, ovine and porcine diseases and common treatments will be emphasized. 17 contact hours.

ATE 2710   ANIMAL EMERGENCY MEDICINE

credits: 1  
Pre- or corequisite: ATE 1211 with a minimum grade of “C.” This course is designed to acquaint the student with the fundamentals of emergency veterinary medicine, including office and record systems, veterinary emergency first aid, toxicology, as well as knowledge of assistance in specialized veterinary medical and surgical techniques relating to common emergencies. 17 contact hours.

ATE 2722   AVIAN AND EXOTIC PET MEDICINE

credits: 2  

Pre or corequisite: ATE 1211 with a minimum grade of “C.” This course is designed to acquaint the student with the fundamentals of avian and exotic pet husbandry, physiology, management, and medicine. This course includes the following vertebrate groups as lecture topics: reptiles, birds and exotic mammals. 32 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 2945   VETERINARY WORK PRACTICUM III

credits: 1  

Prerequisite: ATE 1944 with a minimum grade of “C.” Pre- or corequisite: ATE 2651L with a minimum grade of “C.” This course consists of supervised clinical experience in a full service veterinary clinic and/or shelter approved by the instructor. A minimum of 64 hours is required, at least 16 of which must be performed in an animal shelter.  64 contact hours.

ATE 2946   VETERINARY WORK PRACTICUM IV

credits: 1  

Prerequisite: ATE 2945 with a minimum grade of “C.” This course consists of supervised clinical experience in a full service veterinary clinic and/or emergency clinic approved by the instructor. A minimum of 64 hours is required, at least 32 of which must be performed in an emergency clinic. 64 contact hours.

ATE 2947   VETERINARY WORK PRACTICUM V

credits: 1  

Prerequisite: ATE 2946 with a minimum grade of "C". This course consists of supervised clinical experience in a workplace approved by the instructor. A minimum of 64 hours in an approved workplace is required. 64 contact hours. May be repeated up to four times.

ATE 3100   TOOLS FOR SUCCESS

credits: 1  

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Vet Tech BAS program or Vet Tech Certificate program. This course will introduce and review core concepts that will increase the probability of the veterinary technology student’s successful completion of the Bachelor’s program in Veterinary Technology. The course is designed to familiarize and/or review the following: navigating the online environment, using the SPC online library and the Internet as a research tool, the essentials of writing and grammar, core concepts for writing using American Psychological Association (APA), standards for writing style and referencing, introduction to PowerPoint, and introduction to an electronic portfolio system. 16 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 3200   SAFETY AND REGULATORY COMPLIANCE IN VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

credits: 1  

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Vet Tech BAS program or Vet Tech Certificate program. This course will introduce and heighten veterinary technician learner’s awareness of veterinary specific safety hazards and regulatory compliance issues. The course is designed to acquaint veterinary technician learners to the following: (1) personal safety hazards, (2) patient safety hazards, (3) Human Resource issues related to safety, (4) licenses, permits, and registrations, (5) Occupational and Safety Health Administration (OSHA), and (6) reproductive and gender issues. 16 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 3316   FINANCE FOR THE VETERINARY MANAGER

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Veterinary Technology BAS Program or Vet Tech Baccalaureate Certificate Program. This course will guide the student in the study of the financial and economic concepts necessary to run a small business with an emphasis on managing cash flow and planning. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 3344   SUPERVISION IN THE VETERINARY HOSPITAL

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: ATE 3100 with a minimum grade of “C”, ATE 3200 with a minimum grade of “C" and (admission to the Vet Tech BAS program or Vet Tech Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Program). This course will prepare the student to manage the human resource cycle in its entirety in the veterinary hospital including the care of employees while in the organization. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 3410   DENTAL TECHNIQUES IN VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

credits: 3  
This course will focus on learning and applying techniques in preventive care, periodontics, endodontics, orthodontics and dental radiology appropriate for veterinary technicians. The student will acquire knowledge of dental diseases, diagnostic techniques and therapeutic technique and equipment.47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 3510   UNDERSTANDING THE HUMAN-ANIMAL BOND

credits: 3  
This course will focus on human-companion animal interactions. Students will relate to animal-assisted therapy/activity, care and uses of service animals and humane education programs. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 3515   LEGAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES IN VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: ATE 3100 with a minimum grade of “C" and (admission to the Vet Tech BAS program or Vet Tech Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Program). This course is part of the managerial track in the BAS program in veterinary technology. It will give the student an understanding of the legal and ethical aspects of veterinary practice. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 3601   INTEGRATIVE VETERINARY NURSING

credits: 3  
This course provides an overview of American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) recognized alternative and complementary therapies being used in veterinary medicine today. Emphasis will be on exploring the history, philosophy, application and research supporting each selected modality. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 3605   SMALL ANIMAL NUTRITION

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: Admission to the Veterinary Technology BAS program or Biology BS program. This course provides identification and function of nutrients, understanding of pet food labels, and applications for wellness, life stages, and therapeutic nutrition (prescription foods) for dogs and cats. 47 contact hours.

ATE 3615   VETERINARY PHARMACOLOGY

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Veterinary Technology BAS program or permission of the Dean. This course develops the concepts of pharmacology essential in understanding the advanced clinical courses of the baccalaureate program. The technologist will learn both the scientific fundamentals and the practical applications of pharmacology. The course will explore the most commonly used classes of drugs, the applications to each body system and the record keeping responsibilities involved in handling and prescribing medications, including controlled substances. Students will achieve mastery of concepts through completion of exams, written assignments and case studies. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 3616   SMALL ANIMAL NURSING

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: ATE 3615 with minimum grade of “C.” This course will focus on the nursing care required by companion animals as the result of disease or neonatal, geriatric, and obstetrical needs. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 3617   COMPANION ANIMAL DISEASES

credits: 3  

Pre- or corequisites: ATE 3744 with a minimum grade of “C” and ATE 3615 with a minimum grade of “C.” This course is designed to provide the student with essential knowledge of the common diseases affecting companion animals.  Students will learn the basics of recognizing diseases. Clinical signs, diagnostic tests and appropriate client education will be highlighted. The course will emphasize dogs and cats, but will also include other companion species including birds, ferrets and rodents. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 3642   VETERINARY OPHTHALMIC NURSING

credits: 3  
This course will focus on the duties of the veterinary technician in the course of providing ophthalmic care to dogs, cats, exotics, and horses. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 3643   LARGE ANIMAL NURSING

credits: 3  
This course will focus on the medical and surgical knowledge and skills necessary to function as an effective veterinary technician caring for equine and bovine patients. Topics covered will include diseases, nursing care, surgery, nutrition, and pain management. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 3658   ANESTHESIA AND SURGICAL NURSING

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: ATE 3615 with a minimum grade of “C.” This course will focus on anesthesia and surgical procedures associated with providing anesthesia and surgical services to veterinary patients, including anesthetic, pre-surgical, surgical, and post-surgical procedures. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 3744   ADVANCED VETERINARY TERMINOLOGY

credits: 1  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Veterinary Technology BAS program or permission of the Dean. This course expands on the basics of terminology introduced in Associate Degree terminology courses. Words for each system of the body will be mastered as well as knowledge of abbreviations used in pharmacology, record keeping and laboratory testing. Students will achieve mastery of concepts through completion of exams and written assignments requiring use of the terminology. 17 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 3803   TEACHING TECHNIQUES FOR VETERINARY TECHNICIANS

credits: 3  
This course is designed to provide the student with an introduction to educational concepts and theory relative to effective communication in many veterinary settings. Topics included are development and design of training materials, designing goals and objectives for training materials, client instruction, principles of learning, learning styles and motivation, case-based learning, and using media and software. Emphasis will be on presenting the basic concepts of planning, development and evaluation of presentations and materials. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 3914   INTRODUCTION TO VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Veterinary Technology BAS program and ATE 3100 and ATE 3200. This course is an overview of the role and scope of research as it relates to the formation of veterinary technology knowledge and the application to veterinary technology practice. The focus is on basic strategies, methodology, and the types of research design. Critiquing of current veterinary technology research is included. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 4000   VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY PRECAPSTONE

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Veterinary Technology BAS program and  ATE 3914 with a minimum grade of “C”. Pre or Co-requisite ATE 4854 with a minimum grade of "C".  This course is designed to prepare the student for successful completion of Veterinary Technology Capstone II. The student will apply knowledge of a professional role in veterinary technology to develop a capstone project based on education, internship, or research. The student will formulate a plan of study and present his/her plan to a committee for approval. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 4051   ADVANCED VETERINARY BEHAVIOR

credits: 3  
This course will introduce the student to tasks expected of a technician working at a veterinary practice where behavior cases are evaluated. Tasks to include: phone triage, collecting behavioral history, implementing a behavior plan and follow up calls and visits. Animal learning and communication dogs and cats will be covered as well as basic psychopharmacology. Student projects will include keeping a log of observed animal behavior and designing a behavioral education program. 47 or equivalent contact hours.

ATE 4317   VETERINARY HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: ATE 3100 and ATE 3200 with minimum grade of “C" and (admission to the Vet Tech BAS program or Vet Tech Baccalaureate Certificate Program). This course will give the student an overview of business subjects that will be applicable in any business environment but with particular emphasis in veterinary medicine. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 4319   VETERINARY HOSPITAL MARKETING

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Veterinary Technology program or admission to the Vet Tech Baccalaureate Certificate Program. This course will give the student an overview of pricing, advertising, product and service positioning, and marketing research methods for the veterinary hospital. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 4711   EMERGENCY AND CRITICAL CARE

credits: 3  
This course will focus on learning and applying emergency and critical care techniques appropriate for veterinary technicians. The student will acquire knowledge of the proper use of drugs, fluids, and equipment for emergency and critical care patients. Students will also learn to evaluate and monitor these patients. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 4813   VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY CAPSTONE

credits: 3  
Pre- or corequisites: ATE 3914 and ATE 4854. This course is an opportunity for the student to apply the skills and knowledge acquired in the program to a contemporary issue in the profession. It should be taken during the student's last semester at the college. The student will address a major case study or professional issue in detail. 47 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 4814   VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY CAPSTONE II

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: ATE 4000 with a minimum grade of “C” and ATE 3914 with a minimum grade of “C”. This course is an opportunity for the student to apply the skills and knowledge acquired in the program to a chosen professional role through education, internship or research. It must be taken during the student’s last semester at the college. 77 contact hours or equivalent.

ATE 4854   LEADERSHIP IN VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: ATE 3100 with minimum grade of “C,” ATE 3200 with minimum grade of “C"  and (admission to the Vet Tech BAS program or Vet Tech Certificate Program). This course focuses on the theories, concepts and principles of leadership. Emphasis will be on the development of leadership skills related to personal behavior, communication, organization and self-examination. This course explores opportunity to develop leadership roles appropriate to the veterinary technology profession. 47 contact hours or equivalent.


<< Prefix Definitions