Course List


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CAP 2134   DATABASE SECURITY

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CTS 1120 with a minimum grade of C. This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of database security concepts and practices. The objective of the course is to provide hands-on instruction in various database tasks that relate to securing the confidentiality, integrity and availability of information that is stored in a database. The student will be able to perform administrative tasks in different database management systems, as well as manage database user profiles, privileges, and roles. Different database application security models will be explored, as will the security advantages of utilizing virtual private databases. Finally, the process of database auditing will be explored, including auditing methods using various database management systems. 47 contact hours.

CAP 2733   C++ PROGRAMMING WITH DIRECTX

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: COP 2222 with a minimum grade of C. This is an advanced programming course in C++ language. Emphasis is placed on graphical programming using DirectX, Windows Application Programming Interface (API), the Graphics class, vectors, collision detection, Sprites and animation. Topics covered will include the 2d graphics applications, C++ and DirectX. 

CAP 4760   INTRODUCTION TO ANALYTICS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite:  Admission to TMGT-BAS.  This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental data concepts such as the difference between data and information, big data, and the process of manipulating and analyzing data through the use of statistics. It covers current topics relating to big data and explains how organizations use data to add value.

CCJ 1020   INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE

credits: 3  
This course is an introduction to the philosophical and historical background of the American criminal justice system. Discussed are the organization, operation and processes of the justice system components: police, courts, and corrections. 47 contact hours.

CCJ 1512   GANGS AND TERRORISM

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: permission of the program director. This course introduces the student to the interrelationship of gangs, drug trafficking, conspiracy, and terrorism. The course is designed to provide the student with knowledge of legal elements of a criminal conspiracy to include terrorism operations, drug interdiction, and gang organizations. 47 contact hours.

CCJ 2509   INTRODUCTION TO GANGS AND CRIME

credits: 3  
This course provides students with an overview of street gangs, the social factors, and the general classifications necessary for the law enforcement, corrections, and public safety professional. This course explores the history, membership, activity, current trends, and influence of street gangs. Students will be challenged to define community-based solutions, and strategies to combat the criminal activity associated with street gangs. 47 contact hours.

CCJ 2511   INTERVENTION AND PROSECUTION TECHNIQUES FOR GANGS

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Permission of the Program Director. This course provides the student with the knowledge and strategies to vigorously target, investigate, prosecute and prevent resurgence of criminal street gangs. This course provides an overview of the origins of gangs, the relationship between gangs and organized crime, and the identification and investigation of criminal street gang members and organizations. The student will explore the factors and programs that can deter and impact gang membership, and the prosecution of encountered criminal street gangs throughout the country. 47 contact hours.

CCJ 2618   CRIMINAL PSYCHOLOGY

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Program Director's approval. This course is an examination of psychology of human behavior as it relates to crime. The student will be introduced to psychopathology, the sexually violent offender, and serial murder. The student will also examine violent juvenile offenders and the process of psychological conditioning which allows them to commit violent criminal acts. 47 contact hours.

CCJ 2704   SURVEY OF RESEARCH METHODS FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CCJ 1020. This introductory course will examine research strategies, data collection, and data analysis in the investigation of questions which arise in criminology and criminal justice. Particular focus will be placed on understanding the role, theory, and functions of the research process for criminal justice professionals. 47 contact hours.

CCJ 2940   PRACTICUM

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Permission of Program Director. This course is designed to provide students with supervised work experience in public safety or social service institutions that deal in the prevention, intervention, suppression, or prosecution of gang crime or activity. This work experience may be voluntary or paid and is at the discretion of the institution. The student must fulfill the requirement of a minimum of 60 hours on the job work experience. The student will be required to complete writing assignments related to the work experience. 47 contact hours.

CEN 4024   ADVANCED PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORKS

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: COP 3022 with a minimum grade of C and Admission to TMGT-BAS.  This course will provide the student the skills to apply the Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) to developing a business programming application. The student will implement advanced programming techniques using appropriate algorithms, programming concepts and tools. The course provides also the student with the necessary computing theories to produce software applications from the design documents. 47 contact hours.

CEN 4722   HUMAN COMPUTER INTERFACES

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: ISM 3232 with a minimum grade of C and Admission to TMGT-BAS.  This course will provide the student the necessary elements in understanding and integrating Human Computer Interaction (HCI) into the area of information technology. The student will learn user-centered methodologies in the design, development, evaluation, and employment of application and system software. 47 contact hours.

CET 1114C   DIGITAL FUNDAMENTALS WITH LAB

credits: 4  

This course will cover number systems, codes, logic gates, Boolean algebra, logic simplification and combinational logic. The areas of coverage will also include the study of the theory, concepts, and circuits of digital electronics including decoders, encoders, multiplexers, flip flops, counters, and registers used in the applications of combinational and sequential logic. The laboratory exercises cover the measurement and analysis of digital circuits and devices. 62 contact hours.

CET 1171C   COMPUTER REPAIR ESSENTIALS

credits: 3  

This course is designed to teach the student basic technical skills needed to understand the function and operation of major elements of personal computer systems, and how to localize and correct common hardware problems. Students will acquire hands-on experience with Personal Computer (PC) systems. The course will focus on broad concepts and diagnostic tools which allow the student to determine the condition of a PC system and how to best correct a fault. Special emphasis will be placed on how systems are configured, modified, and expanded to meet new requirements. Various software tools will be used to diagnose PC problems. This course prepares students for the A+ Essentials portion of Computer Support Technician certification offered by CompTIA (A+ Certification). 47 contact hours.

CET 1172C   COMPUTER SUPPORT TECHNICIAN

credits: 3  

This course is designed to teach the student basic technical and troubleshooting skills needed to understand the function and operation of major elements of personal computer systems, and how to localize and correct common software problems. The student will install operating systems, configure computer security, address common security threats, and harden the system against exploits. The student will formulate disaster recovery procedures and implement them as instructed. The student will also install and troubleshoot computer peripherals. This course, will prepare the student for the A+ Certified IT Technician portion of Computer Support Technician Certification offered by CompTIA (A+ Certification). 47 contact hours.

CET 1600   NETWORK FUNDAMENTALS

credits: 3  

This is the first of four courses designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience to achieve professional certification as a Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA). Instruction includes, but is not limited to networking, network terminology and protocols, network standards, local area networks (LANs), wide area networks (WANs), the open system interconnection (OSI) reference model, cabling, routers, router configuration , LAN/WAN topologies, Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) addressing and network standards. Students will install, configure and operate a simple-routed/switched LAN, and routed WAN. 47 contact hours.

CET 1610   ROUTING PROTOCOLS AND CONCEPTS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Completion of  CET 1600 or CCNA certification. This is the second of four courses designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience to achieve professional certification as a Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA). Instruction includes networking, network terminology and protocols, network standards, local area networks (LANs),Ethernet, Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) addressing, static and dynamic routing. Students will successfully implement basic router configuration, demonstrate an understanding of routed and routing protocols. 47 contact hours.

CET 2615   LAN SWITCHING AND WIRELESS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CET 1610. This is the third of four courses designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience to achieve professional certification as a Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA). Instruction includes networking, network terminology and protocols, network standards, local area networks (LANs), LAN segmentation, segmentation techniques, Internet Protocol (IP) addressing, Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, Spanning Tree Protocol virtual LAN, and wireless LANs. Students progress to completing advanced router configurations in the lab; they will demonstrate an understanding of LAN switching and virtual local area networks (VLANs), advanced LAN and wireless LAN design. 47 contact hours.

CET 2620   ACCESSING THE WAN

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: CET 1610 and CET 2615. This is the last of four courses designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience to achieve professional certification as a Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA). Instruction includes networking, protocols, network standards, advanced network design projects, advanced network management projects, wide area network (WAN) theory and design, WAN technology, Frame Relay, integrated system digital network (ISDN), and network troubleshooting. 47 contact hours.

CET 2670   SCALABLE ROUTING PROTOCOLS AND IPv6

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: CCNA certified or completion of CET 2620. This course is designed to provide students with an integrated classroom and laboratory experience in advanced topics of implementation and integration of Cisco networking equipment using routing protocols. Instruction includes, but is not limited to Interior Gateway Protocols (IGPs), Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4), Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6), and current topics related to routing protocols. Students will design and configure LAN and WAN networks using case studies and laboratory equipment. 47 contact hours.

CET 2682   FUNDAMENTALS OF VOICE OVER IP (VoIP)

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: CCNA certification or completion of CET 2620. Instruction includes, but is not limited to, Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) theory, Voice Gateway configuration in a IP Telephony (IPT) solution, IP Phone configuration, design of VoIP networks and troubleshooting IPT networks. Students will design and configure various VoIP networks using case studies and laboratory equipment. 47 contact hours.

CET 2685   IMPLEMENTING SECURE CONVERGED WANS

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: Completion of CET 2620 or CCNA certification. This course examines an overall approach to network security topics including, but not limited to, integration of hardware firewalls, Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS), Intrusion Prevention Systems (IPS), Internet Protocol Security (IPSec), and Virtual Private Networking (VPN) in network security design. Students will implement designs using equipment in a laboratory setting. This course also prepares students for the CCNA Security certification. 47 contact hours.

CET 2691   LAWS AND LEGAL ASPECTS OF IT SECURITY

credits: 3  

This course provides students with an overview of legal issues common to computer security, and interweaves business paradigms into the reading to offer a macro-context against which to view such issues. These issues topically fall within the parameters of privacy, intellectual property, computer crime investigation for network breaches, civil liability, and ethics of the Information Technology (IT) professional focused on network security. The course will seek to expand on all matters of law that may be included on any network security certification exam, but also covers broadly the economic impact that security breaches have on industry sectors and the business response required. Coursework will include reviewing fact patterns applied to legal and ethical authorities. 47 contact hours.

CET 2856   IMPLEMENTING CISCO IP SWITCHED NETWORKS (SWITCH)

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Completion of CET 2620 or CCNA certification. This course is designed to provide students with advanced classroom experience in Local Area Network (LAN) and Wide Area Network (WAN) switching. Instruction includes, but is not limited to, Virtual Local Area Network configuration (VLAN), VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP), VLAN Pruning, Spanning Tree Protocol (STP), routing between VLANs, multi-layer switch operations, Hot Standby Routing Protocol (HSRP), restricting network access with switching security techniques, installing Access Control Lists (ACLs) on switches, wireless technology applications with switches, configuring Quality of Service (QoS) on switches, and Voice Over Internet Protocol (VoIP) integration. Students will install, configure, and operate complex-routed LAN and WAN switching networks. 47 contact hours.

CET 2940   NETWORK ENGINEERING INTERNSHIP

credits: 3.00  

Prerequisite: Student must have completed a minimum of 15 credits of major coursework. The purpose of this course is to allow students a “real world” experience with major-related, supervised, evaluated practical work experiences which may be paid or voluntary. Students are graded on the basis of documented learning acquired through hands-on experiences in an actual work setting. The student must fulfill the requirement of 180 on-the-job hours in addition to written assignments. 

CET 2949   CO-OP WORK EXPERIENCE

credits: 1-3  
Prerequisite: Faculty Advisor/Co-op Coordinator or Program Director approval. This course is designed to provide students with major-related, supervised, evaluated practical training work experiences which may be paid or voluntary. Students are graded on the basis of documented learning acquired through hands-on experiences in an actual work setting. Variable credits are available, one to three per course. The student must fulfill the requirement of 60 on-the-job hours for each credit earned in addition to written assignments. Co-op courses may be repeated but total credits shall not exceed twelve.

CGS 1070   BASIC COMPUTER AND INFORMATION LITERACY

credits: 1  

This course is designed to develop computer and information literacy skills to help students become active participants in the Information Age. It introduces general computer operations using the microcomputer. Emphasis will be placed on using the mouse, disk and file management and overall desktop techniques. An introduction to a word processing and a spreadsheet program is included. Further, the course will introduce students to the core concepts of information literacy and essential techniques for locating, analyzing, organizing and presenting information for research purposes. The course stresses strategies for using a variety of electronic resources emphasizing technological skills and critical thinking abilities as well as coping with the changing nature of information resources, computer and internet ethics, and security. 16 contact hours

CGS 1100   COMPUTER APPLICATIONS

credits: 3  
This course is an introduction to fundamental concepts utilizing a computer as the tool. Contemporary projects are produced through the use of integrated applications software. Selected topics include the Internet, operating systems, and creating and evaluating documents, worksheets, databases, and presentations. Guidelines for selecting computer hardware and software are addressed. Additional topics include conducting Internet research and critically assessing the value of that research, Internet ethics and security. Satisfactory completion of this course meets the Computer and Information Literacy graduation requirement. 47 contact hours.

CGS 1172   E-COMMERCE SITE DESIGNER I

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: CGS 1070 or permission of program director. This course is designed to teach students the basic concepts of conducting business online and technological issues associated with constructing an electronic commerce (e-commerce) website. 47 contact hours.

CGS 1301   INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION SYSTEMS

credits: 3  

This course is designed to provide students with a foundational understanding of Information Systems (IS) as they apply to the computer industry. Topics will include Information Systems fundamentals; IS infrastructure; organizational and business strategies for Information Systems; Managing Information Systems; Information Systems for commerce and collaboration; business intelligence and Enterprise Information Systems; security, privacy and ethics for Information Systems. 47 contact hours.

CGS 1515   SPREADSHEET TECHNIQUES AND PROGRAMMING

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: COP 1000 or CGS 1100. This course will provide students with hands-on experience and skills with a spreadsheet. Students will learn the various functions and commands of the spreadsheet as well as how to plan, create, and program spreadsheets for common business applications. It is appropriate for accounting and business majors, programmers and spreadsheet application developers. 47 contact hours.

CGS 1545   DATABASE TECHNIQUES

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: COP 1000 with a minimum grade of "C" or CGS 1100 with a minimum grade of "C". This course will provide students with hands-on experience in creating and maintaining a relational database application. Students will learn the various functions and commands of the database as well as how to plan, create, use, and program fully relational databases for common business applications. Students will learn rlational database theory and design, formal naming conventions, and database programming techniques. 47 contact hours.

CGS 1560   COMPUTER OPERATING SYSTEMS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: COP 1000 or CGS 1100. This is a course designed to make a student proficient in microcomputer operating systems. Major topics include disk and file management, system configurations, menu driven processing and graphical user interfaces. 47 contact hours.

CGS 1821   WEB GRAPHICS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CGS 1831 with a minimum grade of C. This course explores design considerations involved when using graphics on the web. Topics include industry standard programs, file formats, and platform/browser issues. Students will learn how to create and manipulate graphics. Participants will also learn how to create background tiles, graphical rules, bullets and buttons. Several different software programs are used throughout the course. 47 contact hours.

CGS 1822   WEB SITE ESSENTIALS

credits: 2  

Prerequisite: COP 1822 with topic HTML, or permission of program administrator. This course introduces the basic skills necessary to be an effective designer and/or developer for the World Wide Web, and is the foundation class for the Web Design and Developer Programs. The student will be introduced to skills that are necessary to develop and maintain complex Web sites, including a fundamental understanding of the client-server nature of the World Wide Web. The student will learn to separate content and format, including an understanding of basic Web page and site design using Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). 32 contact hours.

CGS 1827   WEB GRAPHICS DESIGN II

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CGS 1821. This course is designed to follow Web Graphics Design I extending the student’s overall knowledge of web graphics and their possibilities. Students will create graphical/text links, image maps and navigation bars as a method of navigation throughout a Web site. Participants will create type and explore surrounding issues like aliasing and its effects. Students will scan, resize, and use tables to aid with placement and alignment of graphics. Animated Graphics Interchange Formats (GIFS), sound, and interactivity are important topics also covered in this course. 47 contact hours.

CGS 1831   WEB FOUNDATIONS/ESSENTIALS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CGS 1070 or CGS 1100 or COP 1000 with a minimum grade of C or Computer/Information Literacy opt-out exam with a passing grade. This course is designed to introduce an experienced computer user to the tools necessary to be an effective designer and/or developer for the World Wide Web, and is the foundation class for the Web Design and Developer Programs. The student will gain the skills necessary to develop and maintain complex Web sites, including a fundamental understanding of the protocols and vocabulary of web production in addition to client-server dynamics. Topics covered will include HTML, XHTML, interactive graphics, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and forms. 47 contact hours.

CGS 1846   WEB SITE MARKETING AND USABILITY

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Permission of the Dean. This course is an introduction to Web site marketing concepts critical to the success of commercial Web sites. Topics will include planning and creating user-friendly navigation (usability) in complex Web sites and applying Americans with Disability Act (ADA) Web site design guidelines. 47 contact hours.

CGS 1874   INTRODUCTION TO FLASH

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CGS 1831 or permission of the Dean. This is a survey course designed to introduce the concepts of Flash and multimedia animation. Students will be exposed to different areas of Flash and multimedia techniques that include text, images, audio, video and animation. Students will have the opportunity to learn how to manipulate text, produce simple animations, incorporate audio and video, and learn basic ActionScripting. They will learn to combine the components into Web sites. 47 contact hours.

CGS 2173   E-COMMERCE SITE DESIGNER II

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: CGS 1172. This course is designed to extend the knowledge gained in E-Commerce Site Designer I and apply this knowledge to creating and implementing a transaction-enabled business-to-consumer Web site using various electronic-commerce (e-commerce) strategies and products. The course focuses on applying theory and design to e-commerce Web construction. 47 contact hours.

CGS 2402   PROGRAMMING IN C++ FOR BUSINESS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: COP 1000 with a minimum grade of C. This is a programming course in the C language. The student will learn to design, document, prepare, enter, compile, debug and execute C++ programs of moderate sophistication. Major topics covered include: history, structured programming, data types, data structures, and input/output in C++. 47 contact hours.

CGS 2651   COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGIES

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CGS 1100. This course is designed to teach students how to interact using shared collaborative communication tools and resources. Students will learn how to identify and apply Web-based social collaboration technologies for business and personal use. Major topics covered include: identifying the differences between Web 1.0, 2.0, 3.0; reviewing collaboration software (DropBox, Google Docs, Sharepoint); communicating using social media sites (Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, FourSquare, Tumblr); organizing and applying web syndication to online data. 47 contact hours.

CGS 2811   INCIDENT RESPONSE AND DISASTER RECOVERY

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CTS 1120. This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the concepts and practices of contingency operations, including the administration of the planning process for incident response, disaster recovery, and business continuity planning. Topics include organizational readiness planning, the phases of incident response, different contingency strategies, tasks related to the preparation, implementation, operations, and maintenance of disaster recovery, and business continuity. 47 contact hours.

CGS 2823   ADVANCED WEB SITE DEVELOPMENT

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CGS 1831 with a minimum grade of C . The student will demonstrate the ability to implement a Web site from beginning to post production. The student will create a new Web site plan, storyboard, and Web site design plan directed toward a final Web site implementation project. The student will apply sound graphic techniques including optimization and animation. The student will also create a Web site marketing plan, a site budget, and use tools for tracking, evaluating and maintaining a Web site. 47 contact hours.

CGS 2940   WEB DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: 15 credit hours completed within the major courses. The purpose of this course is to allow students a “real world” experience with major-related, supervised, evaluated practical work experiences which may be paid or voluntary. Students are graded on the basis of documented learning acquired through hands-on experiences in an actual work setting. The student must fulfill the requirement of 180 on-the-job hours in addition to written assignments. 

CHM 1025   INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017 and MAT 1033) or (EAP 1695 and MAT 1033) or (appropriate score on SPC placement test). Corequisite: CHM 1025L. This introductory course is a presentation of modern chemistry concepts, periodicity and atomic structure, states of matter, chemical formulas and nomenclature, chemical reactions, chemical calculations, and solutions. This course will prepare students for General Chemistry but is not designed for credit toward a major in chemistry and may not be taken for credit subsequent to receiving a grade of "C" or better in CHM 2045/2045L or CHM 2046/2046L. 47 contact hours.

CHM 1025L   INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY LAB

credits: 1  
Corequisite: CHM 1025. This introductory chemistry lab course includes experiments involving mass, volume, the nature of substances, density, solubility, graphing, dimensional analysis, empirical formulas, titration, gas laws, and solutions. 45 contact hours.

CHM 1026   CHEMICAL CALCULATIONS

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: CHM 1025 and 1025L. This course places further emphasis on the mastery of equation writing and of calculations involving: gas laws, formulas, weight and volume relationships, and standard solution. The concept of significant figures is included. This course is not designed for credit toward a major in chemistry and may not be taken for credit subsequent to receiving a grade of "C" or better in CHM 2045 or CHM 2046. 47 contact hours.

CHM 2045   GENERAL CHEMISTRY I

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: (1) CHM 1025/1025L with a grade of "C" or better or (2) CHM 1026 with a grade of "C" or better or (3) one year of high school chemistry and permission of the program administrator, and MAC 1105 or MAC 1106 with a grade of “C” or better. Corequisite: CHM 2045L. The sequence CHM 2045/2045L and CHM 2046/2046L is designed to meet first-year college chemistry requirements for science majors and engineering students. This course includes the study of periodicity, basic quantum theory, bonding, thermochemistry, stoichiometry, gas laws, properties of the liquid and solid states, and solutions. 47 contact hours.

CHM 2045L   GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I

credits: 1  
Corequisite: CHM 2045. This course includes laboratory experiments which are quantitative in nature and designed to give practice in acceptable laboratory techniques. 45 contact hours.

CHM 2046   GENERAL CHEMISTRY II

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: CHM 2045/2045L with grades of “C” or better. Corequisite: CHM 2046L. This course is a continuation of General Chemistry I and extends the study of chemical principles in thermodynamics, kinetics, acid-base reactions, oxidation-reduction, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and gaseous and solution equilibra. 47 contact hours.

CHM 2046L   GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II

credits: 1  
Corequisite: CHM 2046. This course is a continuation of General Chemistry Laboratory I. It includes some qualitative analysis. 45 contact hours.

CHM 2210   ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CHM 2045 with a grade of "C" or better; CHM 2045L with a grade of "C" or better. Corequisite: CHM 2210L. Pre- or corequisite: CHM 2046. This course is a study of carbon compounds emphasizing nomenclature, reaction mechanisms, synthesis, stereo-chemistry, functionality and including an introduction to spectroscopy. 47 contact hours.

CHM 2210L   ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I

credits: 1  
Corequisite: CHM 2210. This laboratory course involves basic techniques for the synthesis, purification, and identification of organic compounds. These techniques include filtration, separation, melting point determination, spectroscopy, recrystallization, distillation, evaporation, reflux and assembly and care of glassware. 45 contact hours.

CHM 2211   ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CHM 2210 with a grade of "C" or better; CHM 2210L with a grade of "C" or better. Corequisite: CHM 2211L. This course is a continuation of Organic Chemistry I emphasizing reaction mechanisms, synthesis, functionality and spectroscopy. 47 contact hours.

CHM 2211L   ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II

credits: 1  
Corequisite: CHM 2211. Laboratory work involves synthesis, purification and identification of organic compounds involving special techniques such as infrared spectroscopy or gas chromatography. 47 contact hours.

CIS 1358   OPERATING SYSTEM SECURITY

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: CTS 1120. This course introduces the student to securing Windows 2000 and Linux operating systems. In this course the student will acquire knowledge and skills to perform audit assessments and implement enterprise-wide operating systems security. The objective of the course is to provide hands-on instruction, from the desktops, servers and the network infrastructure and understand how to control the privacy, integrity and authenticity of data. 47 contact hours.

CIS 2321   SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CGS 1100 or COP 1000. This course provides the student with ways to understand and apply fundamentals of systems analysis to the development of information systems used in business, government or nonprofit environments. Both individual and team approaches are taken to analyze systems projects utilizing current information systems applications. The student will become familiar with a range of techniques for systems analysis. The student will be made aware of the importance of developing good human relations skills and the need to understand and deal with the social and political culture in organizations in the course of system analysis and design. 47 contact hours.

CIS 2352   ETHICAL HACKING

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CTS 1120. This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the techniques and methodologies of security penetration testing. This course provides hands-on instruction using the various tools and methods that security professionals use to analyze an information system in order to discover vulnerabilities and protect against information loss, cyber-terrorism, and corporate espionage. The student will be introduced to fundamental security testing concepts, gain practical knowledge of computer programming, and learn how to properly document a security test. In addition to exploring the legal and ethical ramifications of penetration testing, students will also learn how to apply the appropriate countermeasures in order to reduce the risk that an organization faces. 47 contact hours.

CIS 2940   TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Approval of the College-wide Internship Office. This course provides the student with a supervised, practical learning experience in a work setting that is relevant to his/her program of study. Through course assignments and workplace projects the student will apply, connect, and extend academic theory and competencies for the purpose of building professional skills and affiliations. 180 contact hours

CJB 1005   CMS HUMAN SERVICES

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Program Director's approval. This course is an examination of the many services that a police officer has to provide to the public. The student will be introduced to the "S.E.C.U.R.E. Method of Problem Solving" to assist in addressing the needs of the mentally retarded, mentally ill, substance abusers, physically disabled, street gangs, extremist groups and the elderly. The objectives addressed include those as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission (CJSTC)'s Curriculum Maintenance System (CMS) curriculum. 55 contact hours.

CJB 1015   CMS COMMUNICATIONS

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Program Director's approval. This course is an examination of the police report writing process. The student will be introduced to report writing, interviewing, taking statements, the use of telecommunications, crisis intervention, community oriented policing, "S.E.C.U.R.E.", and officer survival. Objectives addressed include those as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission's Curriculum Maintenance System (CMS) curriculum. 70 contact hours.

CJB 1031C   FIRST AID FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE OFFICERS

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: Program Director's approval. This course is based on Department of Transportation (D.O.T.) techniques for handling medical emergencies. The student will be introduced to injury assessment, types of resuscitation, signs, and symptoms and methods of transmission of communicable diseases. Objectives addressed include those as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission. 40 contact hours.

CJB 1040C   CMS FIREARMS

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: Program Director's approval. This course includes the use of officer firearms including the semi-automatic pistol, revolver, rifle/carbine and shotgun. Instruction includes firearms safety, ammunition use, discretionary shooting, day and night courses of fire, and survival firearms training. Objectives are addressed as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission (CJSTC)'s Curriculum Maintenance System (CMS) curriculum. 80 contact hours.

CJB 1085   CMS LAW ENFORCEMENT TRAFFIC

credits: 4  
Prerequisites: Program Director's approval and CJB 1005, CJB 1015, CJB 1031C, CJB 2006, CJB 2020C, CJB 1040C, CJB 2050C, CJB 2060, CJB 2070, CJB 1495. This course includes traffic enforcement and control, with the inclusion of Driving Under the Influence (DUI) offenses and enforcement. The student will also be introduced to traffic crash investigation, scene management, reporting procedures, and the court process. Objectives addressed include those as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission (CJSTC). 79 contact hours.

CJB 1495   CRIMINAL JUSTICE WELLNESS

credits: 1  
Prerequisite: Program Director's approval. This course is an examination of wellness as it relates to the police officer. The student will examine stress, nutrition, stretching, strength, and aerobic conditioning as it relates to an officer's survival and daily living. This course is a part of the Curriculum Maintenance System (CMS) curriculum. 26 contact hours.

CJB 2006   CMS POLICE PRACTICES AND CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

credits: 4  
Prerequisite: Program Director approval. This course is an introduction to policing. The student will be introduced to Florida's Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission (CJSTC) and the policies and rules which govern police officer standards within the State of Florida. The student will also be introduced to the Criminal Justice System in Florida, constitutional law, ethics, interpersonal skills, human interaction, and hazardous materials. Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission (CJSTC)'s Curriculum Maintenance System (CMS) curriculum. 76 contact hours.

CJB 2020C   CMS VEHICLE OPERATIONS

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: Program Director's approval. This course examines the components of the police driving examining the physiological and psychological factors which impact the operation of a vehicle. The student will be introduced to vehicle maintenance, vehicle dynamics, environmental conditions, skids and their causes, and practical driving exercises which are conducted on the driving range. Objectives are addressed as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission's Curriculum Maintenance System (CMS) curriculum. 48 contact hours.

CJB 2050C   CMS DEFENSIVE TACTICS

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: Program Director's approval. This course is an examination of police defensive tactics. The student will be introduced to the techniques used for an officer's personal safety and the use of dialogue, empty hand control techniques, impact weapons, chemical agents, and restraining devices are covered. Objectives are addressed as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission's Curriculum Maintenance System (CMS) curriculum. 80 contact hours.

CJB 2060   CMS LAW ENFORCEMENT PATROL OPERATIONS

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Program Director's approval and CJB 1005, CJB 1015, CJB 1031C, CJB 2006, CJB 2020C, CJB 1040C, CJB 2050C, CJB 1495. This course addresses the daily skills and techniques needed by officers to perform patrol tactics and respond to various types of calls. Students will be introduced to the S.E.C.U.R.E. Method of Problem Solving, Community Oriented Policing (COP), patrol procedures, arrest and custody, and responding to alarms. Objectives addressed include those as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission's Curriculum Maintenance System (CMS) curriculum. 55 contact hours.

CJB 2070   CMS LAW ENFORCEMENT INVESTIGATIONS

credits: 4  
Prerequisite: Program Director's approval. This course is an examination of the criminal investigation process. The student will be introduced to the investigation of various crimes, including property crimes, persons crimes, narcotics offenses, vice, organized crime, and death investigations. Techniques are developed from the initial observation methods through the processing of the crime scene and case preparation. Florida's computer network is studied as an information source. Objectives addresses include those as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission's Curriculum Maintenance System (CMS) curriculum. 87 contact hours.

CJB 2090   CMS SPECIAL TOPICS IN LAW ENFORCEMENT

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Program Director's approval and CJB 1015, CJB 1005, CJB 1031C, CJB 2006, CJB 2020C, CJB 2050C, CJB 2060, CJB 2070, CJB 1085 and CJB 1495. This course is an examination of rescue methods, bombs and explosives, crowd control, and special details. The objectives addressed include those as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission (CJSTC)'s Curriculum Maintenance System (CMS) curriculum. 54 contact hours.

CJC 2212   THE INCARCERATION CONNECTION

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Permission of the Program Director. This course provides an overview of the correctional and detention structure and the management skills necessary to understand the security threat of criminal street gangs. The student will gain an understanding of the influence and culture of gang members during incarceration and the connection to the community. 47 contact hours.

CJC 2350   CORRECTIONAL OPERATIONS

credits: 4  
The operation of correctional facilities is studied - including the intake of new inmates, all aspects of their daily care, institutional procedures, and techniques utilized by officers to perform daily tasks. Objectives addressed include those as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission. 64 contact hours.

CJC 2930   SPECIAL TOPICS IN CORRECTIONS

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: Program Director's approval. This course is an examination of the unique problems that are associated with the institution of corrections. The student will be introduced to the philosophies, history, contemporary issues, and sentencing. The student will also examine the issues of race and gender as they are associated with corrections. 32 contact hours.

CJC 3163   MANAGEMENT OF COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS

credits: 3  
This course will provide the student with an understanding of community-based corrections, including probation, parole, residential intermediate sanctions, and non-residential sanctions. Emphasis will be placed on the management role in implementing solutions to the challenges facing the corrections professional. 47 contact hours.

CJC 3311   CONTEMPORARY ISSUES AND TRENDS IN CORRECTIONS

credits: 3  
This course will provide the student with an understanding of the evolution of the U.S. Corrections system, specifically the antecedents of modern corrections, the operation and administration of corrections facilities, and the role of corrections in modern society. Emphasis will be placed on the issues and trends in corrections affecting administration and management. 47 contact hours.

CJC 3601   CORRECTIONS PRACTICE AND POLICY

credits: 3  
This course will provide the student with an understanding of the principles of modern management theory to the operations and functions that comprise the leadership of progressive custodial and non-custodial correctional practice. Relevant aspects of human resource management will also be considered and applied to the corrections industry. 47 contact hours.

CJE 1100   CRIMINAL JUSTICE LEGAL I

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Program Director approval. This course provides an introductory overview of the criminal justice system and history of law. The foundation and basic components of law are studied, with specific focus upon officer application. Court procedure and testimony are examined. Objectives addressed include those as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission. 47 contact hours.

CJE 1101   CRIMINAL JUSTICE LEGAL II

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Program Director approval. Constitutional law and its application to the public and officers are examined. Law - including evidence procedures, arrest law, search and seizure, and various statutory laws that are common to police and correctional officers - is studied. Emphasis is given to elements of various crimes. Various civil law applications are covered. Civil and criminal liability of officers is studied. Objectives addressed include those as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commissions. 47 contact hours.

CJE 1177   CENTRAL AMERICA GANG ASSESSMENT

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Permission of the Program Director. This course provides the student with an overview of the gang presence and criminal activity in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Mexico; and the rationale for the United States’ interest in understanding the gang phenomena in these countries. Students will explore the severity of the gang problem, causes, and risk factors for gang activity. Students will examine the current strategic and programmatic recommendations to impact gang activity in these countries. 47 contact hours.

CJE 1202   CRIME AND DELINQUENCY

credits: 3  
This course will provide the student with the opportunity to explore crime theories, crime causation, crime in the modern world, and future trends of criminology and delinquency. In addition, the student will examine theory versus reality throughout the course. 47 contact hours.

CJE 1204   CONTEMPORARY TOPICS IN GANG INVESTIGATIONS

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Permission of the Program Director. This course provides an examination of unique and contemporary gang-related investigation topics, problems, and issues that deserve greater exploration and analysis as the body of knowledge related to gang investigations evolves. The student will be introduced to the contemporary issues surrounding the course topic, historical perspectives, foundational philosophies, and strategies and programs within the context of the course topic. 47 contact hours.

CJE 1442   CRIME PREVENTION AND ANALYSIS

credits: 3  
Prerequisites: Program Director permission. This course provides the students with an overview of crime prevention and analysis. Students will learn the theories and methods of crime prevention. They will also learn analytic techniques to gauge the relative merit of specific crime prevention efforts. Areas will include the development of crime prevention as a field of criminological inquiry, as well as data sources that assist in analyzing crime patterns and the effectiveness of prevention efforts. 47 contact hours.

CJE 1452   CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERPERSONAL SKILLS I

credits: 4  
Prerequisite: Program Director approval. In this course community relations techniques and courtesy are addressed, with emphasis given to crime prevention. The needs of various groups within society are addressed, including: juveniles, the elderly, ethnic and cultural groups, the mentally ill and retarded, the physically handicapped, and substance abusers. Intervention techniques for various situations including suicide, domestic violence, and other crises are studied, with practical exercises. Stress recognition and reduction are included. Human diversity training is designed to enhance awareness of one's own cultural rules and predispositions and how these cultural influences comes into play in common interaction with others. Objectives addressed include those as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission. 62 contact hours.

CJE 1456   CRIMINAL JUSTICE COMMUNICATIONS

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Program Director approval. This course covers community relations techniques and courtesy are addressed, with emphasis given to crime prevention. The needs of various groups within society are addressed, including: juveniles, the elderly, ethnic and cultural groups, the mentally ill and retarded, the physically handicapped, and substance abusers. Intervention techniques for various situations including: suicide, domestic violence, and other crises are studied, with practical exercises. Stress recognition and reduction are included. Human diversity training is designed to enhance awareness of one's own cultural rules and predispositions and how these cultural influences come into play in common interaction with others. Objectives addressed include those as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission. 56 contact hours.

CJE 1640   INTRODUCTION TO CRIME SCENE TECHNOLOGY

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017) or EAP 1695 or appropriate scores on the English and Reading placement tests. This course is an introductory course in crime scene investigation techniques. Emphasis is placed upon recording the crime scene, collecting and preserving physical evidence, and the examination of evidence. Employment of those techniques available to the crime scene investigator also will be demonstrated. 47 contact hours.

CJE 1643   ADVANCED CRIME SCENE TECHNOLOGY

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: CJE 1640. This course covers advanced principles, theories and applications in crime scene technology. Specialized collection procedures of weapons, traffic crash evidence, arson, gun shot residue, blood spatter, and recovery of buried bodies and surface skeletons are also included. Data analysis, reporting and plan of action development are emphasized. 47 contact hours.

CJE 1653   INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE ANALYSIS

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Permission of Program Director. This course will provide the student with an overview of criminal intelligence analysis, basic criminal intelligence, and investigative analysis techniques in contemporary law enforcement agencies. The course will specifically focus on understanding the criminal intelligence analysis function, various charting techniques, both manually and by the use of RF Flow, analysis of telephone toll records, and spreadsheet analysis using Microsoft Excel. The student will be able to analyze and summarize case data in a clear, concise, and graphical format. Students will be required to utilize the college library, internet resources, and demonstrate skills in Microsoft Excel in order to complete assignments, both in the classroom and computer laboratory environments. The course provides a hands-on practical approach using real-world examples and case scenarios. 47 contact hours.

CJE 1660   File System Forensic Analysis

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CCJ 1020. This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of computer forensics as it relates to different types of file systems and hard disks. The student will learn how to investigate different digital media devices that are encountered in computer forensic investigations. The student will also explore how the boot processes work in Windows, Linux, and Macintosh devices. The student will evaluate the different ways that investigators capture information from both Windows and Linux operating systems. Finally, the student will analyze how application password crackers are used in a cyberlaw investigation. 47 contact hours.

CJE 1661   Computer Hardware for Forensic Investigators

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: Permission of the program administrator, as well as basic computer skills, such as editing files, navigating a file system, and proficiency in the use of the Internet. This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of computer hardware in order to assist the student with computer related investigations. In this course, the student learns about basic computer hardware components, including how computer motherboards and processors function. The student also evaluates the purposes of computer memory and hard drives. The installation and support of input/output devices is covered, as is the various purposes of multimedia and mass storage devices. Finally, the student will examine how to troubleshoot notebooks and printers. 47 contact hours.

CJE 1665   Investigating Network Intrusions

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: Permission of the program administrator, as well as basic computer skills, such as editing files, navigating a file system, and proficiency in the use of the Internet. This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of cybercrime and network forensics. The objective of the course is to provide hands-on instruction in various investigative techniques and tasks that relate to computer-based crime, such as auditing network device log files, analyzing network traffic, and discovering web and denial of service attacks. The student will learn how to investigate Internet crimes, including various forms of e-mail crime.  Finally, the student will explore the topics of corporate espionage, copyright infringement, and sexual harassment incidents.  These topics will prepare the student to profile an intruder's footprint and gather all necessary information and evidence to support prosecution in a court of law.  47 contact hours.

CJE 1666   Operating Systems for Forensic Investigators

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: Permission of the program administrator, as well as basic computer skills, such as editing files, navigating a file system, and proficiency in the use of the Internet. This course is designed to teach the student the basic concepts of computer operating systems. The student will explain how operating systems manage memory by examining how operating systems use paging, virtual memory, and cache memory. The student will also explain how modern operating systems manage processes, including process deadlock, starvation, and race conditions. In addition, the student will explain how various system devices manage data. Finally, the student will be introduced to the most popular operating systems in use in the industry, including Unix, Linux, DOS, and Windows. 47 contact hours.

CJE 1669   IDENTITY THEFT INVESTIGATIONS

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Permission of Dean. This course will provide the student with the knowledge of the tools, procedures, resources, and appropriate laws necessary to investigate identity theft crimes. 47 contact hours.

CJE 1678   Introduction to Network Security for Computer-Related Crime Investigations

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: Permission of the program administrator, as well as basic computer skills, such as editing files, navigating a file system, and proficiency in the use of the Internet. This course will provide the student with knowledge of a network, security issues relating to networks and investigations regarding computer related crime investigations. 47 contact hours.

CJE 1680   INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER RELATED CRIME INVESTIGATIONS

credits: 3  
Prerequisites: Basic computer skills, proficiency in the use of the Internet and the permission of the program director. This course provides the student an overview of criminal acts that can be committed with the use of a computer and the Internet, how computer related crimes are committed and how computer related crimes are investigated. The legal issues involved in the prosecution of computer related crimes will also be explored. Topics include the Internet and investigative software tools. 47 contact hours.

CJE 1681   THE INTERNET AS AN INVESTIGATIVE TOOL

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Permission of Program Director. This course will instruct students in how to utilize a computer and advanced Internet search techniques as an investigative tool. Topics will include tracking individuals using email addresses, newsgroups, chat rooms, public record information and network addresses. 47 contact hours.

CJE 1682   TRACKING AND PROFILING HACKERS, PEDOPHILES AND INTERNET STALKERS

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Permission of Program Director. This course provides the student with the knowledge to track and profile hackers, pedophiles and Internet stalkers. Software tools and web sites used by investigators will be a part of this course. An overview of criminal acts committed by hackers, pedophiles and Internet stalkers will also be included in this course. 47 contact hours.

CJE 1683   INTERNET PORNOGRAPHY INVESTIGATIONS

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Permission of Program Director. This course will provide the student with the knowledge, tools and laws related to Internet pornography investigations. 47 contact hours.

CJE 1684   INTERNET FRAUD INVESTIGATIONS

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Permission of Program Director. This course will provide the student with the knowledge of the tools, procedures and appropriate laws necessary to investigate Internet fraud crimes. 47 contact hours.

CJE 1685   LEGAL ASPECTS OF COMPUTER RELATED CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Permission of Program Director. This course will provide the student the opportunity to learn the legal aspects of laws and codes that apply to computer related criminal investigations. Students will learn the elements required to prosecute computer related crimes including writing search warrants. 47 contact hours.

CJE 1686   FORENSIC COMPUTER RELATED CRIME INVESTIGATIONS

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Permission of Program Director. This course will introduce the student to the principles and practices required to obtain and preserve evidence in a forensics computer related crime investigation. Topics will also include the Internet and investigative software tools. 47 contact hours.

CJE 1687   COMPUTER SOFTWARE PIRACY AND COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Permission of Program Director. This course provides the student with an overview of the legal issues involved in computer software piracy and copyright infringement, the tools and technologies used in committing these offenses, and the investigative techniques that can be utilized to combat these crimes. 47 contact hours.

CJE 1770   CRIME SCENE PHOTOGRAPHY I

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017 or EAP 1695 or appropriate scores on the English and Reading placement tests. Pre- or corequisite: CJE 1640. This course includes basic crime scene photography skills including camera operation and exposure control, proficiency in relational photos and flash control for crime scene and evidentiary documentation. This course also includes videography. 47 contact hours.

CJE 1772   CRIME SCENE PHOTOGRAPHY II

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: CJE 1770. This course expands upon concepts, knowledge and skills taught in Crime Scene Photo I to include specialty light sources, darkroom techniques and procedures, filters and specialized equipment including black and white and color enlargers. 47 contact hours.

CJE 2020C   VEHICLE OPERATIONS

credits: 1  
Prerequisite: Program Director approval. This course explores the components of the police driving environment are explored, and practical exercises on the driving range are conducted. Objectives are addressed as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission. 32 contact hours.

CJE 2050   CRIMINAL JUSTICE DEFENSIVE TACTICS

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: Program Director approval. This course includes instruction in the techniques used for an officer's personal safety and those necessary to subdue, search, and then transport resisting individuals. The use of restraining devices, impact weapons, and pressure points are covered. Objectives are addressed as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission. 106 contact hours.

CJE 2054   CRIMINAL JUSTICE WEAPONS

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: Program Director approval. This course includes the use of officer firearms including handguns and shotguns. Safety procedures and ammunition use are covered. Instruction includes the use of chemical agents, with practical exercises included. Objectives are addressed as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission (CJSTC). 64 contact hours.

CJE 2234   DRUG INVESTIGATION METHODOLOGY

credits: 3  
This course provides students with an overview of investigative techniques used to identify criminal activity, specifically narcotic trafficking. This course explores the global issues associated with narcotic trafficking, as well as domestic interdiction efforts, the use of community-based solutions, and strategies to combat the criminal activity associated with illegal drugs. 47 contact hours.

CJE 2262   TECHNOLOGY AND GANG INTELLIGENCE SHARING

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Permission of the Dean. This course provides students with a working understanding of the technology available for communication; how that technology can be used by gangs and others inclined to engage in criminal activity; and how that technology can be used by police, courts, and corrections officers to identify criminal activity through intelligence collection, analysis, and dissemination. This course explores the historical use of technology, provides a sampling of technology available in the present, and looks at possibilities for improvements in the future. Students will learn to identify uses for technology, demonstrate a familiarity with available technology, and engage in collaboratively designing and using a technological framework to gather, analyze, and share simulated intelligence. 47 contact hours.

CJE 2453   CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERPERSONAL SKILLS II

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Program Director approval. This course explores the interpersonal skills needed by officers to understand the incarcerated society are explored, with emphasis upon supervision methods. Inmate adjustment and the various segments of the society are studied. The course includes studies of homosexuality, female inmates, deception and manipulation by inmates, and institutional criminalities. Objectives addressed include those as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission. 50 contact hours.

CJE 2552   LAW ENFORCEMENT TRAFFIC

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Program Director approval. This course includes traffic enforcement and control, with the inclusion of Driving Under the Influence (DUI) offenses and enforcement. Traffic accident investigation, scene management, and reporting procedures are studied. Objectives addressed include those as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission. 47 contact hours.

CJE 2590   LAW ENFORCEMENT PATROL

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Program Director approval. This course addresses the daily skills and techniques needed by officers to perform patrol tactics and respond to various types of calls. Methods of approach to various high-risk situations are explored, with practical exercises included. Unusual occurrence events, including firefighting and crowd control, are addressed. Objectives addressed include those as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission. 47 contact hours.

CJE 2601   LAW ENFORCEMENT INVESTIGATIONS

credits: 4  
Prerequisite: Program Director approval. This course addresses investigations of various crimes, including property crimes, persons crimes, narcotics offenses, vice, organized crime, terrorist activity, bombing incidents, and death investigations. Techniques are developed from the initial observation methods through the processing of the crime scene and case preparation. Florida's computer network is studied as an information source. Objectives addressed include those as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission. 64 contact hours.

CJE 2605   INVESTIGATIVE TRENDS

credits: 3  
This course will provide the student with the opportunity to explore in depth, specific crime typologies, national crime trends, and international events as well as view fundamental investigative techniques. In addition, the student will examine the rigorous methods, issues, and trends of criminal investigation. 47 contact hours.

CJE 2644   CRIME SCENE SAFETY

credits: 2  

Prerequisite: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017) or EAP 1695 or appropriate scores on the English and Reading placement tests. This course covers potential health and safety hazards one will encounter at a crime scene. The course will also introduce the proper protective techniques to minimize risk to self and others. Emergency procedures and state and federal regulations are included. 32 contact hours.

CJE 2645   INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC SCIENCE

credits: 3  

This course exposes the student to the capabilities and functions of a full-service crime laboratory. Also covered is evidence selection and submission to crime lab in accordance with established standards and legal requirements including chain of custody. 47 contact hours.

CJE 2671   LATENT FINGERPRINT DEVELOPMENT

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: CJE 2644, CJE 2676. Pre- or corequisites: CJE 1643, CJE 1772, CJL 2610, CJE 2645, CJE 2672. This course emphasizes the techniques involved in detection, enhancement and recovery of latent fingerprints from physical evidence. Chemical and mechanical methods and surfaces will be analyzed and evaluated for proper application in both theory and practice. 47 contact hours.

CJE 2672   FINGERPRINT CLASSIFICATION

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017) or EAP 1695 or appropriate scores on the English and Reading placement tests. This course teaches the Henry modified system of fingerprint classification and prepares the student for a position as an inked fingerprint examiner. 47 credit hours.

CJE 2673C   CRIME SCENE PHOTOGRAPHY

credits: 4  

Corequisite: CJE 1640  This course explains and covers crime scene photography skills, including camera operation, exposure control, proficiency in relational photos, and flash control for crime scene and evidentiary documentation. The course will also cover special light sources and the use of filters, specialized equipment, digital cameras, and hand held video camera-recorders. 62 contact hours.

CJE 2676   BIOLOGICAL EVIDENCE

credits: 2  

Prerequisite: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017) or EAP 1695 or appropriate scores on the English and Reading placement tests. This course exposes the student to the forensic value, handling, preservation, testing and documentation of biological evidence. This course also addresses safety issues involved in handling biological evidence. 32 contact hours.

CJE 2730   CORRECTIONAL EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

credits: 1  
Prerequisite: Program Director approval. This course is about the skills needed for riot and disturbance control and firefighting are studied and practiced. Course includes methods of riot prevention, handling of unusual occurrences, what to do if taken hostage, and emergency procedures. Objectives addressed include those as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission. 26 contact hours.

CJE 2940   INTERNSHIP

credits: 1-3  

Prerequisites: Approval of the College-wide Internship Office and Admission to Criminal Justice Technology Public Safety Services AS or Admission to Crime Scene Technology AS or Admission to Digital Forensics and Computer Investigations AS or Permission of Lead Instructor. This course provides the student with a supervised, practical learning experience in a work setting that is relevant to the Criminal Justice, Crime Scene, or Digital Forensics and Computer Crime program of study. Through course assignments and workplace projects the student will apply, connect, and extend academic theory and competencies for the purpose of building professional skills and affiliations. (60-180 contact hours).

 

CJE 3263   INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZED CRIME

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Public Safety Administration BAS program. This course will provide the student with an awareness of the impact of international gangs, organized crime and terrorism on the United States and globally. The student will examine the undermining of nations’ financial institutions, homeland security and global networking capabilities of international gangs, organized crime and terrorist groups. The student will analyze the historical and regulatory factors that contributed to creating domestic and international gangs and organized crime in Eastern Europe and Asia, and the impact of organized crime groups, particularly Italian, Asian, Russian, Israeli, Albanian, Colombian, Mexican, African, Canadian and outlaw motorcycle gangs. The course will deal with international issues including money laundering, drug trafficking, human trafficking, contract assassinations, transnational terrorism, arms trafficking, cyberspace fraud and corruption of political and police officials. 47 contact hours.

CJE 3264   SUPERVISING TACTICAL GANG UNITS AND HIGH RISK OPERATIONS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Public Safety Administration BAS program. This course will provide the student an opportunity to explore and analyze administrative and operational issues in supervising law enforcement tactical units and high risk operations involving gang enforcement. The student will develop effective leadership skills required to select, train, and supervise tactical units that have responsibility for gang enforcement operations. The learning experience provides the student with knowledge to effectively evaluate the performance of the gang tactical units and their impact on the community. The student will develop skills to effectively plan and evaluate high risk operations that are carried out by a gang’s enforcement unit. 47 contact hours.

CJE 3341   PATROL ISSUES IN LAW ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION

credits: 3  
This course will provide the student an opportunity to explore and understand one facet of law enforcement service delivery. The student will focus on agency implementation requirements and overall program effectiveness while evaluating community satisfaction. This process will enhance the student's ability to research program needs, examine budgetary requirements for implementation and measure the program's effectiveness from a crime reduction and prevention standpoint . 47 contact hours.

CJE 3361   MANAGEMENT OF SPECIALIZED LAW ENFORCEMENT UNITS

credits: 3  
This course will provide the student an opportunity to explore and understand specialized facets of law enforcement service delivery. The student will focus on agency implementation of public safety, crime reduction, and/or community relation initiatives, evaluating program effectiveness and community impact. This process will enhance the student's ability to research program needs, examine budgetary requirements for implementation, and measure the program's effectiveness from a viability standpoint. 47 contact hours.

CJE 3611   CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS THEORY AND PRACTICE

credits: 3  
This course will give the student an opportunity to explore and understand investigative facets of law enforcement service delivery. The student must focus on agency implementation of investigative initiatives and overall program effectiveness while evaluating prosecution success and community impact. This process will enhance the student's ability to research program needs, examine budgetary requirements for implementation, and measure the program's effectiveness from a crime solvability standpoint. 47 contact hours.

CJE 4693   GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS IN GANG ENFORCEMENT

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the PSA-BAS program. This course will provide the student with an understanding of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology which has become an important component in crime analysis, trend formation, informing policies and administrative practices in law enforcement. This course is designed to introduce students to the key concepts and uses of GIS and Geographic Positioning Systems (GPS) in operational and managerial environments. Students will become familiar with the benefits of utilizing these technological tools in criminal justice research and crime analysis, with a particular focus on gang enforcement. In addition, students will review various case studies and their use in criminal justice research and gang enforcement operations and management. 47 contact hours.

CJL 2062   CONSTITUTIONAL LAW AND RULES OF EVIDENCE

credits: 3  
A survey of Constitutional Law and Criminal Procedure. Topics include: the Bill of Rights, the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, the laws of arrest, search, and seizure, right to counsel, self-incrimination, entrapment and identification of suspects. 47 contact hours.

CJL 2103   CRIMINAL JUSTICE LEGAL III

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: Program Director approval. This course is about various criminal laws and their elements are studied. Emphasis is placed upon those laws specific to police application. Traffic and driver's license laws are studied. Legal considerations of officer vehicle operation are explored. Objectives addressed include those as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission. 32 contact hours.

CJL 2134   FORENSIC FINANCIAL INVESTIGATION

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Permission of Program Director. This course will provide students with the background and history of fraud and monetary abuse and will introduce fraud schemes used by employees, owners, managers and executives to defraud their companies. Fraud topics include asset misappropriations, and fraudulent financial statements. 47 contact hours.

CJL 2610   COURTROOM PRESENTATION OF SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: CJE 2644, CJE 2676. Pre- or corequisites: CJE 1643, CJE 1772, CJE 2645, CJE 2672. This course covers speaking, listening and stress control during courtroom proceedings, dress and grooming. Visual aid preparation and presentations of all evidence (commonly referred to as "scientific evidence") collected at the crime scene are also included. Mock trial exercises will be used. 47 contact hours.

CLP 2140   ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: PSY 1012 or PSY 1020H. An examination of the major categories of mental disorders. Diagnostic criterion, treatment methods, and legislation applicable to the emotionally disturbed are studied. Local agencies which provide services to the mentally disordered are reviewed. This course has a substantial writing requirement. 47 contact hours.

CLT 2373   ANCIENT GREEK MYTHOLOGY

credits: 3  
This course will acquaint the student with the world of mythological gods and heroes of the Ancient Greeks. Literature, art and archaeology will be examined, as well as lifestyles and ideas of the Ancient Greek civilization. 47 contact hours.

CNT 1000   LOCAL AREA NETWORK CONCEPTS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: COP 1000. This is a course designed to introduce the student to various local area network (LAN) concepts and wide area network (WAN) technologies. Major topics include a history of local area networks, the OSI and TCP/IP models, terms, acronyms, standards, protocols, hardware and software products. 47 contact hours.

CNT 2940   COMPUTER NETWORKING INTERNSHIP

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Student must have completed a minimum of 15 credits of major coursework. The purpose of this course is to allow students a “real world” experience with major-related, supervised, evaluated practical work experiences which may be paid or voluntary. Students are graded on the basis of documented learning acquired through hands-on experiences in an actual work setting.The student must fulfill the requirement of 180 on-the-job hours in addition to written assignments. 

COM 3120   ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION

credits: 3  

Prerequisite or corequisite:  ENC 1102, ENC 1122H, AML 1600, AML 2010, AML 2010H, AML 2020, AML 2020H, ENL 2012, ENL 2012H, ENL 2022, LIT 2110, LIT 2110H, LIT 2120, LIT 2120H.

Prerequisite:  (SPC 1017, SPC 1017H, SPC 1065 or SPC 1608) and (admission to Banking BAS, International Business BAS, Management & Organizational Leadership BAS, Sustainability Management BAS, Technology Management BAS, Public Safety Administration BAS, Public Policy and Administration BS, or Educational Studies BS)

This course will examine the process of communication within organizations. The topics of message dissemination, interpersonal communication, work group interaction, and nonverbal communication will be analyzed as to their impact on individuals and the organization. Emphasis will be placed on practical application techniques for diagnosing and resolving organizational communication problems. This course will also have a major writing requirement focusing on practical business writing techniques. 47 contact hours.

COM 3131   INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION FOR PROFESSIONALS

credits: 3  
Prerequisites: SPC 1017, SPC 1065, SPC 1608 or Honors and Admission to Business Administration BS. This course explores communication within the context of professional interpersonal relationships. Topics include interpersonal communication concepts, monitoring the internal and external environmental factors in a professional interpersonal relationship, determining the relational context, identifying the appropriate communication channel for interpersonal exchanges, and reducing unintended messages. Students will demonstrate their understanding of diversity in their professional interpersonal relationships. Major course requirements are a formal presentation and a written analysis of an identified characteristic in interpersonal communicative exchanges. 47 contact hours.

COM 3441   GROUP COMMUNICATION AND TEAM INTERACTION

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: COM 3120 or permission of the Dean. This course explores communication within groups and teams for use in academic, professional, and social situations. Topics include verbal and nonverbal communication within groups, the structure and environment of groups, group roles, leadership, conflict management, and decision making in groups and teams. A major course requirement is a formal group presentation and a written analysis of the group processes and experiences. 47 contact hours.

COM 3604   ENVIRONMENTAL COMMUNICATION

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: SPC 1017, SPC 1608 or SPC 1065 or Honors and admission into the Sustainability Management BAS Program. This course examines environmental communication for sustainable/green and environmental careers and practices. Topics include the rhetoric of environmental issues, the application of the transactional human communication model to advocacy campaigns, developing and conveying possible solutions, managing conflict between stakeholders, assessing green marketing and corporate campaigns, and developing persuasive techniques. A major course requirement is to present a formal proposal and persuasive presentation based an environmental practice or initiative. 47 contact hours.

COP 1000   INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER PROGRAMMING

credits: 3  

This course is an introduction to the concepts of data processing, computers, and development of a logical approach to programming. Topics covered include a brief discussion of the historical development of data processing and computing concepts, basic computer terminology, the architecture of modern computer systems, computer communications, computer data representation and organization, numbering systems used in computers, computer operating systems, flowcharting and/or pseudocode, and program development using an appropriate computer language and Integrated Development Environment (IDE). 

COP 1822   INTRODUCTION TO WEB PAGE CREATION

credits: 1  

Prerequisite: Computer competence and knowledge of Internet use. This course is designed to introduce an experienced computer user to the tools necessary to create a web site. Students will be exposed to the protocol and vocabulary of web production, and apply HTML to the development of a World Wide Web site. Students will be introduced to a variety of site features including GIF and JPEG files, audio, video, animation, and interactivity. The student will have the opportunity to develop a web site from initial concept to publication. 16 contact hours.

COP 1831   WEB SCRIPTING WITH CGI/PERL

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: CGS 2823 and COP 1000 both with a minimum grade of C. This course will introduce students to Web scripting with the Common Gateway Interface (CGI) and Practical Extract and Reporting Language (Perl). Students will develop CGI scripts that read HTML forms and generate output. Topics will include Perl control structures, loops, arrays,hashes, functions, cookies, regular expressions, text files, and database access with Structured Query Language (SQL). 47 contact hours.

COP 1842   DEVELOPING WEB SITES USING PHP/MySQL

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CGS 2823 and COP 1000 both with a minimum grade fo C. This course will teach students necessary skills to effectively implement dynamic Web sites using PHP HyperText Preprocessor (PHP) and MySQL. Topics include configuring PHP and MySQL, reading HTML forms, variables and strings, selections, loops, arrays, text files, cookies and sessions, functions, regular expressions, connecting to a MySQL database, writing basic Structured Query Language (SQL) commands, and developing applications with PHP/MySQL. 47 contact hours.

COP 2222   ADVANCED C++ PROGRAMMING FOR BUSINESS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CGS 2402 with a minimum grade of C. This is an advanced programming course in the C++ language. Emphasis is placed on programming using classes and structures in C++. Topics covered will include classes, structures, and exception handling. 47 contact hours.

COP 2250   JAVA PROGRAMMING I

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: COP 1000. This is a beginning programming course in the Java language. The student will learn to design, document, prepare, enter, compile, debug and execute Java applications and applets of moderate sophistication. Major topics covered include: Java classes, object-oriented programming, exception handling, interfaces, data types, data structures, text file input/output and an introduction to Swing Graphical User Interfaces (GUI). 47 contact hours.

COP 2251   JAVA PROGRAMMING II

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: COP 2250. This course will teach students to write advanced Java programs. Topics include Swing Graphical User Interface (GUI) applications, advanced layout managers, Swing applets, threads, regular expressions, collections, Java networking, Remote Method Invocation (RMI), JavaBeans, Java Database Connectivity (JDBC), Internationalization (I18N) and Localization (L10N), and Java security. Students will write complete applications and small Java applets. 47 contact hours.

COP 2360   INTRODUCTION TO C# PROGRAMMING

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: COP 1000. This course is a study of the C# (C Sharp) programming language within the.NET Framework. Emphasis is placed upon the position of.NET in software development and creation of.NET applications by applying the base library classes and developing and applying user-defined classes in the WinForm applications using C#. 47 contact hours.

COP 2362   ADVANCED PROGRAMMING WITH C#

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: COP 2360.  This is an advanced programming course in the C# language. Emphasis is placed on programming using classes and structures in C#. Topics covered will include classes, structures, an introduction to Windows programming, ADO.NET and ASP.NET using C#. 47 contact hours

COP 2654   iOS APP DEVELOPMENT

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CGS 2402 with a minimum grade of C. This is an introductory course in application development for iOS devices. Students will study the Objective-C language and observe Apple standard design patterns including Model-View-Controller (MVC). The Xcode Integrated Development Environment (IDE) will be used to create and test a number of apps. Web-based app development tools will also be introduced. Students will learn how to provision their apps to their own iOS devices and for distribution to the AppStore. An Apple desktop or laptop is required for this course. For face-to-face and blended classes the course is taught in a Apple computer lab. Online students must own, or have access to, an Apple computer. Students will benefit greatly by owning an iPhone, iPad, or iPod Touch but this is not compulsory since the software includes a simulator. 47 contact hours.

COP 2660   INTRODUCTION TO ANDROID PROGRAMMING

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: COP 2250. This is an introductory course in Android application development for smartphones and tablets. Students will use the Android Software Development Kit (SDK) with Java and Eclipse to create and test apps on the Android emulator and on their own Android devices. Topics include user interface layouts and views, activities, intents, fragments, data persistence with files, SQLite databases, networking and location-based services. Students will also learn how to publish apps that they have created. 47 contact hours.

COP 2801   JAVASCRIPT

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: COP 1000 and CGS 1831. This course will teach students to write JavaScript programs that can be executed by the major Web browsers. These programs will be created using this object-based scripting language. Students will conceptualize and develop interactive web pages using strings, arrays, built-in functions, user-defined functions, control structures, looping structures, and cookies. 47 contact hours.

COP 2806   JAVA SERVER PAGES AND SERVLETS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: COP 2250. This course provides students with the skills needed to develop Web applications using Java. The course will cover Java Server Pages (JSP) features including scriptlets, directives, standard actions, declarations, the JSP Standard Tag Library (JSTL), custom JSP tags, the JSP Expression Language (EL), custom error pages, sessions, javabeans, and cookies. The Java Servlet Application Program Interface (API) is also covered. Students will learn to create simple JavaBeans for JSPs. Applications that query databases using Java Database Connectivity (JDBC) and Structured Query Language (SQL) will be developed. 47 contact hours.

COP 2823   ADVANCED WEB PAGE CREATION

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CGS 1831 or permission of program administrator. This course is designed to extend the knowledge gained in Introduction to Web Page Creation. Students will be exposed to advanced topics in developing Web sites. These topics include advanced design using tables and forms, creating on-line forms with HTML, and using Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) to design Web pages. Students will also be exposed to the latest developments in terms of Web page design. These topics include Dynamic HTML and Extendable Markup Language (XML). 47 contact hours.

COP 2837   VISUAL BASIC.NET PROGRAMMING I

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: COP 1000.  This course includes an introduction to the.NET framework and the class libraries for developing Visual Basic applications. Visual Basic building blocks, language syntax and programming structures will be emphasized through development of Windows applications using forms and controls. 47 contact hours.

COP 2838   VISUAL BASIC.NET PROGRAMMING II

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: COP 2837.  This course is a continuation of Visual Basic.Net Programming I with the development of Windows applications using forms and classes. ActiveX Data Objects.NET (ADO.NET) is used to access databases and blend them into an application program as sources of data. Web service applications and Web Forms are developed. 47 contact hours.

COP 2839   ASP.NET PROGRAMMING WITH C#/VB.NET

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: COP 2837 or COP 2360. This course is the study of the creation of Web server based components to generate Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) using Active Server Pages.NET (ASP.NET) in a Visual Basic.NET programming environment. ASP.NET programs are created using an event driven programming model. Server controls and Web forms are studied in depth. 47 contact hours.

COP 2840   SCRIPTING FOR BROWSERS

credits: 2  

Prerequisites: COP 1000, COP 2823. This course will explore various Internet programming such as VBScript, JavaScript, ECMAScript, Perl and CGI in order to create dynamic Web applications using both client-side and server-side scripting technologies. The students will become familiar with Active Server Pages (ASP) to process form data from the client and discover how to use ASP to interact with other applications on the server and other databases. 32 contact hours.

COP 2843   ADVANCED PHP/MySQL

credits: 3  
Prerequisites: COP 1842. This course extends the study of PHP and MySQL begun in COP 1842, Developing Web Sites Using PHP/MySQL. Topics include MySQL transactions and stored procedures, authentication and authorization, using PEAR, PHP and MySQL security, networking applications, session control, templates, serialization, the CodeIgniter framework, XML and web services, Google maps, Amazon scripts, and shopping carts. 47 contact hours.

COP 2940   COMPUTER PROGRAMMING INTERNSHIP

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Students must have completed a minimum of 15 credits of major coursework. The purpose of this course is to allow students a “real world” experience with major-related, supervised, evaluated practical work experiences which may be paid or voluntary. Students are graded on the basis of documented learning acquired through hands-on experiences in an actual work setting. The student must fulfill the requirement of 180 on-the-job hours in addition to written assignments. 

COP 3022   INTERMEDIATE COMPUTER PROGRAMMING

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: COP 1000 with a minimum grade of C.   As an intermediate level computer programming course, students will build upon their programming knowledge and skills by using an appropriate programming language to plan, code, and debug computer programs. Course topics include string operations and manipulation, dictionaries, sets, classes and objects, inheritance, recursion, and Graphical User Interface (GUI) programming. 47 contact hours.

COP 4416   ALGORITHMIC DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT

credits: 3  

Requisites:  COP 3022 with a minimum grade of C and admission to TMGT-BAS.  This course exposes the student to the topics of data structures, algorithms, algorithm design and analysis by focusing on design methods and efficiency analysis. Methods start with brute force, divide-and-conquer and then move on to more difficult ideas like dynamic programming and greedy technique. Popular puzzles are used to motivate students' interest and strengthen their skills in algorithmic problem solving. This is an advanced level programming course and it is recommended that students have completed a lower level programming language. 47 contact hours.

COP 4504   ADVANCED SOFTWARE PROGRAMMING

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: COP 3022 with a minimum grade of C and Admission to TMGT-BAS.  This course covers advanced concepts of computer programming including object-oriented programming, procedural and data implementation and program modularity. This is an advanced level programming course and it is recommended that students have completed a lower level programming language. 47 contact hours.

CPO 2002   COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: POS 2041. This course is a comparative study of selected countries and their political systems. The course will examine forms of government, institutions, political culture, policymaking processes and contemporary problems. 47 contact hours.

CRW 2001   CREATIVE WRITING

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: ENC 1101 or ENC 1121H. This course is offered for students desiring experience in such forms as the short story, poetry, the novel, etc. and is conducted under workshop conditions. The class will discuss outstanding contemporary writers’ work as patterns and also read and analyze the student writing assignments. Each student may specialize in one literary form in a term project, as determined in conference with the instructor. This course has a substantial writing requirement. 47 contact hours.

CRW 2100   FICTION WORKSHOP

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CRW 2001 or permission of the dean. This course, offered for students desiring experience in the writing of fiction, is conducted under workshop conditions. The class will discuss outstanding contemporary fiction writers' work as positive examples, explore the elements of both short stories and novels, and analyze student fiction in a workshop situation. Term project will consist of a collection of stories or part of a novel, the parameters of which will be determined by the instructor. This course has a substantial writing requirement. 47 contact hours.

CRW 2300   POETRY WORKSHOP

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CRW 2001 or permission of the dean. This course, offered for students desiring experience in the writing of poetry, is conducted under workshop conditions. The class will discuss outstanding contemporary poets' work as positive examples, explore the elements of both formal and free verse poetry, and analyze student poetry in a workshop situation. Term project will consist of a collection of poems, the parameters of which will be determined by the instructor. This course has a substantial writing requirement. 47 contact hours.

CTS 1001   FUNDAMENTALS OF INFORMATION STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CET 2620 or CTS 1303.  This course covers modern storage infrastructure technology and management including: challenges and solutions for data storage and data management, intelligent storage systems, storage networking, backup, recovery, and archive, business continuity (BC) and disaster recovery, security and virtualization, managing and monitoring the storage infrastructure. Best practices for security policies of cloud resources including permissions, privileges and storage management are analyzed and performed. 47 contact hours.

CTS 1120   INTRODUCTION TO NETWORK SECURITY FOUNDATIONS

credits: 3  
It is recommended that students have prior computer network training or experience. This course provides the student with an overview of Information Technology (IT) Security and introduces the components necessary to secure network information systems. Topics include security policies, intrusion detection systems (IDS), firewalls, operating system security and network security basics. Students will also be introduced to current hacker techniques and log auditing processes. Current computer security issues will also be explored as class projects. 47 contact hours.

CTS 1302   DESIGNING A WINDOWS SERVER ACTIVE DIRECTORY INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CTS 1303. This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to design a Windows Server Active Directory infrastructure. This course focuses on the imporatanc eof analyzing business requirements as a basis for designing an effective Active Directory infrastructrue. The course also emphasizes how to design Active Directory forests, the domain infrastructure, sites and replication, administrative structures, group policies, and Public Key Infrastructures. This course may be repeated up to three (3) times with a different version of the software which has a substantial or significant change in the software. 47 contact hours.

CTS 1303   CONFIGURING ADVANCED WINDOWS SERVER SERVICES

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CTS 1334 with a minimum grade of C. This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to successfully configure advanced services in a distributed Windows Server environment.. The course focuses on advanced configuration of services necessary to deploy, manage and maintain a Windows Server infrastructure, such as advanced networking services, Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS), identity management, rights management, Federated services, network load balancing, failover clustering, business continuity, and disaster recovery. This course may be repeated up to three (3) times with a different version of the software which has a substantial or significant change. 

CTS 1314   NETWORK DEFENSE AND COUNTERMEASURES

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CTS 1120 with a minimum grade of C. This course will explore concepts of network defense and countermeasures as well as hardware and software required to design, configure and implement secure networks. Security topics covered in this course include firewalls, Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS), Virtual Private Networks (VPN) and policy creation using the Windows 2000 Operating System (OS), Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) packet and signature analysis. The student will get hands-on instruction installing the network defense mechanisms and countermeasure applications. Software will be used for collecting, monitoring and auditing various activities; students will analyze threats and intrusions. Multiple business scenarios will be reviewed to determine which security policy provides the most protection at an acceptable level of risk in order to conduct business. The student will be able to determine differences between network based and host based IDSs as well as the various types of firewalls such as Bastion Host and Proxy Servers. VPN solutions will be developed on the Windows 2000 Operating System. Win 2K, Linux and Unix will be examined and compared to understand the differences in protection capabilities. 47 contact hours.

CTS 1327   CONFIGURING AND ADMINISTERING MS WINDOWS CLIENT

credits: 3  

The purpose of this course is to address the implementation and desktop support needs of customers that are planning to deploy and support Microsoft Windows Client. The course focuses on four main areas: installing; securing; networking; and mobile computing features. Additionally, this course addresses the customers’ need for knowledgeable personnel that can support desktops running Microsoft Windows Client Operating Systems. This course may be repeated up to three (3) times with a different version of the software which has a substantial or significant change. The cost of the textbook is included in the lab fee. 47 contact hours.

CTS 1328   INSTALLING AND CONFIGURING WINDOWS SERVER

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CTS 1327 with a minimum grade of C. This course teaches students the fundamentals of implementing and configuring core services including Active Directory Domain Services (Ad DS), networking, services, and Microsoft Hpyer-V server using Windows Servers. It is intended to provide the skills and knowledge necessary to implement a core Windows Server infrastructure in an existing enterprise environment. This course may be repeated up to three (3) times with a different version of the software, which has a substantial or significant change. 

CTS 1334   ADMINISTERING WINDOWS SERVERS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CTS 1328 with a minimum grade of C. The goal of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to implement a core Windows server network infrastructure in an existing enterprise environment. The course is intended for systems administrator or systems engineer candidates who are responsible for administration tasks necessary to maintain a Windows Server infrastructure. This course may be repeated up to three (3) times using a different version of the software that has a substantial or significant change. 

CTS 2001   CONFIGURING AND MANAGING VIRTUALIZATION

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CTS 1001 with a minimum grade of C.  This course equips students with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to build and run a virtualized networking environment. It focuses on the installation and configuration of various virtual hosts and virtual servers. It also focuses on the management of virtualized hosts and virtual machines using various hypervisors. This course helps prepare students to achieve the status of VMware® Certified Professional. 47 contact hours.

CTS 2106   FUNDAMENTALS OF THE LINUX/UNIX OPERATING ENVIRONMENT

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: COP 1000 with a minimum grade of C. This course is designed to teach students how to use basic Linux/Unix Operating System commands. The course is for new users of the Linux/Unix Operating System. Students learn file system navigation, file permissions, text editors, and command line administrative tasks. Major topics covered include accessing files and directories, executing directory and file commands, searching for files and text, file system security, text editing, archiving user data, remote connections, system processes, and text filtering commands and accessibility technologies. 47 contact hours.

CTS 2321   LINUX SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION I

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CTS 2106. This course is designed to teach students the skills required to effectively administer Linux servers. Students will plan, setup, administer and perform support tasks. Major topics covered include file administration, shell scripts, managing user accounts, and security procedures. 47 contact hours.

CTS 2322   LINUX SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION II

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: CTS 2321. A continuation of Linux System Administration I, this course is designed to teach students the skills they need to effectively administer Linux servers. Students will plan, install, and perform support tasks related to their Linux server. Students will configure basic network protocols and share resources . Major topics covered include file system, printers, Common Unix Printing Service (CUPS), SAMBA, boot and backup options, network and security services, software administration, and troubleshooting general printing problems. 47 contact hours.

CTS 2433   SQL DATABASE DESIGN AND PROGRAMMING

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: COP 1000. This course is designed to familiarize individuals with the SQL relational database including database programming and development. A series of database application projects using SQL software is designed to build familiarity with e-r database modeling, database creation, database programming, and database optimization. Database architectures including the client/server model and distributed database model are presented. The objective is to build a working knowledge and hands-on familiarity with SQL. 47 Contact Hours

CTS 2940   IT SECURITY INTERNSHIP

credits: 1-4  

Prerequisite: Student must have completed a minimum of 15 credits of major coursework. The purpose of this course is to allow students a “real world” experience with major-related, supervised, evaluated practical work experiences which may be paid or voluntary. Students are graded on the basis of documented learning acquired through hands-on experiences in an actual work setting. The student must fulfill the requirement of 180 on-the-job hours in addition to written assignments. 


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