Course List


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EAP 0200   BASIC LISTENING/SPEAKING

credits: 3  
College Preparatory Credits (0000 designations) may not be used toward graduation credits. This course is offered to students with an appropriate score on the standardized placement test for ESL. The course develops the students’ ability to comprehend spoken English at a normal rate of speech and to express themselves accurately in a variety of situations. Emphasis is on listening for content, intonation, and rhythm patterns, imitating native speakers of English, and choosing appropriate expressions to handle everyday social encounters. 62 contact hours.

EAP 0295   BASIC ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE I

credits: 9  
College Preparatory Credits (0000 designations) may not be used toward graduation credits. This course is offered to students with an appropriate score on the standardized placement test for ESL. This course is for non-native speakers of English and is the first of the five ESL courses in written English. It is designed to develop skills in vocabulary, reading, grammar, and writing. In this course, students develop writing skills in the context of guided discourse on personal topics with an emphasis on logical thought and mechanics, and they learn to control basic grammatical structures and statement/question patterns. They also develop the ability to comprehend written text appropriate to this level with emphasis on developing reading skills and vocabulary. A variety of American and cross-cultural topics are discussed. 137 contact hours.

EAP 0300   INTERMEDIATE LISTENING/SPEAKING I

credits: 3  
College Preparatory Credits (0000 designations) may not be used toward graduation credits. Prerequisite: EAP 0200 or an appropriate score on the standardized placement test for ESL. In this course students will further develop the ability to comprehend spoken English and to express themselves more accurately and fluently on a variety of social and academic topics. They develop speaking and listening skills necessary for participating in classroom discussions with an emphasis on clarification through rewording and asking questions. Emphasis is on active listening for discrete points and main ideas and summarizing. 62 contact hours.

EAP 0395   BASIC ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE II

credits: 9  
College Preparatory Credits (0000 designations) may not be used toward graduation credits. Prerequisite: EAP 0295 or appropriate score on the standardized placement test for ESL. This college preparatory course for non-native speakers of English is the second of the four ESL courses in written English. It is designed to develop skills in vocabulary, reading, grammar, and writing. A variety of American and cross-cultural topics are discussed. 137 contact hours.

EAP 0400   INTERMEDIATE LISTENING/SPEAKING II

credits: 3  
College Preparatory Credits (0000 designations) may not be used toward graduation credits. Prerequisite: EAP 0300 or an appropriate score on the standardized placement test for ESL. In this course students will continue to develop speaking and listening skills necessary for participation in classroom discussions, oral presentations, and an introduction to critical listening skills. Emphasis is on active listening for discrete points and main ideas, note taking, summarizing, and giving prepared and extemporaneous speeches. 62 contact hours.

EAP 0495   INTERMEDIATE ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

credits: 9  
College Preparatory Credits (0000 designations) may not be used toward graduation credits. Prerequisite: EAP 0395 or an appropriate score on the standardized placement test for ESL. The third of five ESL courses, this college preparatory course is designed to enhance basic skills in reading, writing, structure, and vocabulary building. Students develop the ability to write more sophisticated structured academic paragraphs in various rhetorical modes and execute other academic writing tasks. They continue to develop academic reading abilities, including texts on contemporary and literary topics with an emphasis on extensive reading and the enhancement of critical reading skills. They also develop the ability to use intermediate-level grammatical structures appropriate to classroom discussion, oral presentation and writing of more sophisticated academic paragraphs with an emphasis on increased accuracy. Group interaction, critical thinking skills, and appreciation of cultural differences in learning approaches are incorporated in instructional techniques. 137 contact hours.

EAP 1500   ADVANCED LISTENING/SPEAKING

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: EAP 0400 or an appropriate score on the standardized placement test for ESL. Students enhance their aural comprehension skills in both academic and social settings by listening to taped lectures and news broadcasts, radio and television shows, and guest speakers. They develop communication, organization and pronunciation skills necessary for effective academic presentation and discussion with an introduction to lecture note taking. Emphasis is also placed on accent reduction as students focus on sound discrimination and oral production of English. Oral communication skills are further developed as students practice interviewing, summarizing, and giving presentations and take part in group problem-solving activities. 62 contact hours. (A total of 12 credits from EAP 1695 and EAP 1500 can be used for graduation credit.)

EAP 1501   ENGLISH PRONUNCIATION

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: EAP 0400 or an appropriate score on the standardized placement test for ESL or by permission of the program director. This course is designed to improve students' pronunciation of American English, including stress, rhythm, and intonation. Students analyze the phonetic structure of vowel and consonant sounds and practice correctly pronouncing sounds and patterns in context. 47 contact hours.

EAP 1595   ADVANCED ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE I

credits: 9  
Prerequisite: EAP 0495 or an appropriate score on the standardized placement test for ESL. The fourth of five ESL courses, this college preparatory course is designed to enhance advanced skills in reading, writing, structure, and vocabulary building. Students develop the ability to write structured academic essays with an emphasis on accuracy and cohesiveness and execute other academic writing tasks. They develop the ability to comprehend lengthier texts on diverse academic topics by applying appropriate reading strategies, and they develop the ability to use complex grammatical structures appropriate to effective academic discourse, including discussions and essays. Group interaction, critical thinking skills, and appreciation of cultural differences in learning approaches are incorporated in instructional techniques. 137 contact hours. (NOTE: Credit for EAP 1595 cannot be used toward graduation.)

EAP 1695   ADVANCED ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE II

credits: 9  
Prerequisite: EAP 1595 or an appropriate score on the standardized placement test for ESL. As the last course in English as a Second Language, this component is designed to increase and refine skills in reading speed, comprehension and retention; in writing organization, fluency, clarity and style; and in understanding and applying advanced grammatical concepts to enhance both comprehension and expression in English. Group interaction, critical thinking skills and appreciation of cultural differences in learning approaches are incorporated in instructional techniques. 137 contact hours. (A total of 12 credits from EAP 1695 and EAP 1500 can be used for graduation credit.)

EAP 1696L   ESL LABORATORY

credits: 1  
Corequisite: ENC 1101. This course is a learning support laboratory for ESL students who have successfully completed EAP 1695 (Advanced English as a Second Language) with a letter grade of C or who have permission of the Program Director. The laboratory will assist students in identifying and correcting specific weaknesses in English language skills and composing skills. With individualized tutorial instruction, students will revise essays written for the co-requisite course. Additional learning activities will be assigned as needed for review and reinforcement and must be completed satisfactorily. 32 contact hours. (This course does not count toward graduation credit.)

ECO 2000   INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: (ENC 0025 or ENC 0990 or ENC 0025) and (REA 0017 or REA 0990 or REA 0017) or EAP 1695 or satisfactory score on the SPC Placement Test. This course is designed to provide students with a general knowledge of the structure and function of economic systems with major emphasis on the American economy and its current economic problems. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. 47 contact hours.

ECO 2013   PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017) or EAP 1695 or appropriate score on the placement test. This is a course in economic principles involving the overall operation of the market economy. Particular attention will be given to the effects of aggregate demand and aggregate supply on the levels of output, employment, and prices. This course will also examine how the tools of fiscal and monetary policy may be used in dealing with macroeconomics problems such as unemployment, inflation and economic fluctuation. This course partially satisfies the Gordon Rule writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. Credit is not given for both ECO 2013 and Honors Macroeconomics. 47 contact hours.

ECO 2013H   HONORS MACROECONOMICS

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: Meets Honors College entrance criteria or approval of program director. In this course macroeconomic principles are used to analyze the operation of the market economy. The course will examine the effects of fiscal and monetary policies on aggregate demand and aggregate supply and consequently on the levels of output, employment, and prices. Emphasis will be placed on discussion of contemporary macroeconomic problems and issues. This course partially satisfies the Gordon Rule writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. Credit is not given for both ECO 2013 and Honors Macroeconomics. 47 contact hours.

ECO 2023   PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: (ECO 2013 or ECO 2013H) or (special permission of the program director). This course is a study involving the theory of the business firm in the market economy. Major emphasis will be placed on the theory of price and output determination under different market situations, as well as consumer demand and behavior in market economies. This course partially satisfies the Gordon Rule writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. Credit is not given for both ECO 2023 and ECO 2023H. 47 contact hours.

ECO 2023H   HONORS MICROECONOMICS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Meets Honors College entrance criteria or approval of program director. Microeconomic principles are used to analyze the operation of the market economy. The course will examine the theory of price and output determination under different market structures. Emphasis will be placed on discussion of contemporary microeconomic problems and issues. This course partially satisfies the Gordon Rule writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. Credit is not given for both ECO 2023 and ECO 2023H. 47 contact hours.

ECP 3703   MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

credits: 3  
Prerequisites: ECO 2013, ECO 2023, STA 2023 and Admission to the Business Administration BS Program. This course applies economic theory and methodology to managerial decision making in various organizational settings. This course will emphasize demand analysis, production, and cost analysis under different market conditions, and decision making under uncertainty. 47 contact hours.

ECT 4004   HISTORY AND PRINCIPLES OF CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: This course is an overview of current policies and principles in career and technical education including the historical, sociological, and philosophical bases. Topics include the impact of legislation, role of career and technical education in promoting democratic ideals, administrative structures at the national, state and district level, role of advisory committees, professional educator and student organizations, and critical issues affecting career and technical education. It is one of the four courses required to complete the professional preparation requirements for newly employed career and technical education instructors. 47 contact hours.

ECT 4183   CURRICULUM CONSTRUCTION: INDUSTRIAL-TECHNICAL EDUCATION

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: This course is designed to assist new Career and Technical (CTE) teachers on temporary certification, to develop or expand their skills in constructing a comprehensive curriculum for career and technical classrooms and laboratories. It will focus on translating the CTE instructor’s occupational knowledge and experience with the academic goals and objectives of their program into a coherent series of efficient and effective learning experiences for students. Selected course topics include evaluation of curriculum resources, development of self-instructional learning materials, service learning projects, teacher with-it-ness and program culminating projects.

ECT 4365   BASIC TEACHING METHODS: CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION

credits: 3  

This course is designed to assist in-service career and technical teachers, on temporary teacher certification, to develop or expand their skill in planning and delivering effective instruction in the career and technical classroom and laboratory. The course focuses on the selection of teaching methods for specific instructional settings including principles of learning, instructional strategies, teacher collaboration, instructional media, classroom management and assessment. Access to the Internet and familiarity with email procedures are necessary. 47 contact hours.

ECT 4562   CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION FOR STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

credits: 3  

This course provides an overview of the rationale, legal and social foundations, and characteristics of education for students with special needs. It focuses on modifying the career and technical education curriculum, laboratory, shop, student outcomes, learning activities, tests, media, etc. to accommodate the unique learning needs of non-traditional, English as a Second Language and special needs students. Access to the Internet and familiarity with email procedures is required. This course is one of four courses required to complete the professional preparation requirements for employed Career and Technical Education instructors. 47 contact hours.

EDE 3321   APPLYING LOVE AND LOGIC IN THE CLASSROOM

credits: 1  

Prerequisite: Admission into the College of Education or permission from the Dean. This course is designed to provide the student with a thorough understanding of the principles and strategies of “Love and Logic.” Love and Logic is a philosophy that is founded on the premise that logical consequences of behavior are the best lessons for teaching responsible behavior. Love and Logic encourages adults to take care of themselves by setting limits in loving ways and offers powerful strategies that encourage children to own and solve their own problems. 17 contact hours.

EDE 4220   INTEGRATED HEALTH AND RECREATION

credits: 1  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Elementary Education with Infused ESOL and Reading BS program. This course is designed to help the student gain knowledge and competencies necessary to become an effective teacher and leader in the areas of elementary school integrated health and recreation. It develops the theoretical bases for health and recreation learning and teaching; illustrates and applies models for integrating elementary teaching; provides practical experience in curriculum, instruction and assessment. This course addresses specific Next Generation Sunshine State Standards, and/or Common Core State Standards, and pedagogy pertinent to the disciplines and requirements for certification. 17 contact hours.

EDE 4223   INTEGRATED MUSIC, ART & MOVEMENT FOR ELEMENTARY CHILDREN

credits: 1  
Prerequisite: EDF 3214. This course is designed to help the student gain knowledge and competencies necessary to become an effective teacher and leader in the areas of elementary school integrated music, art and movement. It develops the theoretical bases for music, art and movement learning and teaching; illustrates and applies models for integrating elementary teaching; provides practical experience in curriculum, instruction and assessment. This course addresses specific Sunshine State Standards, subject matter competencies, and pedagogy pertinent to the disciplines and requirements for certification. 17 contact hours.

EDE 4226   INTEGRATED LANGUAGE ARTS, CHILDREN'S LITERATURE &amp; SOCIAL SCIENCES

credits: 2-4  

Topic #1 Prerequisites: EDF 3214, RED 3309, EDE 4304, EDE 4943 and admission to Elementary Education with Reading BS, Exceptional Education with Reading, Elementary Education BS, or Exceptional Education BS. Additional Prerequisites: EDG 3620 for Elementary Education majors and EEX 3241 for Exceptional Education majors. Co-requisite: EDE 4942 OR Topic #2 Prerequisite: Admission to Canadian EPI, Elementary Education EPI, or Exceptional Education EPI. Corequisite: EDE 4942.

This course is designed to help pre-service teachers teach the social sciences through the language arts, children’s literature, and the creative arts. By using an integrated curricular approach, pre-service teachers acquire competencies in subject area content as well as pedagogical strategies for these disciplines. In addition, the course prepares pre-service teachers to teach using a thematic approach so that K-6 learners understand connections across curricular areas. This course is enriched through the creative arts, including art, music, drama, and dance and addresses the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards, and/or Common Core State Standards in these specific areas. 62 contact hours.

EDE 4226 / TOPIC #2: INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES IN ELEMENTARY LANGUAGE ARTS AND SOCIAL STUDIES EPI

Prerequisite: Elementary Education EPI, Exceptional Education EPI and Canadian EPI students only. Corequisite: EDE 4942. This course is designed to help the student gain knowledge and competencies necessary to become an effective teacher and leader in the areas of elementary school language arts, and social studies. The activities in this course are designed to illustrate and apply models of integrating teaching in those areas. Focus of the course is on program planning, assessment, and evaluation in language arts and social studies. 32 contact hrs.

EDE 4304   INTEGRATED MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE

credits: 3-4  

Undergraduate (4 credit hours) Prerequisite(s): Admission to Elementary Education with Infused ESOL and Reading (K-6) BS, and EDG 3620, and EDF 3214, and Corequisites: EDE 4314 and EDE 4943. Or Admission to Exceptional Student Education with Infused ESOL and Reading (K-12) BS, and EEX 3241, and EDF 3214, and Corequisites: EDE 4314 and EDE 4943. EPI (3 credit hours) Topic # 2 Prerequisite: Admission to Elementary Education EPI or Exceptional Education EPI. Corequisite: EDE 4943. This course is designed to help the student gain knowledge and competencies necessary to become an effective teacher and leader in the areas of elementary school mathematics and science. It develops the theoretical bases for mathematics and science learning and teaching, illustrates and applies models for integrating elementary mathematics and science teaching, provides practical experience in curriculum, instruction and assessment. This course addresses specific Next Generation Sunshine State Standards, and/or Common Core State Standards, subject matter competencies and pedagogy pertinent to the disciplines and required for certification. 45-62 contact hours.

EDE 4314   MATHEMATICAL CONCEPTS AND PROCEDURES IN THE K-6 CLASSROOM

credits: 1  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Elementary Education with Infused ESOL and Reading (K-6) BS or the Exceptional Student Education with Infused ESOL and Reading (K-12) BS program. Corequisites: EDE 4304 and EDE 4943. This course introduces conceptually and developmentally appropriate mathematics content based on the five content areas identified by the state (Next Generation Sunshine State Standards), and/or Common Core State Standards. Within these content areas, students will learn techniques consistent with the national process standards including problem solving, computation, effective representation, communication, reasoning, and making connections as well as error pattern analysis and research-based procedural strategies. This course addresses specific Next Generation Sunshine State Standards, and/or Common Core State Standards, subject matter competencies, and pedagogy pertinent to the discipline and required for teacher certification. 17 contact hours.

EDE 4421   EVALUATION IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

credits: 2  

Prerequisites: Admission to Elementary Education with Infused ESOL and Reading (K-6) BS, AND EDF 3214, AND EDF 4430, OR Admission to Initial Certification. This course is designed to extend the knowledge base acquired in Measurement, Evaluation and Assessment in Education K-12 to focus on the evaluation of measurement in grades K-6. Teachers learn the principles needed to interpret and understand all types of standardized and non-standardized assessment tools. 32 contact hours.

EDE 4940   INTERNSHIP: ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

credits: 12  

Prerequisites: Successful completion of all Elementary Education BS program requirements and passing of all sections of the General Knowledge and Professional Education Exam. This course requires a teacher candidate to demonstrate competency on the Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPs) at the pre-professional level during one semester of full time internship in a K-6 school setting as approved by the College of Education. Teacher candidates must assume full-day teaching duties for a minimum of six weeks during the fifteen week internship. The internship also includes mandatory on-campus seminars. Contact hours: a minimum of 35 hours per week for 15 weeks.

EDE 4942   INTEGRATED LANGUAGE ARTS, CHILDREN'S LITERATURE AND SOCIAL SCIENCE PRACTICUM

credits: 1  

Prerequisites: Admission to Elementary Education with Infused ESOL and Reading (K-6) BS, and EDF 3214, and RED 3309 Corequisite: EDE 4226     OR

Admission to Exceptional Student Education with Infused ESOL and Reading (K-12) BS, and EDF 3214, and RED 3309. Corequisite: EDE 4226

Topic #2:

Admission to Elementary Education EPI, or Admission to Exceptional Education EPI and Corequisite: EDE 4226.

This course is designed to give practical experience to students through school-based experiences in public and approved private school classrooms. Students work directly with elementary classroom teachers and have an opportunity to teach both large and small group activities, particularly children’s literature, language arts and social science. This course is designed to develop competencies relative to program planning instruction, daily schedule, record keeping, evaluation, classroom management, reporting to parents, professional organizations, and teacher ethics. Students spend a minimum of sixty (60) school-based hours in the elementary classroom or a setting pre-approved by faculty member teaching the course. 17 contact hours.

EDE 4943   INTEGRATED MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE PRACTICUM

credits: 1  

Topic #1 Prerequisite: (EDG 3620 or EEX 3241) and EDF 3214 and admission to Elementary Education with Infused ESOL and Reading BS, Exceptional Student Education with Infused ESOL and Reading BS. Corequisites: EDE 4304 and EDE 4314.

OR Topic #2 Prerequisite: Admission to Elementary Education EPI or Exceptional Education EPI. Corequisite: EDE 4304.

This course is designed to give practical experience to students through school-based experiences in public and approved private school classrooms. Students work directly with elementary classroom teachers and have an opportunity to teach both large and small group activities, particularly Math and Science. This course is designed to develop competencies relative to program planning, instruction, daily scheduling, record keeping, evaluation, and classroom management, reporting to parents, professional organizations, and teacher ethics. Students spend a minimum of sixty (60) school-based hours (SBH) in the elementary classroom. 15 contact hours.

EDE 4943 / Topic #2 Integrated Mathematics and Science Elementary (K-6) Field Experience: EPI 1 credit

Prerequisite: Admission to the Elementary Education EPI or Exceptional Student Education EPI. Corequisite: EDE 4304. This course is designed to give practical experience to students through school-based experiences in public and approved private school classrooms. Students work directly with elementary classroom teachers and have an opportunity to teach both large and small group activities, particularly Math and Science. This course is designed to develop competencies relative to program planning, instruction, daily scheduling, record keeping, evaluation, classroom management, reporting to parents, professional organizations, and teacher ethics. 15 contact hours.

EDF 1005   INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION

credits: 3  

This course is an introduction to the development and organization of the American educational system and profession. It examines historical, sociological, ethical and philosophical foundations of education. 47 contact hours, plus 15 hours of field experience under the supervision of a K-12 teacher certified in-field. This requires students to pay to be fingerprinted in order to complete the Level II security clearance. A student who has a criminal background precluding him or her from volunteering in a classroom may not be able to complete the field experience and may not receive credit for this course.

EDF 2085   TEACHING DIVERSE POPULATIONS

credits: 3  

This course is designed to introduce prospective teachers to the issues involved in a multicultural approach for American educational systems. It reviews the significance of multicultural worldviews and examines changing demographic patterns which affect school populations, diverse perspectives which impact teaching and learning in educational systems, and effective instructional strategies for working with diverse student populations. 47 contact hours plus an additional 15 hours participation in a variety of multicultural experiences are required. This requires students to pay to be fingerprinted in order to complete the Level II security clearance. A student who has a criminal background precluding him or her from volunteering in a classroom may not be able to complete the field experience and may not receive credit for this course.

EDF 3214   STUDENT DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING PRINCIPLES K-12

credits: 3  

Prerequisite(s):  Admission to:BSCED-BS, EDST-BS, ELEDR-BS, ESEDR-BS, MGMED-BS, MGSED-BS, MTSED-BS, or ICERT-NO.

This course is designed to cover principles of learning and student development and their applications to learning/teaching situations. Self-concept, motivation, views of intelligence and assessment are examined with opportunities to analyze teaching/learning episodes and to develop a repertoire of teaching approaches. Emphasis is placed on the interaction between the role of the teacher and the needs and learning styles of students at various developmental ages and stages. A minimum of 5 school-based hours of observation/teaching specifically related to principles of learning and development are required. 47 contact hours.

EDF 3660   EDUCATION AND PUBLIC POLICY IN THE UNITED STATES

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Educational Studies BS or Public Policy and Administration BS program. This course is designed to study the relationship between education and public policy at the federal, state, and local levels of government. Emphasis is placed on the social, political, and economic factors that affect the development of educational public policy. 47 contact hours.

EDF 3862   INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES IN EDUCATION

credits: 1-4  
Prerequisite: Admission to the Educational Studies BS Program or permission from the Dean. This course is designed to provide students with a global perspective of important educational issues and themes across cultures. This perspective is gained through travel to an international location that includes structured experiences in the culture. Students will be expected to compare the educational system in the United States with other nations, with a specific focus on cultures, issues, and themes. A final project that reflects on the learning experiences from the study abroad endeavor is required. A minimum of 35 field-based hours of observation/teaching specifically are required. 17-62 contact hours.

EDF 4264   LEARNING THEORY AND INSTRUCTION

credits: 3  

Prerequisite(s): Admission to EPI-CT or ICERT-NO or RCERT-NO. This course is designed to cover principles of learning and student development and their applications to learning/teaching situations. Self-concept, motivation, views of intelligence and assessment are examined with opportunities to analyze teaching/learning episodes and to develop a repertoire of teaching approaches. Emphasis is placed on the interaction between the role of the teacher and the needs and learning styles of students at various developmental ages and stages. Teacher candidates create coherent, meaningful learning experiences using the major philosophical foundations of education to develop learners’ competence in subject matter knowledge. Teacher candidates evaluate the suitability of the content against learner intellectual, social, emotional, and physical characteristics. 47 contact hours.

EDF 4430   MEASUREMENT, EVALUATION AND ASSESSMENT IN EDUCATION K-12

credits: 2  

Prerequisite(s): Admission to BSCED-BS or Admission to MGSED-BS or Admission to DST-BS or Admission to EDST-BS or Admission to ELEDR-BS or Admission to ESEDR-BS or
Admission to MGMED-BS or Admission to MTSED-BS or Admission to ICERT-NO. This course is designed to study advanced principles of measurement, evaluation and assessment. Course content covers knowledge of and competencies for analyzing learner needs, instructional adaptation, differences in learner cognitive, social, linguistic, cultural, emotional and physical needs. 32 contact hours.

EDF 4444   ASSESSMENT IN THE CURRICULUM

credits: 2  

Prerequisite: Admission to Educator Preparation Institute (EPI-CT,) or ICERT-NO, or RCERT-NO.

This course is designed to develop the necessary skills required by teachers to develop a variety of assessments that will help identify gaps in student learning and measure student learning gains. The course will instruct teacher candidates how to design, select, implement, and interpret assessments for P-12 classrooms. Teacher candidates will learn how to analyze P-12 student assessment data and then communicate the results with parents and caregivers. The use of technology to organize and integrate assessment data will also be addressed. 32 contact hours.

EDF 4490   RESEARCH IN EDUCATIONAL STUDIES

credits: 3  
Prerequisites: Admission to Educational Studies BS. This course is designed to provide an introduction to the process of reviewing, evaluating, conducting and disseminating education research. 47 contact hours.

EDF 4632   SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Admission to the Education Studies BS program. This course provides a sociological approach to education, from several theoretical perspectives and their application to current educational issues, to the structure and processes that make education systems work. This course focuses on the role of school in society and how school relates to other systems within the macro system. 47 contact hours.

EDF 4781   EDUCATIONAL ISSUES FOR THE 21st CENTURY

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: Admission to Secondary Science Education BS, Business Technology Education BS, Educational Studies BS, Elementary Education with Reading BS, Elementary Education BS, Exceptional Student Education BS, Exceptional Student Education with Reading BS, Middle Grades Math Education BS, Middle Grades Science Education BS, Secondary Math Education BS or Technology Education BS. This course is a compendium of four concepts to enhance specific professional skills that are necessary for success as an educator: educational law, principles of professional conduct of the education profession in Florida as outlined in The Code of Ethics, character education and teacher resiliency. 32 contact hours.

EDF 4810   COMPARATIVE AND INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Admission to the Educational Studies BS Program. The Right to Education is a fundamental human right according to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (Article 26) of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). Yet, education is denied to many across the world, particularly women. This course will examine and compare educational systems in their national contexts around the world in the United States of America, United Kingdom, France, the Russian Federation, Mexico, Japan, People's Republic of China, India,and Nigeria. emphasis will be placed on a blend of historical, philosophical, political,cultural,and sociological perspectives on a variety of foundational topics in international education, including the vital interests of developing and developed states; the implications for ethnonationalism, political, economic, environmental and educational relationships. 47 contact hours.

EDF 4930   EPI CAPSTONE SEMINAR

credits: 1  

Prerequisite: Admission to Educator Preparation Institute (EPI) program and EDF 4944. Corequisite: EDF 4949. This is a course for EPI students (teacher candidates) in their final semester. Teacher candidates will complete this course in conjunction with the internship course (EDF 4949) and will be required to demonstrate competency in two of the six Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPs) at the pre-professional level. This course will focus on the following areas: professional development, ethical conduct, and subject area knowledge.

EDF 4932   SENIOR CAPSTONE FOR EDUCATIONAL STUDIES

credits: 4  
Prerequisite: EDF 4490 and admission to Educational Studies BS and senior standing. This course is to be taken during the student’s last semester in the College of Education. This multidisciplinary course is the culminating experience with a focus on critical analysis designed to broaden students’ perspectives within the social sciences, including Education. This course helps students seeking careers in non-school settings develop a more thorough understanding of the issues confronting institutions from a national or global perspective. Students will integrate knowledge and skills developed during the Educational Studies program to create an independent study such as a research project, case study, grant application, improvement plan, service learning project, etc. to explore a specific issue or problem. 62 contact hours.

EDF 4944   EPI PRACTICUM

credits: 3  

This course is designed to give practical experience in public school classrooms to teacher candidates. Candidates work directly with classroom teachers in the field where they wish to become certified. Through a coaching model, the candidates will develop competencies relating to instruction, evaluation, classroom management, professional behaviors, and teacher ethics. Students spend a minimum of sixty (60) school-based hours (SBH) in the classroom in the area of certification. 45 contact hours.

EDF 4949   EPI INTERNSHIP

credits: 6  

Prerequisites: Successful completion of all EPI-CT program requirements and Pass all sections of the General Knowledge and Professional Education Exam and Corequisite: EDF 4930. This course requires a teacher candidate to demonstrate competency on four Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPs) at the pre-professional level during eight weeks of full day internship in a Prekindergarten through twelfth grade (P-12) setting. Contact hours: 35 hours per week for 8 weeks. 

EDG 1319   PROFESSIONAL TECHNIQUES FOR CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT

credits: 1  

This course is a series of topics, each of specific interest to early childhood professionals. The topics offerred are Unit Blocks, Musical Activities, and Play As Learning. 16 contact hours per topic per credit. A maximum of 3 credit hours per session. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. 

EDG 3341   EFFECTIVE STRATEGIES FOR UNDERACHIEVING STUDENTS

credits: 2  
Prerequisites: Admission to Secondary Science EPI, Secondary Math EPI, Middle Grades Science EPI, Middle Grades Math EPI or Initial Certification. The purpose of this course is to examine the complexities of teaching in schools that qualify for free or reduced-priced meals, have high rates of teacher turnover and produce low gains in student achievement. The course will address these issues by examining historical materials and contemporary understanding of the impact of these variables on attitude, motivation, and learning. This course will engage students in both learning and teaching in that preservice teachers will acquire knowledge about teaching strategies tailored for this type of school environment and have opportunities to practice them as part of their field experience in these neighborhood schools. Field experiences required. 32 contact hours.

EDG 3410   CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT AND COMMUNICATION K-12

credits: 2  

Topic #1 Prerequisite: (Admission to Middle Grades General Science BS, Secondary Science Education BS, Business Technology Education BS, Educational Studies BS, Elementary Education with Reading BS, Exceptional Education with Reading BS, Elementary Education BS, Exceptional Education BS, Middle Grades Math Education BS, Secondary Math Education BS, or Technology Education BS, and (EDF 3214 or DEP 3305)) or admission to Initial Certification. OR Topic #2 Prerequisite: (Admission to Initial Certification, Canadian EPI, Elementary Education EPI, Exceptional Education EPI, Secondary Math EPI, Middle Grades Math EPI, Middle Grades Science EPI, or Secondary Science EPI.)

This course covers basic skills and knowledge for creating a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction and effective communication among members of the learning community. The course emphasizes attitudes, language patterns, values, and behaviors for eliciting and maintaining student learning as well as on-task behaviors. The course also includes methods and strategies for consulting with other school professionals and parents. 32 contact hours.

EDG 3410 / Topic 2: Managing Behavior for Effective Learning EPI

Prerequisite: Admission to Initial Certification, Canadian EPI, Elementary Education EPI, Exceptional Education EPI, Secondary Math EPI, Middle Grades Math EPI, Middle Grades Science EPI, or Secondary Science EPI. This course addresses the skills and behaviors for establishing a positive learning environment that encourages positive, meaningful communication among member of the learning community. The course focuses on interpersonal and intrapersonal communication as they affect student learning. 32 contact hours.

EDG 3620   CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Admission to Educational Studies BS, Elementary Education BS, Elementary Education with Reading BS, Canadian EPI, or Initial Certification. This course is an introduction to major concepts, assumptions, debates, processes of inquiry, and ways of knowing within the school curriculum. Preservice teachers create coherent, meaningful learning experiences using the major philosophical foundations of education to develop learners’ competence in subject matter knowledge. Preservice teachers evaluate the suitability of the content against learner intellectual, social, emotional, physical characteristics. This course is writing intensive. 47 contact hours.

EDG 4322   PAIDEIA II

credits: 1  
This course is a special session centering around a specific topic designed to enhance specific professional skills. PAIDEIA is the ancient Greek word for education. It is the process of acquiring knowledge. It is also the result of that process, that is, learning and culture. A common cultural tradition is created and renewed by generations of persons who have learned. SPC’s College of Education recognizes that life in community depends on centuries of shared wisdom. Professional seminars include readings, discussion, and presentations in “mental toughness” with the aim of helping future teachers manage themselves, their circumstances and students in effective ways. 17 contact hours.

EDG 4343   COGNITIVE STRATEGIES INSTRUCTION IN THE CLASSROOM

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: (DEP 3305 or EDF 3214 and admission to the Middle Grades Math Education BS or Middle Grades Science Education BS and Corequisite: EDG 4943.) OR (Admission to Middle Grades Math EPI or Middle Grades Science EPI and Corequisite: EDG 4943.) This course is designed for middle grades pre-service teachers to develop reflective practice in the areas of communication, planning, instruction, and assessment. In this course, pre-service teachers will learn how to help middle grade learners (grades 5-9) acquire essential meta-cognitive strategies and responsible behaviors to prepare them for high school. 47 contact hours.

EDG 4419   BUILDING CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT AND DISCIPLINE

credits: 3  

This course focuses on principles and strategies for developing and maintaining an effective classroom environment for diverse learners. Strategies for whole class management as well as management of challenging behaviors will be explored. This course includes Positive Behavior Supports, Response to Intervention and Functional Behavior Analysis as fundamental components of effective classroom management. Participants will design a classroom management plan as well as conduct a functional behavior analysis.  Contact hours: 47 blended.

EDG 4943   COGNITIVE STRATEGIES INSTRUCTION IN THE CLASSROOM PRACTICUM

credits: 1  

Prerequisite: (DEP 3305 or EDF 3214 and admission to the Middle Grades Math Education BS or Middle Grades Science Education BS and Corequisite: EDG 4343) OR (Admission to Middle Grades Math EPI or Middle Grades Science EPI and Corequisite: EDG 4343). This course is designed to give practical experience to students through school-based experiences in public and approved private school classrooms. Students work directly with middle and high school teachers in grades 5-9 and have an opportunity to teach both large and small group activities, particularly in the content areas of math and/or science. This course is designed to develop competencies relative to program planning, instruction, daily scheduling, record keeping, evaluation, communication, classroom management, reporting to parents, professional organizations, and teacher ethics. Students spend a minimum of sixty (60) school-based hours (SBH) in a middle or high school classroom. 17 contact hours.

EDP 2002   EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: PSY 1012 or PSY 1020H. This course focuses on the psychological bases of educational theory and practice, and includes studies of the developmental characteristics of children, principles of learning as applied to the classroom and the nature and significance of individual differences. This course has a substantial writing requirement. 47 contact hours.

EEC 1002   INFANT/TODDLER EDUCATION

credits: 3  

Corequisite: EEC 1603 with a minimum grade of C.  This course is the study of the developmental needs of infants and toddlers ages birth to three. Emphasis is on developing appropriate environments, curriculum activities and policies that support young children and their families. Five (5) hours of field experience in an infant/toddler professional care setting required. 47 contact hours.

EEC 1223   OBSERVATION AND ASSESSMENT IN EARLY CHILDHOOD

credits: 3  

Corequisite: EEC 1603 with a minimum grade of C. This course is a study of the theory and practice of observation and assessment of young children. Emphasis is on the use of various types of informal measurements along with the appropriate use of standardized assessments. Issues of professionalism including confidentiality, absence of bias, and ethical behaviors are addressed. This course requires 15 field experience hours in early childhood care and education settings. 

EEC 1308   EARLY CHILDHOOD PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT

credits: 3  

Prerequisite or corequisite: EEC 1603. This course is designed to give students practice in lesson planning, scheduling, and evaluating the activities of young children in early childhood care and education settings. This course requires 15 field experience hours in early childhood care and education settings. 47 contact hours.

EEC 1600   GUIDING THE YOUNG CHILD

credits: 3  

Corequisite: EEC 1603 with a minimum grade of C. This course is designed for parents and professionals who care for and work with young children. It examines the range of appropriate and acceptable behaviors, consistent limits, communication patterns and styles, and simple rules that clearly define behavioral approaches employed to guide young children in a variety of settings. This course requires 15 field experience hours in early childhood care and education settings. 

EEC 1602   BEHAVIORAL OBSERVATION AND SCREENING IN CHILD CARE

credits: 1  
This course teaches observation and screening principles and skills to providers in the early childhood care and education field. Course content will assist the student in appropriately determining developmental levels, the need for formal developmental assessments or the need to make referrals for early intervention programs and specialized services. 17 contact hours.

EEC 1603   EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: ENC 0015 with a minimum grade of C and REA 0007 with a minimum grade of C. This course is the study of the physical, cognitive, and social-emotional developmental processes of children from conception to age eight. Emphasis is twofold: on understanding the sequential dynamics of growth, development, behavior and understanding the uniqueness of each child. 47 contact hours.

EEC 2002   FOUNDATIONS OF CHILD CARE AND EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION

credits: 3  

This course is designed to meet Florida educational requirements for the Initial Child Care and Education Director Credential, Level I and Level II. The course content emphasizes the development of skills and a knowledge base for problem solving, planning, implementing and evaluating a quality child care and education program for child care administrators. 

EEC 2271   INTRODUCTION TO WORKING WITH YOUNG CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

credits: 3  

Corequisite: EEC 1603 with a minimum grade of C. This course introduces the student to the study of young children, birth through five years of age, with special needs. The content includes an overview of historical and legal perspectives; assessment and evaluation of young children; strategies for collaboration between families and professionals and developmentally appropriate environments, curriculum and interventions. The course requires 5 hours of field experience in an early childhood setting and the completion of field experience assignments. 47 contact hours.

EEC 2272   PRACTICES FOR WORKING WITH YOUNG CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS IN INCLUSIVE SETTINGS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: EEC 2271. This course introduces the concept of inclusion of young children with special needs in early care and education settings. The course will present a model for effective inclusion; raise awareness of adult personal attitudes toward inclusive care and present theories of play development. Course content also includes the organization of the environment, provision of emergent literacy opportunities, management of challenging behaviors and the development of partnerships among parents, professionals and community agencies. This course requires 15 field experience hours in early childhood and education settings serving young children with special needs. 47 contact hours.

EEC 2300   DEVELOPING COGNITIVE ACTIVITIES FOR YOUNG CHILDREN (MATH, LANGUAGE ARTS, SCIENCE, SOCIAL STUDIES, HEALTH)

credits: 3  

Corequisite: EEC 1603 with a minimum grade of C. This course focuses on developing appropriate cognitive teaching and learning strategies for children from infancy to age eight. The student will examine methodological principles from the following curricula areas: mathematics, language arts, science, social studies, and health. This course requires 15 field experience hours in early childhood care and education settings. 47 contact hours.

EEC 2312   DEVELOPING CREATIVE ACTIVITIES FOR YOUNG CHILDREN

credits: 3  

Corequisite: EEC 1603 with a minimum grade of C. This course focuses on developing appropriate creative teaching/learning strategies for children from infancy to age eight. The student will examine creative teaching/learning strategies from the following curricula areas: art, music/movement, language arts and socio-dramatic play. This course requires 15 field experience hours in early childhood care and education settings. 47 contact hours.

EEC 2500   CHILD DEVELOPMENT OVERVIEW

credits: 1  
The focus of this course is to give the student a basic knowledge of the developmental stages, behavior management, age appropriate activities and communications with families as related to childcare. 17 contact hours.

EEC 2521   CHILD CARE REGULATIONS

credits: 1  

The focus of this course is Florida child care laws, Florida Department of Children and Families standards, and local licensing requirements, which build the framework for providing a safe and healthy environment for children in child care. 17 contact hours.

EEC 2523   LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT OF CHILD CARE PROGRAMS

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: Program Administrator Approval. This course is designed to meet the Florida requirements for one of four required courses child care administrators may take to earn an Advanced Level Child Care and Education Director Credential. It also meets the requirement to renew the Director Credential. Course design emphasizes the development of administrators’ skills and knowledge related to organizational leadership and management. Course content includes staff development, evaluation, and retention; personnel policies and relationships; leadership, ethics, professionalism; and organizational structure and dynamics. 47 contact hours.

EEC 2907   EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION INTERNSHIP

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: This course must be taken during the student's last term in the program after completion of EEC 1603, EEC 1223, EEC 2300, EEC 2312EEC 1308, EEC 1600, EEC 2271 and program administrator approval. This course is a practicum experience in an early childhood care and education setting. Emphasis is on student interaction with young children under the supervision of the classroom teacher or center director. Class meets two hours per week in the classroom and a minimum of 60 hours in the child care setting is required. 90 contact hours.

EEC 2943   INSERVICE TRAINING: PREPARATION FOR NATIONAL CDA

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: EEC 1603. A course designed for teachers in the early childhood profession which aids in achieving the required competencies for the National Child Development Associate Certificate. Approximately 2 hours per week on campus classwork and 70 hours "on-the-job" work required.

EEC 3005   CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: BIRTH TO AGE 8

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Educational Studies BS, or Prekindergarten/Primary Education (age 3 through grade 3) with Infused ESOL and Reading BS. This course is the study of child growth and development from conception to age eight. The focus is on cognitive, social, physical, and emotional development of the young child. Course content will include theories of child development, the means through which young children learn, and the role of adults in children's development. 47 contact hours.

EEC 3009   FOUNDATIONS OF EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE AND EDUCATION: BIRTH TO AGE 8

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to Educational Studies BS, or Prekindergarten/Primary Education (age 3 through grade 3) with Infused ESOL and Reading BS. In this course students will explore the historical, social, political, economic and philosophical foundations of early education, early intervention models and approaches, the role of early childhood education in children's lives, relevant learning theories and their application to early education and public policy, governance and advocacy issues. The course provides a context for a dialogic process that encourages reflective inquiry and collaborative thinking. 47 contact hours.

EEC 3204   CURRICULUM IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION: BIRTH TO AGE 8

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to Educational Studies BS, or Prekindergarten/Primary Education (age 3 through grade 3) with Infused ESOL and Reading BS. This course is a study of the components of developmentally appropriate curriculum. Students will evaluate learning environments, analyze classroom schedules and write age appropriate lesson plans for young children, birth to age eight. This course requires 10 field experience hours in an early childhood setting. 47 contact hours.

EEC 3403   YOUNG CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS: BIRTH TO AGE 8

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to Educational Studies BS, or Prekindergarten/Primary Education (age 3 through grade 3) with Infused ESOL and Reading BS. This course introduces the student to the study of young children, birth through eight years of age, with special needs. The content includes an overview of historical and legal perspectives; the family-based model of service delivery; the importance of early identification and strategies for teaching young children with special needs including the preparation of the learning environment and curriculum design. This course requires 5 field experience hours in an early childhood setting. 47 contact hours.

EEC 3413   WORKING WITH DIVERSE FAMILIES IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION: BIRTH TO AGE 8

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to Educational Studies BS, or Prekindergarten/Primary Education (age 3 through grade 3) with Infused ESOL and Reading BS. This course is designed to provide students with a general knowledge of how to serve families they will meet, not only in their early childhood setting, but in the community at large. It will explore issues of human rights, multiculturalism, and also variations in family lifestyles. This course will provide both an historical and current context for cultural understanding in an atmosphere of open dialogue and reflective inquiry. This course requires 5 field experience hours in an early childhood setting. 47 contact hours.

EEC 3731   HEALTH, SAFETY AND NUTRITION FOR THE YOUNG CHILD: BIRTH TO AGE 8

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to Educational Studies BS, or Prekindergarten/Primary Education (age 3 through grade 3) with Infused ESOL and Reading BS. This course will prepare students to manage the diverse issues related to health, safety and nutrition, specifically as applied to children from birth to age eight. The course examines existing early childhood health, safety, disease control and nutritional policies; explores development of health and nutrition standards for children ages birth to eight based on current public policy; investigates healthy and safe school environment practices for children ages birth to eight; researches materials and methods for teaching health, safety and nutrition in primary elementary education. 47 contact hours.

EEC 4207   ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION OF YOUNG CHILDREN: BIRTH TO AGE 8

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to Educational Studies BS, or Prekindergarten/Primary Education (age 3 through grade 3) with Infused ESOL and Reading BS. This course is designed to increase the student’s effective use of assessment and evaluation procedures in early childhood and primary education settings. The student will review appropriate observation and documentation procedures. Students will also compare, analyze and interpret assessments and results to plan curriculum that is responsive to and supports the development and learning of young children, birth to age 8. This course requires 10 field experience hours in an early childhood setting. 47 contact hours.

EEC 4210   INTEGRATED CURRICULUM I FOR PRE-KINDERGARTEN/PRIMARY EDUCATION

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: EEC 3204 and admission to Educational Studies BS, or Prekindergarten/Primary Education (age 3 through grade 3) with Infused ESOL and Reading BS. Corequisite: EEC 4940. This course is designed to increase understanding of creative experiences for children three to eight years of age (prekindergarten to grade three). Emphasis is placed on creating and adapting meaningful, challenging and engaging developmentally supportive learning experiences in art, music, movement and physical skills, and drama. The course promotes methods to incorporate creativity into all aspects of the curriculum. 47 contact hours.

EEC 4211   INTEGRATED CURRICULUM II FOR PRE-KINDERGARTEN/PRIMARY EDUCATION

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: EEC 3204 and admission to Educational Studies BS, or Prekindergarten/Primary Education (age 3 through grade 3) with Infused ESOL and Reading BS. Corequisite: EEC 4941 This course will focus on exploring sequential math development, identifying how concepts are developed and acquired, and promoting young children’s concept development through problem solving, and assessing the child’s developmental level. It will also focus on teaching science strategies using concept development, process of inquiry, planning for fundamental concepts in science including activities for young children at the appropriate stages of cognitive development, while utilizing appropriate technology to support teaching and learning. 47 contact hours.

EEC 4212   MATH, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY FOR PRESCHOOL EDUCATION: BIRTH TO AGE 4

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: EEC 3204 and admission to Educational Studies BS. Corequisite: EEC 4942. This course presents the process of introducing science, technology, and math for young children to age 4. It includes planning and implementation of appropriate activities and development of methods and techniques of delivery, fostering an exploration of methods and materials for teaching young children math and science concepts and process skills through discovery and play. 47 contact hours.

EEC 4227   CREATIVE ARTS FOR PRESCHOOL EDUCATION

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: EEC 3204 and admission to Educational Studies BS. Corequisite: EEC 4944. This course is designed to increase understanding of the development of creativity and the importance of creative experiences from birth through four years of age. Emphasis is placed on creating and adapting meaningful, challenging, engaging and developmentally supportive learning experiences in art, music, movement, and dramatics. The course incorporates methods to promote creativity into all aspects of the curriculum. 47 contact hours.

EEC 4274   EARLY CHILDHOOD ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION FOR CHILDREN WITH EXCEPTIONAL NEEDS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Prekindergarten/Primary Education (age 3 through grade 3) with Infused ESOL and Reading BS. This course is designed to provide students with a critical understanding of developmentally appropriate assessment and intervention processes and procedures for young children with special needs age three to grade three. Students will develop the knowledge, skills, and strategies needed to interpret multi-disciplinary evaluation information and to develop and administer formal and informal performance-based assessments for the purpose of designing and implementing interventions that will guide instruction. This course requires 47 contact hours.

EEC 4314   SOCIAL/EMOTIONAL COMPETENCE, CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT, AND GUIDANCE OF YOUNG CHILDREN

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to Prekindergarten/Primary Education (age 3 through grade 3) with Infused ESOL and Reading BS. This course is designed to present foundations of knowledge about social and emotional development. The content will enable students to acquire the background knowledge and skills necessary to analyze developmental theories as they apply to young children's social and emotional development. Additionally, this course will examine appropriate and developmentally sensitive strategies for managing behavior in typically and atypically developing children birth to eight years of age. Performing functional analysis of behavior and collaboration with support specialties will be discussed. The importance of consistency and proactive strategies will be stressed. In addition to class meetings, a minimum of 10 hours of observation and participation in an early childhood setting are required. The course requires 47 contact hours.

EEC 4408   FAMILY, TEACHER, COMMUNITY RELATIONS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION: BIRTH TO AGE 8

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to Educational Studies BS, or Prekindergarten/Primary Education (age 3 through grade 3) with Infused ESOL and Reading BS. This course is designed to prepare the student to acquire an understanding of diversity within families and the development of positive relationships between teachers and families. Implications from this knowledge will guide the development of systems and programs that promote sustained collaboration between families and schools for children, birth to age 8. This course requires 5 field experience hours in an early childhood setting. 47 contact hours.

EEC 4706   EARLY AND EMERGENT LITERACY IN PRESCHOOL EDUCATION

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Admission to Educational Studies BS. This course is designed to increase understanding of the emergence of human language and the fundamentals of early literacy development in children from birth to four years of age. Communication ranging from prenatal interactions through the preschool years will be explored along with the understanding that communication is a whole process in which speaking, listening, using written symbols and reading symbols are closely connected. Language, communication, literacy theory and current research are used to encourage the development of informed practices that are developmentally appropriate for the age of the child. This course requires 15 field experience hours in an early childhood setting. 47 contact hours.

EEC 4940   PRE-KINDERGARTEN/PRIMARY EDUCATION PRACTICUM I

credits: 1  

Prerequisites: Admission to Educational Studies - Preschool Education (Birth To Age 4) Subplan BS, and EEC 3204, or admission to Prekindergarten/Primary Education (age 3 through grade 3) with Infused ESOL and Reading, and EEC 3204. Corequisite: EEC 4210. This course is designed to provide field experiences and support related to the early childhood education courses in which the student is concurrently enrolled. The practicum focuses on language arts and emergent literacy, providing activities to stimulate language acquisition and reading readiness through dramatic play and a print- rich environment. Content builds upon generic competencies studied in education and emphasizes the Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPS) at the pre-professional level. This course will enable the student to demonstrate knowledge of developmentally appropriate curriculum and environment for young children. Field work required will provide first-hand experience implementing course work in a public school setting. This experience will be monitored by a representative from the College of Education. The practicum also includes a series of mandatory professional leadership seminars. Contact hours: 15, with a minimum of 4 hours per week of field based experience, for a total of 60 field based hours per semester.

EEC 4941   PRE-KINDERGARTEN/PRIMARY EDUCATION PRACTICUM II

credits: 1  

Prerequisite: Admission to Educational Studies - Preschool Education (Birth To Age 4) Subplan BS, and EEC 3204, or Admission to Prekindergarten/Primary Education (age 3 through grade 3) with Infused ESOL and Reading, EEC 3204. Corequisite: EEC 4211. This course will focus on: exploring number concepts, how concepts are developed and acquired, and promoting young children’s concept development through problem solving, and assessing the child’s developmental level. Science teaching strategies will use concept development, inquiry and curiosity, with an emphasis on exploration and discovery in sensory hands-on experiences, providing first-hand activities for young children at the appropriate stages of cognitive development. Appropriate technology will be utilized to support teaching and learning. Content builds upon generic competencies studied in education and emphasizes the Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPS) at the pre-professional level. This course will enable the student to demonstrate knowledge of developmentally appropriate curriculum and environment for young children. Field work required will provide first-hand experience implementing course work in a public school setting. This experience will be monitored by a representative from the College of Education. The practicum also includes a series of mandatory professional leadership seminars. Contact hours: a minimum of 4 hours per week for a total of 60 hours per semester.

EEC 4942   PRESCHOOL EDUCATION PRACTICUM II EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION PRESCHOOL (BIRTH TO AGE 4)

credits: 1  

Prerequisite: EEC 3204 and Admission to the Educational Studies BS Program. Corequisite: EEC 4212. This course is designed to provide field experiences and support related to the early childhood education courses in which the student is concurrently enrolled. The practicum will focus on: exploring number concepts, how concepts are developed and acquired, promoting young children’s concept development through problem solving, and assessing the child’s developmental level. Science teaching strategies will use concept development, inquiry and curiosity, with an emphasis on exploration and discovery in sensory hands-on experiences, providing first-hand activities for young children at the appropriate stages of cognitive development. Appropriate technology will be utilized to support teaching and learning. This course will enable the student to demonstrate knowledge of developmentally appropriate curriculum and environments for young children. Field work required will provide first-hand experience implementing course work in a licensed childhood center. This experience will be monitored by a representative from the College of Education. The practicum also includes a series of mandatory professional leadership seminars. Contact hours: a minimum of 4 hours per week for a total of 60 hours per semester. This course requires 60 hours of field-based experience

EEC 4944   PRESCHOOL EDUCATION PRACTICUM I: BIRTH TO AGE 4

credits: 1  

Prerequisite: EEC 3204 and Admission to the Educational Studies Program. Corequisite: EEC 4227. This course is designed to provide field experiences and support related to the early childhood education courses in which the student is concurrently enrolled. The practicum focuses on language arts and emergent literacy, providing activities to stimulate language acquisition and reading readiness through dramatic play and a print-rich environment. This course will enable the student to demonstrate knowledge of developmentally appropriate curriculum and environments for young children. Field work required will provide first-hand experience implementing course work in a licensed early childhood setting. The practicum also includes a series of mandatory professional leadership seminars. This course requires 60 hours of field-based experience. Contact hours: 15

EEC 4945   SENIOR CAPSTONE FOR PRESCHOOL EDUCATION (BIRTH TO AGE 4)

credits: 4  

Prerequisite(s): Admission to Educational Studies and Subplan B: Preschool Education (Birth to Age 4) BS program and successful completion of all program requirements. This course requires students in the Preschool Education (Birth To Age 4) BS program to demonstrate competency on the five standards for Early Childhood Professional Preparation from National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC). This capstone may be performed at a licensed early childhood center, which may be the student’s employment site. This program provides a non-certification degree, focusing on professional training for employment not requiring teacher certification. The capstone also includes a series of mandatory professional leadership seminars. 

EEC 4946   INTERNSHIP: EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION PREKINDERGARTEN/PRIMARY

credits: 4-12  

Prerequisites: (Admission to the Educational Studies BS program Prekindergarten/Primary Education Studies Track OR Admission to Prekindergarten/Primary Education (age 3 through grade 3) with Infused ESOL and Reading BS) and successful completion of all program requirements. This course requires students to demonstrate competency on the twelve Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPs) and the five Standards for Early Childhood Professional Preparation from National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) at the pre-professional level. Students are required to complete an internship based on their program of study as described below:


Topic 1: Contact hours: a minimum of 12 hours per week for thirteen weeks in a licensed childhood center or a public school setting.

Topic 2: Contact hours: a minimum of 35 hours per week for fifteen weeks in a public school setting.

Course Topics:
1
EDST-BS students take this topic for 4 credits

2
PKPED-BS students take this topic for 12 credits

EET 1015C   DC CIRCUIT ANALYSIS WITH LAB

credits: 4  
Prerequisite: MAT 1033, or appropriate score on the SPC Placement test, or permission of the program director. This course will cover the direct current (DC) characteristics of electric and magnetic circuits, using Ohm’s and Kirchhoff’s laws, with the use of related theorems, including Thevenin, Norton, superposition, nodal and mesh equations, for solving DC circuits. The laboratory exercises cover the measurement and analysis of direct current (DC) circuits, including the verification of the related network theorems. 62 contact hours.

EET 1025C   AC CIRCUIT ANALYSIS WITH LAB

credits: 4  
Prerequisite: EET 1015C or permission of the Program Director. This course will cover the alternating current (AC) characteristics of electric circuits, using single or multiple sinusoidal voltage and current sources. The course content includes resistance, inductance, and capacitance components used in combination circuit configurations for analyzing current and voltage behavior. Topics include two port networks, three phase power systems, series and parallel resonance, complex harmonic waveforms, high frequency modeling, and power transformers. The laboratory exercises cover the measurement and analysis of alternating current (AC) circuits. 62 contact hours.

EET 1084C   INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRONICS

credits: 3  

This course provides an introduction to the basic fundamentals, terminology, and applications used in the electronics industry. The topic coverage will include circuit theory principles, electronic components, transistor usage, amplifiers, power supplies, digital logic techniques, and electronic instruments. This course will also include some basic laboratory exercises to strengthen the topic coverage as it pertains to basic measurement involving both analog and digital circuits. 47 contact hours.

EET 1205C   ELECTRONIC INSTRUMENTATION

credits: 1  
This course introduces the student to the basic equipment. The topics covered will include the principle of operation and usage of digital multimeters, function generators, pulse generators, frequency counters, oscilloscopes, and logic analyzers. 32 contact hours.

EET 2140C   SOLID STATE ELECTRONICS WITH LAB

credits: 4  

Prerequisite: EET 1015C or permission of the Program Director. This course is a study of the characteristics in which active semiconductor devices are operated in their linear ranges. The areas of coverage include semiconductor diodes, bipolar junction transistors, field effect transistors, load lines and biasing, small signal analysis, hybrid parameters, amplifiers, complementary symmetry, Darlington Pair, decibels, Bode plots, and feedback. The laboratory exercises cover the measurement and analysis of solid state circuits and devices. 62 contact hours.

EET 2155C   LINEAR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS WITH LAB

credits: 4  
This course covers the fundamentals and applications of linear integrated circuits and operational amplifiers. The course coverage includes inverting and non-inverting amplifiers, comparators, signal generators, differential and instrumentation amplifiers, operational amplifier specifications, active filters, modulator-demodulator integrated circuits, timers, analog to digital converters (ADC), and digital to analog converters (DAC). The laboratory exercises cover the measurement and analysis of linear circuits and devices. 62 contact hours.

EET 2949   CO-OP WORK EXPERIENCE

credits: 1-3  
Prerequisite: Faculty Advisor/Co-op Coordinator or Program Director approval. This course is designed to provide students with major-related, supervised, evaluated practical training work experiences which may be paid or voluntary. Students are graded on the basis of documented learning acquired through hands-on experiences in an actual work setting. Variable credits are available, one to three per course. The student must fulfill the requirement of 60 on-the-job hours for each credit earned in addition to written assignments. Co-op courses may be repeated but total credits shall not exceed twelve.

EEX 2010   INTRODUCTION TO EXCEPTIONAL EDUCATION

credits: 3  
This course provides a survey of the challenges inherent to educating children and adults with special needs. It is also intended to help prospective teachers understand and be sensitive to the circumstances faced by exceptional learners and their families. Etiology, characteristics, identification, and adaptive teaching methods will be presented for individuals with: learning disabilities, brain injuries, communication disorders, behavioral/emotional disorders, hearing loss, mental impairment, visual impairments, and multiple/severe disabilities. The special needs of gifted and talented students will also be covered. Three credit hours weekly plus 15 hours of participation/observation in special education settings are required.

EEX 3012   NATURE AND NEEDS OF EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS K-12

credits: 2-3  

Prerequisite(s): Admission to Elementary Education with Infused ESOL and Reading (K-6) BS, OR Exceptional Student Education with Infused ESOL and Reading (K-12) BS, OR Middle Grades General Science Education (5-9), OR Science Teacher Education Biology Teacher Education (6-12) BS, OR Middle Grades Mathematics Education (5-9) BS, OR Secondary Mathematics Education (6-12) BS, OR Educational Studies BS. This survey course uses common characteristics of students with exceptionalities to assist the teacher candidate to implement differentiated teaching strategies, accommodations, and modifications in the classroom. Course topics are placed in the historic and legal contexts of disability advocacy, including the current Response to Intervention initiative. This course includes a minimum of 10 school-based hours of experiences with students who have disabilities. 47 contact hours.

EEX 3012 / Topic #2: TEACHING IN THE INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM: IMPACT

This course is designed to prepare teacher candidates for an inclusive classroom which serves a variety of students, including those with disabilities. Candidates will review topics including terminology, assessment, classification, prevalence, history, behaviors, characteristics, and educational approaches of exceptional students. 32 contact hours.

EEX 3101   SURVEY OF NORMAL/ABNORMAL LANGUAGE AND SPEECH DEVELOPMENT

credits: 1  
Prerequisites: (EEX 3012 and admission to Exceptional Student Education with Reading BS, Exceptional Student Education BS) or admission to Exceptional Student Education EPI. This course is a survey of normal language and speech development, an overview of major communication disorders and supportive strategies for classroom teachers. 17 contact hours.

EEX 3241   ORGANIZATION, CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION FOR EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS

credits: 2  

Prerequisite: Admission to Exceptional Student Education with Infused ESOL and Reading (K-12) BS, OR Educational Studies BS. This course is an assessment of organization, curriculum materials, effective strategies, and technologies available to teach exceptional students. 32 contact hours.

EEX 3280   CAREER/VOCATIONAL ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUCTIONAL PLANNING

credits: 1  

Prerequisite: EEX 3012 and Admission to Exceptional Student Education with Reading BS, Exceptional Student Education BS, or Exceptional Student Education EPI. This course will give prospective teachers an understanding of how exceptional students move successfully from the school and work environment to the community environment which best meets their needs. 17 contact hours.

EEX 4034   EXCEPTIONAL LEARNERS IN THE SECONDARY INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Permission of the Dean. This course is an overview of secondary exceptional education students. The course covers the characteristics of disabilities covered under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), the laws that govern the instruction of exceptional students and the special education service models used in the secondary setting. 47 contact hours.

EEX 4084   DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION OF EXCEPTIONAL & DIVERSE STUDENTS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to EPI-CT or RCERT-NO. This course is designed to introduce teacher candidates to the categories and characteristics of exceptional students served in the public school setting and how these classifications impact curriculum and instruction. Teacher candidates will review the concepts of differentiated instruction and inclusionary classroom practices for exceptional and diverse students.

EEX 4094   NATURE AND DIAGNOSTIC ASSESSMENT OF AUTISM

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Students must be in the AUTISM-NO program. This course is an introduction to the nature of autism which surveys the history of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and gives an overview of the characteristics of children on the autism spectrum. Students will study the assessment and diagnosis of autism and examine research-based best practices for children on the autism spectrum. 47 contact hours.

EEX 4221   EDUCATIONAL ASSESSMENT OF EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: EDF 4430, and EEX 3012, and admission to ELEDR-BS or ESEDR-BS, or ICERT-NO. This course is a study of theory and practice of informal and formal assessment of behavior and/or learning problems. Practice with evaluation instruments and strategies is a key component of the course. Use of assessment information in designing academic K-12 curriculum plans is taught. 47 contact hours.

EEX 4242   DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT FOR SECONDARY EXCEPTIONAL LEARNERS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Permission of the Dean. This course is designed to offer secondary content teachers understanding and strategies of how to teach and assess students with disabilities in a secondary inclusion setting. Teachers will learn the concept of differentiated instruction, inclusionary classroom practices, content-specific instructional strategies, and how to effectively assess students with disabilities in a secondary setting. 47 online contact hours.

EEX 4261   CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES FOR STUDENTS WITH BEHAVIORAL DISORDERS AND SPECIFIC LEARNING DISABILITIES

credits: 1 - 4  

Prerequisites: EEX 3012, and EEX 3241, and EEX 4221, and EEX 4604 and admission to Exceptional Student Education with Reading BS or Exceptional Student Education BS. This course addresses curriculum, materials, effective strategies and technologies available to teach students with mild or moderate disabilities. Learning theory and strategies are analyzed and applied. This course emphasizes basic knowledge and skills for establishing and maintaining order in the classroom, problem-solving, and developing social skills. It includes a minimum of fifteen (15) school-based hours of observation/teaching in an exceptional educational setting(s). 62 contact hours.

EEX 4261 / TOPIC 2: DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION: EPI  1 credit

Prerequisite: EEX 3012 and admission to the Exceptional Student Education EPI Program. This course addresses curriculum, materials, effective strategies and technologies available to teach students with behavioral disorders and specific learning disabilities. Learning theory and strategies are analyzed and applied. 17 contact hours.

EEX 4291   EFFECTIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS FOR AUTISM THROUGH DESIGN, ASSESSMENT, BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT AND PBS

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Admission to the AUTISM-NO program. This course offers instruction regarding behavior management of and classroom management supports for children with autism. Class members will examine various behavior analysis techniques, positive behavior and classroom supports for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Class members will evaluate behavior assessments and construct instructional planning for children with autism. 47 contact hours.

EEX 4604   BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT OF EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: EEX 3012. Admission to Elementary Education with Reading BS, or Exceptional Student Education with Reading BS, or Elementary Education BS, or Exceptional Student Education BS, or Middle Grades General Science Education BS, or Middle Grades Mathematics Education BS or Elementary Education EPI or Exceptional Student Education EPI Program. This course is designed to prepare teachers for the educational management of exceptional students with emphasis on behavior management and consultation skills. Students will gain a basic knowledge of how to create and maintain an on-task, safe and healthy environment for learning in the exceptional education classroom as well as the inclusive classroom. 47 contact hours.

EEX 4606   BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT OF SECONDARY EXCEPTIONAL LEARNERS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Permission of the Dean. This course is designed to prepare inservice teachers for managing the behavior of secondary exceptional education earners (6-12) with an emphasis on positive behavioral supports and collaboration skills. Teachers will learn how to create and maintain a positive and supportive environment for learning in a secondary inclusive classroom. 47 contact hours.

EEX 4761   COMMUNICATION, ASSESSMENT, STRATEGIES, AND ASSISTIVE AND INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY FOR STUDENTS WITH AUTISM

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Students must be in the AUTISM-NO program. The course will examine the potential usefulness of Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC) supports to increase, maintain or improve functional communication skills of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in community and school settings. Students will develop the awareness and the necessary skills to conduct informed observations of communication abilities and to identify AAC supports that match the individual's learning style. Students will learn strategies to collaborate with teachers, family members and related professionals to increase communication amongst stakeholders. 47 contact hours.

EEX 4764   TECHNOLOGY AND TRANSITION FOR SECONDARY EXCEPTIONAL LEARNERS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to Business Technology Education BS, Educational Studies BS, Elementary Education with Reading BS, Exceptional Education with Reading BS, Elementary Education BS, Exceptional Education BS, Middle Grades Math Education BS, Middle Grades Science Education BS, Secondary Math Education BS, Secondary Science Education BS, Technology Education BS, Elementary Education EPI, Exceptional Education EPI, Secondary Math EPI, Middle Grades Math EPI, Middle Grades Science EPI, or Secondary Science EPI, or Initial Teaching Certification, or Recertification. This course is designed to prepare inservice teachers to incorporate assistive and instructional technology in inclusive secondary classrooms. The emphasis is on using available technologies to support the behavior and academic learning of exceptional learners. The transition process and its connection to academic success are also covered. 47 online contact hours.

EEX 4940   INTERNSHIP: EXCEPTIONAL STUDENT EDUCATION

credits: 12  

Prerequisites: Successful completion of all Exceptional Student Education BS program requirements and passing of all sections of the General Knowledge and Professional Education Exam. This course requires a teacher candidate to demonstrate competency on the Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPs) at the pre-professional level during one semester of full time internship in a K-6 school setting as approved by the College of Education. Teacher candidates must assume full-day teaching duties for a minimum of six weeks during the fifteen week internship. The internship also includes mandatory on-campus seminars. Contact hours: a minimum of 35 hours per week for 15 weeks.

EEX 4941   NATURE AND DIAGNOSTIC ASSESSMENT OF AUTISM FIELD EXPERIENCE

credits: 1  

Prerequisite: Students must be in the AUTISM-NO program. Corequisite: EEX 4094. This course is a companion course to the Nature of Autism course. Students will spend time in a classroom with children who have Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) in order to apply the knowledge gained in the paired theory course. Assignments and peer discussion relating to the observed application of material covered in the companion course will be submitted. 30 clock hours spent with child or children diagnosed with ASD in a school setting. 15 contact hours.

EEX 4942   EFFECTIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS FOR AUTISM THROUGH DESIGN, ASSESSMENT, BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT AND PBS FIELD EXPERIENCE

credits: 1  

Prerequisite: Students must be in the AUTISM-NO program. Corequisite: EEX 4291. This course is a companion course to the Effective Learning Environments for Students with Autism course. Students will spend time in a classroom with children who have Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) in order to apply the knowledge gained in the paired theory course. Assignments and peer discussion relating to the observed application of material covered in the companion course will be submitted. 30 clock hours spent with child or children diagnosed with ASD in a school setting. 15 contact hours.

EEX 4943   COMMUNICATION ASSESSMENT, STRATEGIES, AND ASSISTIVE AND INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY FOR STUDENTS WITH AUTISM FIELD EXPERIENCE

credits: 1  

Prerequisite: Students must be in the AUTISM-NO program. Corequisite: EEX 4761. This course is a companion course to the Communication with Students with Autism, Families and Other Professionals course. Students will spend time in a classroom with children who have Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) in order to apply the knowledge gained in the paired theory course. Assignments and peer discussion relating to the observed application of material covered in the companion course will be submitted. 30 clock hours are required with a child or children diagnosed with ASD in a school setting. 15 contact hours.

EGN 1002   INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: MAC 1105 and any MAC prefix. This is an introductory course with an overview of the engineering professions and the skills required to become a good engineer. The student is introduced to engineering work habits, responsibilities, engineering communication, engineering fundamentals, and problem solving techniques used across all engineering disciplines. Contact hours 47.

EGN 3443   STATISTICS FOR ENGINEERS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: MAC 2312 and admission to ORTHO-BAS or permission of the program director. This course is an introduction to basic concepts of statistical analysis with special emphasis on engineering applications. The course covers the topics of probability, discrete and continuous random variables and their sampling distributions, joint probability distributions, descriptive statistics, estimation of parameters, statistical inference for one and two samples, simple linear regression, and design of experiments.

EGS 1001   INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING

credits: 3  

This course # will become EGN 1002 effective 7/26/2014. Prerequisite: MAC 1105 or any MAC prefix. This is an introductory course with an overview of the engineering professions and the skills required to become a good engineer. The student is introduced to engineering work habits, responsibilities, engineering communication, engineering fundamentals, and problem solving techniques used across all engineering disciplines. 47 contact hours.

EME 2040   INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY

credits: 3  

This is a survey level course designed to introduce preservice teachers to the proper methods for using technology in contemporary education settings. 47 contact hours. 

EMS 1055C   EMERGENCY MEDICAL RESPONDER

credits: 5  

Prerequisite: Computer/Information Literacy Competency Requirement. This survey course is based on the National Standard Curriculum for Emergency Medical Responders at scenes of accident and/or illness is designed to prepare the student for emergency care of a victim, providing the skills and knowledge of care prior to the arrival of the Emergency Medical Technician/Paramedic. Recognition of symptoms and signs of impending danger to the patient's life and the accepted treatment modes for the conditions will be taught as well as techniques for extrication (light duty) of the accident victim. 100 contact hours.

EMS 1059C   EMERGENCY MEDICAL RESPONDER

credits: 3  

This course # will become EMS 1055C effective 7/26/2014. This survey course is based on the National Standard Curriculum for Emergency Medical Responders at scenes of accident and/or illness is designed to prepare the student for emergency care of a victim, providing the skills and knowledge of care prior to the arrival of the Emergency Medical Technician/Paramedic. Recognition of symptoms and signs of impending danger to the patient's life and the accepted treatment modes for the conditions will be taught as well as techniques for extrication (light duty) of the accident victim. 47 contact hours.

EMS 1119   FUNDAMENTALS OF EMERGENCY MEDICAL CARE

credits: 6  

Prerequisites: Appropriate score on the Computerized Placement Test and possession of “Professional Rescuer” level CPR card, HSC 1531, and admission to the EMT-ATD or EMS-PR program. Corequisites: EMS 1119L and EMS 1411. This course is an introduction to the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required in emergency medical care situations, and is taught in accordance with the latest National Standard Curriculum/EMS Education Standards for the Emergency Medical Technician. Included is information concerning basic structure and function of body systems and recent state of the art procedures required of the emergency medical technician. 92 contact hours.

EMS 1119L   FUNDAMENTALS OF EMERGENCY MEDICAL CARE LABORATORY

credits: 2  

Prerequisites: Appropriate score on the Placement Test and “Professional Rescuer” CPR card. Corequisites: EMS 1119 and EMS 1411. Laboratory practice in emergency procedures for life-threatening disease, accident, or illness is closely supervised to foster confidence in the student's abilities to apply theory in a laboratory setting. Techniques for patient assessment, evaluation and treatment are practiced in an assessment-based format in a laboratory setting. 64 contact hours.

EMS 1411   FUNDAMENTALS OF EMERGENCY MEDICAL CARE CLINICAL EXPERIENCE

credits: 1  

Prerequisites: Appropriate score on the Placement Test and “Professional Rescuer or Health Care Provider” level CPR card. Corequisites: EMS 1119 and EMS 1119L. The student will be assigned to contract agencies for patient care experience with hospital agencies for emergency department experience under the direct supervision of hospital personnel. The course is designed as a clinical component where the individual gains an appreciation of emergency and non-emergency patient care in relationship to the knowledge and practical skills learned in the classroom. 36 contact hours.

EMS 1421   EMT FIELD INTERNSHIP

credits: 2  

Prerequisites: EMS 1119/1119L and EMS 1411 all with grades of "C" or better. The student will be assigned to contract agencies for patient care experience with fire-rescue and ambulance units under the direct supervision of State of Florida certified EMTs and Paramedics. The course is designed as a competency-based field component where the individual gains emergency and non-emergency insight into the mechanics of assisting the ill or injured patient in the out-of-hospital environment. 96 contact hours.

EMS 1522C   GENERAL PHARMACOLOGY FOR THE EMS PROVIDER

credits: 2  

Prerequisite: Successful completion of EMS 1119, EMS 1119L, EMS 1411, EMS 1421, and either BSC 1084C or BSC 2085/L and 2086/L, and EMS 2600C, with grades of “C” or better, or EMS program administrator approval. Corequisites: EMS 2601, EMS2601L, and EMS 2664. This course will provide the EMS student with general pharmacology concepts and principles in the management of client care. The knowledge and skills required for safe, effective administration of therapeutic drugs and indications and contraindications associated with drug therapy are an integral part of this course. 47 contact hours.

EMS 2331   EMERGENCY CARE IN-FLIGHT

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: paramedic, registered nurse, respiratory therapist or other advanced professional medical license or graduate standing. The student will learn the effects of altitudinal change on the human body in health, illness and injury; and the use of normal and emergency equipment during air transport in the care of a patient. The student will become acquainted with types of air transport used for ambulance purposes and the laws governing them. 47 contact hours.

EMS 2600C   INTRODUCTION TO PARAMEDIC PRACTICE

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: Computer/Information Literacy Competency Requirement met, admission to the Paramedic CT program, and current Florida EMT certification. SPC students who have successfully completed EMS 1119, 1119L, 1411 and 1421 with a “C” or better at SPC may enroll in this class pending successful certification as a FL certified EMT. These students must have a current FL EMT certification before the end of EMS 2600C to continue in the SPC Paramedic program. Prerequisites: BSC 1084C or (BSC 2085/L and BSC 2086/L), and HSC 1531, with grades of “C” or better, OR corequisites: BSC 1084C or (BSC 2086/L), and HSC 1531. This course is an in-depth introduction to the U.S. Department of Transportation, EMT Paramedic: National Standard Curriculum/EMS Education Standards which includes aspects of the prehospital environment which focuses on the well-being of the paramedic, paramedic roles and responsibilities, Emergency Medical Services (EMS) systems, illness and injury prevention, medical and legal considerations, ethics, history-taking, therapeutic communication, lifespan development, and basic patient assessment. 96 contact hours.

EMS 2601   PARAMEDIC THEORY I

credits: 6  
Prerequisites: BSC 1084C or (BSC 2085/2085L and BSC 2086/2086L), HSC 1531, EMS 2600C, with grades of "C" or better, admission to Paramedic CT and current Florida EMT certification. Corequisites: EMS 2601L, EMS 2664, and EMS 1522C. This course is an in-depth study of the U.S. Department of Transportation, EMT Paramedic: National Standard Curriculum/EMS Education Standards which include aspects of the prehospital environment which focuses on general patient assessment and assessment-based management; airway and ventilation assessment; venous access and medication administration; clinical decision-making; shock and fluid resuscitation; pathophysiology and general pharmacology; aspects of advanced training on prehospital trauma and burn management; the respiratory system which includes disease pathophysiology and respiratory arrest management; management of geriatric and psychiatric patients; patients experiencing anaphylaxis and patients with disorders of the neurological system related to trauma and the pulmonary system. 92 contact hours.

EMS 2601L   PARAMEDIC LABORATORY I

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Current certification as a Florida EMT. Corequisite: EMS 2601. This laboratory course is an in-depth study of the U.S. Department of Transportation, EMT-Paramedic: National Standard Curriculum/EMS Education Standards, which covers "hands-on" skills, related to Paramedic Theory I. 96 contact hours.

EMS 2602   PARAMEDIC THEORY II

credits: 8  
Prerequisites: EMS 2601/2601L with grades of "C" or better and current certification as a Florida EMT. Corequisites: EMS 2602L and EMS 2665. This course is an in-depth study of the U.S. Department of Transportation, EMT-Paramedic: National Standard Curriculum/EMS Education Standards, which includes aspects of prehospital medical emergencies related to the cardiovascular systems, disease pathophysiology, cardiac arrest management, the nervous system, toxicology, endocrine emergencies, infectious disease, obstetrical, gynecological, neonatal assessment and management, pediatrics, and patients requiring special considerations. 120 contact hours.

EMS 2602L   PARAMEDIC LABORATORY II

credits: 4  
Prerequisites: EMS 2601/2601L with grades of "C" or better. Corequisites: EMS 2602 and EMS 2665. This laboratory course is an in-depth study of the U.S. Department of Transportation, EMT-Paramedic: National Standard Curriculum/EMS Education Standards which covers "hands-on" skills related to Paramedic Theory II. 128 contact hours.

EMS 2659   PARAMEDIC FIELD INTERNSHIP

credits: 5  
Prerequisites: Current certification as a Florida EMT, completion of all paramedic program courses, including support courses, and EMS program director approval. This capstone course is an in-depth study of the U.S. Department of Transportation, EMT Paramedic: National Standard Curriculum/EMS Education Standards which include aspects of the prehospital environment which focuses on the field clinical application of skills and the application of critical thinking skills to paramedic practice. Course emphasis gives the student, under direct paramedic supervision, the opportunity to integrate knowledge and skill to direct application of patient care. 240 contact hours.

EMS 2664   PARAMEDIC CLINICAL I

credits: 3  
Corequisites: EMS 2601, EMS 2601L, and current Florida certification as an Emergency Medical Technician-Basic. This course involves the hospital and field clinical application of skills related to paramedic theory and application presented in Paramedic Theory I and Paramedic Laboratory I. 120 contact hours.

EMS 2665   PARAMEDIC CLINICAL II

credits: 2  

Prerequisites: Current Florida certification as an EMT and EMS 2664 with grade of "C" or better. Corequisites: EMS 2602/2602L. This course is an in-depth study of the U.S. Department of Transportation, EMT Paramedic: National Standard Curriculum/EMS Education Standards which include aspects of the pre-hospital environment, which focuses on the hospital and field clinical application of skills related to paramedic theory and application presented in  Paramedic Theory II and Paramedic Laboratory II. 96 contact hours.

EMS 2931C   PARAMEDIC SEMINAR

credits: 6  
Prerequisite: Current certification as a Florida paramedic required, and graduation from an Emergency Medical Services (EMS) program accredited by the Committee on Accreditation of Emergency Medical Services Programs(CoAEMSP)/Committee on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP). Current CardioPulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) certification required. Program director approval required. Those students not possessing current Basic Trauma Life Support (BTLS) – Advanced Provider or equivalent Pre-hospital Trauma Life Support must complete this course s through St. Petersburg College 's EMS Open Campus before registering for this capstone course to be eligible for course completion and graduation. This course has group discussion and skills instruction on the changing role of the professional paramedic and this course will update the certified paramedic on the latest National Standard Curriculum for the EMT-Paramedic. Includes a 16 hour pediatrics course. Special in-depth study and assignments will be required to demonstrate competence in the latest National Standard Curriculum requirements. May be taken twice for a total of 12 credits. 92 contact hours.

EMS 4314   ADVANCED EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES (EMS) ADMINISTRATION

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Admission to Public Safety BAS or Health Services Administration BAS. This course is for students interested in the field of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) administration. The focus of the course will allow the student to gain a global overview of EMS system administration and financing of EMS operations, risk management, quality improvement programs, personnel development and management. This course will foster skills to enhance the student’s ability to function in an administrative setting in the EMS profession. 47 contact hours.

EMS 4315   ANALYTICAL APPROACHES TO EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES (EMS) SYSTEMS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to Public Safety BAS or Health Services Administration BAS. This course is for students interested in the field of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) administration. The focus of the course will be a global overview of EMS System design and operation. The course will also incorporate research as it pertains to EMS in system management, clinical, and human performance. 47 contact hours.

EMS 4316   EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES (EMS) INJURY PREVENTION AND PUBLIC HEALTH

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Admission to Public Safety Administration BAS or Health Services Administration BAS. This course is for students interested in the field of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) injury prevention and public health. The focus of the course will be a global overview of EMS injury prevention for EMS personnel and the community. Additionally the course will enhance the student’s understanding of the role of public health and EMS. 47 contact hours.

ENC 0015   DEVELOPMENTAL WRITING I

credits: 0  

This course was formerly ENC 0010. This college preparatory course is designed to develop skills in grammar, usage, mechanics, sentence structure, and vocabulary by means of practice in sentence construction and paragraph development. It is intended to prepare students for successful completion of other college-preparatory and college-level courses in writing. (Note: ENC 0015 may not be taken concurrently with ENC 1101 or ENC 1121H.) Five class and laboratory hours weekly. 77 contact hours.

ENC 0025   DEVELOPMENTAL WRITING II

credits: 0  

This course # was formerly ENC 0020. Prerequisite: ENC 0015 or appropriate score on the SPC placement test. This college preparatory course is designed to improve basic writing skills in grammar, usage, spelling, capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, and vocabulary by means of practice in paragraphs and short essays. It is intended to prepare students for successful completion of college-level writing courses in English. 77 contact hours.

ENC 0027   DEVELOPMENTAL READING AND WRITING II

credits: 0  

Prerequisites: (REA 0001 or REA 0007) and (ENC 0010 or ENC 0015) each with a minimum grade of C; or appropriate scores on SPC placement test; or approval of Program Administrator. This developmental course provides integrated reading and writing instruction. The skills taught in this course include literal comprehension, critical comprehension, vocabulary, and Standard American English grammar and usage. Students will improve their skills through reading selected passages, including textbook selections, and by composing effective paragraphs and essays in a variety of rhetorical modes. This course is intended to prepare students for successful completion of college-level courses requiring intensive reading and writing. 92 contact hours.

ENC 0056   BASIC WRITING II: MY BRIDGE TO SUCCESS

credits: 0  

Prerequisite: Appropriate score on the SPC placement test or permission of a Communications Department program administrator. This college preparatory course is designed to improve basic writing skills in grammar, diction and usage, punctuation, sentence structure and variety, and paragraph and essay composition using course modules. Course strategies will include one-on-one instruction, small group instruction, and computer instruction in a lab setting. A diagnostic assessment will determine placement into course modules as well as exit requirements. This course is intended to prepare students for successful completion of college-level writing courses in English. 17 contact hours minimum.

ENC 1101   COMPOSITION I

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: (ENC 0025) and (prerequisite or corequisite REA 0017) or EAP 1695 or appropriate scores on the Writing and Reading placement tests. This course is designed to develop composition skills. It emphasizes the development of the multi-paragraph essay and includes practice in information retrieval from electronic and other sources, as well as in the selection, restriction, organization, and development of topics. It also offers the student opportunities to improve proficiency with sentence structure, diction, and mechanics. Selected writing samples are examined as models of form and as sources of ideas for the student's own writing. Conferences provide individual instruction. Sections of computer-assisted and individualized instruction are offered. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. Credit is only given for one of the following: ENC 1101, ENC 1121H or IDS 1101H. 47 contact hours.

ENC 1102   COMPOSITION II

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: (ENC 1101 with a minimum grade of C or ENC 1121H with a minimum grade of C) and (REA 0017 with a minimum grade of C or EAP 1695 with a minimum grade of C) or appropriate scores on the English and Reading placement test. This course builds upon the skills developed in Composition I. It provides further instruction in the planning, organization, and writing of essays. It stresses methods of library research including information retrieval from electronic sources, and emphasizes writing of the research paper and the paper of literary interpretation. The reading includes selections from at least two forms of literature. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. Credit is not given for both ENC 1102 and ENC 1122H. 47 contact hours.

ENC 1121H   HONORS COMPOSITION I

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Appropriate score on the SPC placement test or approval of the dean. This is a course designed to develop the expository writing skills of academically talented students so they can write effectively. It emphasizes prewriting techniques, organizational techniques, and essay writing techniques. Conferences are provided for individualized instruction. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements as outlined in the General Education Requirements. Credit is only given for one of the following: ENC 1121H, ENC 1101 or IDS 1101H. 47 contact hours.

ENC 1122H   HONORS COMPOSITION II

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: (ENC 1101 and appropriate score on the SPC placement test) or ENC 1121H or IDS 1101H or IDS 1111H or approval of the dean. This course builds upon the skills developed in Honors Composition. It provides the academically talented student further opportunity to learn to write effectively. It emphasizes writing papers of literary interpretation, using the library, finding and evaluating primary and secondary source material, and employing that material in formally documented research papers. Conferences for individualized instruction are provided. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements as outlined in the General Education Requirements. Credit is only given for one of the following: ENC 1122H or ENC 1102. 47 contact hours.

ENC 2210   TECHNICAL WRITING

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: ENC 1101 or ENC 1121H. This course is offered for students desiring experience in various types of technical writing, such as process reports, investigative reports, feasibility studies, instructions, memoranda, and letters. Concentration is on practice in analyzing and developing reports, in collecting and organizing data, and in preparing the formal and informal report. This course has value in the fields of business administration, military, engineering, health, hospitality, law enforcement, architecture, building construction, and science. Assignments are related to the individual interest of the student. This course has a substantial writing requirement. 47 contact hours.

ENG 2100   INTRODUCTION TO MOTION PICTURES

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: ENC 0025 or EAP 1695 or a satisfactory score on the SPC Placement Test. This course is a general survey of motion pictures emphasizing the synthesis of the dramatic, narrative, artistic, and technical components of the medium. This course has a substantial writing requirement. 47 contact hours.

ENG 2103   WORLD CINEMA

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: ENC 0025 or EAP 1695 or appropriate score on the SPC placement test. This is a survey course designed to introduce students to the cinematic arts of countries from around the world. Emphasis will be given to the works of the acknowledged masters of foreign cinema including, but not limited to, those from Europe, Asia, and Latin America. This course will focus on the spiritual, intellectual and moral issues that unite humankind worldwide in the 21st century as well as the techniques in editing and mise en scene that affect film’s impact upon an audience. This course has a substantial writing requirement. 47 contact hours.

ENL 2012   BRITISH LITERATURE I (to 1800)

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: ((ENC 1101 or ENC 1121H or IDS 1101H) and (REA 0017 or EAP 1695 or appropriate score on the placement test.)) This course is a humanistic study of British literature from Anglo-Saxon times through the 18th Century. Representative selections from each period are studied for interpretation, background, artistic qualities, and ethical meaning, with emphasis on human values and application to life. This course also stresses methods of library research and emphasizes composition of the research paper and the paper of literary interpretation. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. Credit is not given for both ENL 2012 and ENL 2012H. 47 contact hours.

ENL 2012H   HONORS BRITISH LITERATURE I (to 1800)

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: (IDS 1101H or ENC 1121H) or (IDS 1101H or ENC 1121H and acceptance into the Honors College ) or approval of the program director. This course is a humanistic and interdisciplinary study of British literature from the 8th through the 18th Century. Representative authors and selections from each period are studied for interpretation, background, artistic qualities, and ethical meaning, with emphasis on human values. This course also stresses methods of research and emphasizes writing research-based papers, including literary interpretation and critical analysis using primary and secondary sources. Independent research and interdisciplinary connections are encouraged for students to make connections to other related areas of humanities, philosophy and literature in the Honors Program. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. Credit is not given for both ENL 2012H and ENL 2012. 47 contact hours.

ENL 2022   BRITISH LITERATURE II (Since 1800)

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: (ENC 1101 or ENC 1121H or IDS 1101H) and (REA 0017 or EAP 1695) or appropriate score on the SPC placement test. This course is a study of British literature of the 19th and 20th centuries from the same approach as that of British Literature I. This course also stresses methods of library research and emphasizes composition of the research paper and the paper of literary interpretation. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. British Literature I is not necessarily a prerequisite to this course. 47 contact hours.

ENT 1000   INTRODUCTION TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP

credits: 3  
This is a practical course designed to assist students in determining if they have the traits and skill set to be entrepreneurs. It is designed for students who think they may want to start a business for the first time or for those already in business seeking to expand or diversify. Emphasis will be placed on the practical aspects of creating and running a business and on teaching the skills and tools for effective decision making. Topics will include: feasibility studies, SWOT analysis (strengths, weakness, opportunities, threats), market research, opportunity recognition, idea and product development, team formation, resource funding, and basics for business plan development. 47 contact hours.

ENT 1012   ENTREPRENEURSHIP MANAGEMENT

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: ENT 1000. This course seeks to provide the knowledge, skills and tools for students to successfully plan, design and manage a new business venture. It is intended for those students considering self-employment for the first time or for those who are already committed as entrepreneurs. The processes of launching an entrepreneurial venture and learning the skills and techniques necessary for effective management, growth and exit strategy will be covered in the course. Students will analyze the decision making models and strategies and apply them in the management of business ventures. 47 contact hours.

ENT 2010   PLANNING THE ENTREPRENEURIAL VENTURE

credits: 3  

Prerequisite ENT 1000: This is a practical course designed to guide students through the process of planning and preparing a business plan for the purposes of launching and funding an entrepreneurial venture. It is created and developed for students who have a business idea they are interested in pursuing as a start-up company or have an existing business they are planning to expand or diversify. Emphasis will be placed on the necessary research and analysis that is a required part of writing a business plan and the basics for launching and financing a new venture. 47 contact hours.

ENT 2120   ENTREPRENEURIAL MARKETING & SALES

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: ENT 1000. This course provides the knowledge, skills and tools for students to successfully plan and research the marketing components and financial aspects of launching a new business venture. This is a practical course intended for those students considering self-employment for the first time or for those who are already committed as entrepreneurs and seeking to expand or diversify their product or service offerings. Students will research target markets, pricing and product placement, competition, study feasibility, and learn the budgeting process critical to business success. Students will analyze decision making models and strategies as they pertain to marketing, sales and financing a business venture. 47 contact hours.

ESC 1000   EARTH SCIENCE

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017 and MAT 0028) or (EAP 1695 and MAT 0028). Earth Science is designed to acquaint the student with the integrating principles and theories of the Earth Sciences and with the practice of the scientific method. The student is afforded the opportunity to be exposed to useful knowledge in selected areas of Earth Science. 47 contact hours.

ESC 1000L   EARTH SCIENCE LAB

credits: 1  
Pre- or corequisite: ESC 1000. This course is a laboratory experience to accompany Earth Science for students who are non-science majors. The laboratory exercises will emphasize the study of applications to the principles of earth science. (This course may not be taken for credit subsequent to receiving a grade of “C” or better in any lab course with a GLY prefix.) 45 contact hours.

ETD 1320C   INTRODUCTION TO CAD

credits: 3  
The student will learn to use the major features of AutoCAD to make graphic displays including basic geometric figures, orthographic views of three-dimensional objects and pictorial drawings of three-dimensional objects. The major topics include the AutoCAD drawing, utility, file handling, text, editing, dimensioning and plotting features. 77 contact hours.

ETD 1340C   AUTOCAD II

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: ETD 1320C or equivalent. This course is a continuation of Introduction to CAD. The student will learn the advanced topics in AutoCAD using intermediate techniques of AutoCAD software to develop three dimensional drawings, construction drawings and architectural drawings. The major topics include plotting by various methods, use of the rotation option to draw auxiliary views, extended work with hatching, extended work with blocks and wblocks, dimensioning, use of attributes, library files, polylines, solids, system variables, and customizing AutoCAD. 77 contact hours.

ETD 1350C   AUTOCAD III 3-D MODELING

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: ETD 1320C or permission of the program director. AutoCAD III is a continuation of the Introduction to CAD, and AutoCAD II. This course covers the construction, viewing, and plotting of three-dimensional drawings of objects, including construction and architectural drawings. The major topics involve the construction of three-dimensional drawings by the use of various AutoCAD three-dimensional drawing facilities including (1) prismatic-object construction, (2) preconfigured primitive objects, (3) three-dimensional coordinates, and (4) three-dimensional surface entities. 77 contact hours.

ETD 1390C   INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURAL REVIT

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: ETD 1320C or permission of program director. This is an introduction course using Revit architectural software to produce three dimensional (3-D) designs and details of buildings. Topics consist of the techniques and methods to create architectural buildings to include: site plans, floor plans, roof design, 3-D photo-realistic rendering, and creating two dimensional (2-D) architectural drawings from the construction’s documents set of structural drawings. 77 contact hours.

ETD 2364C   INTRODUCTION TO SOLIDWORKS

credits: 3  
This course is an introduction to the new designing techniques and capabilities of solid modeling using the SolidWorks software. Topics include the integration of advance parametric solid modeling drawing tools into SolidWorks. 77 contact hours.

ETD 2368C   ADVANCED SOLIDWORKS

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: ETD 2364C or permission of instructor. This course presents the advanced use of new designing techniques and capabilities of solid modeling using the SolidWorks software, including the integration of the advanced parametric modeling and drawing tools for SolidWorks. The course topics to be covered include advanced 3D sketching, advanced work planes, advanced assembly construction, bottom up and top down, part configuration, SolidWorks Tool Box applications, concept of mold design, and creation of sheet metal parts and assemblies. 77 contact hours.

ETD 2369C   SOLIDWORKS ADVANCED APPLICATIONS

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: ETD 2364C or permission of program director. This course presents the complex application of advanced designing techniques and capabilities of solid modeling using the SolidWorks software, including the integration of the advanced parametric modeling and drawing tools for SolidWorks. The course topics covered include advanced sketching, advanced assembly construction, mechanism design, CosmosWorks, PhotoWorks, the creation of molded parts, and rendered parts. 77 contact hours.

ETD 2371C   RAPID PROTOTYPING, MODEL DESIGN AND FABRICATION

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: ETD 2364C, ETD 1350C, or permission of the program administrator. Rapid model making and prototype design is a valued part of many industries, including transportation, architecture, product, packaging, media, and entertainment. The growth of rapid prototyping technology has opened up new areas of development in design representation, such as simulation analysis and various rapid prototyping processes. This course will develop elements of creative thinking and problem solving used in the design process, including the techniques and methods used to construct prototypes and models. In the project aspect of this course, the students select a field of specialization to explore methods and materials in a number of options in industrial environment with the use of computer simulation, modeling, and rapid prototyping. 77 contact hours.

ETD 2382C   SOLIDWORKS SIMULATION DESIGN ANALYSIS

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: ETD 2364C or permission from the program administrator. This course will use the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) theory topics to cover static component forces and resultant force analysis of basic shapes using SolidWorks simulation design analysis. The major topics will address model definition, model shape and setup, analysis type based on environmental conditions, analysis assumptions and limitations, convergence techniques that will lead to a more exact solution to the analysis, interpreting the results correctly, and using these results to optimize the baseline design based on design requirements. 77 contact hours.

ETD 2392C   ADVANCED ARCHITECTURAL REVIT

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: ETD 1390C or permission of the program administrator. This is an advanced course of Autodesk Revit to create, design and produce construction and schematic drawings of mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems of a building project. Topics include the techniques used to create architectural building drawings to include an overview of the Building Information Modeling (BIM) process, including the design integration of the various building disciplines: architectural, interior design, structural, mechanical, electrical and plumbing (MEP). 77 contact hours.

ETE 3003   FOUNDATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION

credits: 3  

This course is an introduction to the field of technology education. State and national curriculum trends are analyzed. The International Technology Education Associations Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology will be used extensively by students. 47 contact hours. This course also has 15 hours of school based instruction in approved public school locations.

ETE 3203   PROGRAM MANAGEMENT: TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION

credits: 2  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Technology of Education (6-12) BS program. This course covers planning, organizing, motivating and managing of the learning environment in technology education classrooms and laboratories. Topics include program standards and evaluation, record keeping, budgeting, professional development, lab safety, teacher liability, advisory committees, connections to industry and community, and student organizations. 32 contact hours.

ETE 3323   INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS IN MIDDLE SCHOOL TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION

credits: 3  

Corequisite: EVT 3946. This course prepares pre-service educators to design, develop, implement and evaluate effective curricula materials, methods and assessments in middle school technology education. The course focuses on the selection of standards-based teaching methods and assessment strategies for specific instructional settings. Curricula will be developed using the Sunshine State Standards, Standards for Technological Literacy and Florida Curriculum Frameworks for middle school Technology Education courses. 47 contact hours. Field experiences will be incorporated into EVT 3946.

ETE 3402C   MATERIAL and PROCESSES WITH LAB

credits: 4  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Technology Education BS program. This laboratory-based course is an introduction to industry processes used to form usable products from wood, metal, and composite materials. Students will study and execute a variety of industrial processes including forming, separating, fabricating, conditioning and finishing. Emphasis will also be placed on the design process and the selection of appropriate materials for specific product and structural applications. Students will become proficient processing various industrial materials and writing curriculum. This course serves as a foundation for all other laboratory courses requiring the processing of materials. Safe and efficient use of tools and machines is stressed and incorporated in all facets of the course. 92 contact hours.

ETE 3473C   MANUFACTURING and TRANSPORTATION WITH LAB

credits: 4  

This laboratory-based course focuses on the control of equipment and processes with advanced technology. Students will learn about computer-aided manufacturing ( CAM ), computer numerical control (CNC), robotics, programmable controllers and th e emerging automated transportation systems by which people, raw materials and finished products are moved. Students will engage in a variety of problem solving activities to design, produce, test, and analyze systems in each area. Safe use of manufacturing tools will be stressed in all facets of the course. 92 contact hours.

ETE 3946   INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION PRACTICUM

credits: 1  

Admission to Technology Education 6-12 program. Corequisite(s): ETE 3323. This course is designed to give practical experiences to students through field experience in public middle school classrooms. Students will report to public middle schools as observers and instructional participants in Technology Education. These field experiences will be incorporated into classroom discussions, investigations and reports, and various strategies for probing understanding within Instructional Methods in Middle School Technology Education. This course addresses specific Sunshine State Standards, subject matter competencies and pedagogy pertinent to the discipline and required for certification. 32 contact hours. This course has sixty (60) hours of school-based experiences in approved public middle schools.

ETE 4333   INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS IN SECONDARY TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Technology Education (6-12) BS program. Corequisite: EVT 4947. This course prepares pre-service educators to design, develop, implement and evaluate effective curriculum materials, methods and assessments in high school Technology Education. The course focuses on the selection of standards-based teaching methods and assessment strategies for specific instructional settings. Curricula will be developed using the Sunshine State Standards, Standards for Technological Literacy and Florida Curriculum Frameworks for secondary technology education courses. 47 contact hours. Field experiences will be incorporated into EVT 4947.

ETE 4414C   INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY WITH LAB

credits: 4  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Technology Education BS program. This laboratory-based course focuses on the fundamental concepts of information technology, communication design, graphics communications, digital imaging, web page, audio and video production, and desktop publishing. The emphasis is on a broad range of digital information and communications technologies and how to present them in technology education classrooms. Practical hands-on assignments will be used to reinforce learning. 92 contact hours.

ETE 4434C   ENERGY AND POWER SYSTEMS WITH LAB

credits: 4  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Technology Education BS program. This laboratory-based course is a survey of energy forms and power systems, impacts of energy choices and electrical and selected electronics principles. Students will explore emerging electrical and electronics technologies such as solar power, nano solar technology, and fuel cells in terms of their implications for global societies, industries, and future careers. Students will learn practical concepts of DC circuits, resistance, power and magnetism, AC circuits, capacitance, inductance, reactance, impedance, phase, and circuit analysis. Laboratory exercises will allow students to build and test circuits, use electronic instruments, and design and construct energy-generating and power-transforming devices. This course serves as a foundation for all other laboratory courses. Safe use of electricity and electrical equipment will be stressed in all facets of the course. 92 contact hours.

ETE 4444   TECHNOLOGICAL DESIGN

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Technology Education BS program. This course provides a broad overview of the knowledge and processes of design. Students will study the technological problem solving process. Students will study the elements, principles and processes of design. Topics will include English and metric measurement, mechanical design and virtual design. Students will learn freehand technical sketching, basic elements of two-dimensional design and computer-aided drafting. Required student work will include a wide range of design problem solving and technical illustrations. 47 contact hours.

ETE 4940   INTERNSHIP: TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 6-12

credits: 12  

Prerequisites: Successful completion of all Technology Education BS program requirements and passing of all sections of the General Knowledge and Professional Education Exam. This course requires a teacher candidate to demonstrate competency on the twelve Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPs) at thepre-professional level during one semester of full day internship in a public or private school approved by the Dean. The internship also includes a series of mandatory professional leadership seminars. Contact hours: a minimum of 35 hours per week for 15 weeks.

ETE 4947   INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS FOR SECONDARY TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION PRACTICUM

credits: 1  

Admission to Technology Education 6-12 program. Corequisite(s): ETE 4333. This course is designed to give practical experiences to students through field experience in public high school classrooms. Students will report to public high schools as observers and instructional participants in technology education. Field experiences will be incorporated into Instructional Methods in Secondary Technology Education. 32 contact hours. This course has sixty (60) hours of school-based experience in approved public schools.

ETI 1030   REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT FOR MEDICAL DEVICES

credits: 3  

This course will provide an understanding of the basics of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation and compliance for medical devices including how the various activities within a medical device company are affected by the FDA regulations. Additional coverage will include the applicable laws and regulatins enforced by the FDA; international standards and regulations; the regulations controlling medical device design and development; the medical device approval process; laboratory and clinical studies; the introduction to the Quality System Regulations (QSRs); and the FDA inspection process. 47 contact hours.

ETI 1110   INTRODUCTION TO QUALITY ASSURANCE

credits: 3  
This course defines the role of quality in an industrial environment. Topics include the use of quality management techniques and quality philosophies, process development, techniques used for evaluation, approaches used on continuous operations, methods used to control quality, and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) series of standards. The responsibility of quality assurance during the engineering, manufacturing, and marketing of a product is also covered. 47 contact hours.

ETI 1420   MANUFACTURING PROCESSES AND MATERIALS I

credits: 3  
This course provides coverage of the characteristics, fundamentals, and manufacturing properties of materials, including metal alloys, polymers, ceramics, and composites. The metal-casting processes and the shaping and forming processes are also covered along with the machines needed for manufacturing. 47 contact hours.

ETI 1622   CONCEPTS OF LEAN AND SIX-SIGMA

credits: 3  
This course provides an introduction to the basic principles, and theories of lean manufacturing. Lean manufacturing involves identifying and eliminating non-value-adding activities in design, production, and supply chain management. The course introduces the concepts of Juran, Demming, Taylor, Ford, Shingo, and Ohno. The coverage also includes topics related to cost reduction, work-free manufacturing, continuous flow, Kaizen, the 5S’s, value stream mapping, modular manufacturing, and overall equipment effectiveness (OEE). 47 contact hours.

ETI 1628   DEVELOPING AND COACHING SELF-DIRECTED WORK TEAMS

credits: 3  
This course begins with an exploration of teams and how they work. Manufacturing teams create the opportunity to mix complementary technical work skills to improve the production process. The coverage includes the principles and tools used by self-directed teams in identifying and solving problems in the workforce. 47 contact hours.

ETI 1701   INDUSTRIAL SAFETY

credits: 3  
This course focuses on the theories and principles of occupational safety and health in a practical and useful real world job related setting. The major topics include the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) compliance, safety standards, code enforcement, ergonomic hazards, mechanical hazards, falling, lifting, electrical hazards, fire hazards, industrial hygiene, radiation, noise, emergencies, and environmental safety. 47 contact hours.

ETI 2031   RISK MANAGEMENT AND ASSESSMENT FOR MEDICAL DEVICES

credits: 3  

This course provides the students with an in-depth understanding of the principles and techniques of identifying, evaluating, and controlling risks associated with the development and production of medical devices. This course will cover risk management planning, risk analysis process, and risk management reporting. Topics will include the relationship between regulatory requirements and risk management, tools for hazard identification, methods for the mitigation of risks, and approaches for analyzing risk verses benefit. 47 contact hours.

ETI 2032   CHANGE CONTROL AND DOCUMENTATION

credits: 3  
This course will cover the change control activities and procedures that apply to the design of systems, the components within those systems, labeling and packaging, device manufacturing processes, production equipment, and manufacturing materials. Additional topics will include all associated documentation such as the quality system procedures, standard operating procedures, the quality acceptance procedures and data forms, and product-specific documentation. 47 contact hours.

ETI 2041   MEDICAL DEVICE DESIGN AND MANUFACTURING

credits: 3  
This course will provide an understanding of the processes and procedures using the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation and compliance for the designing and manufacturing of medical devices. Topics include the design process, design tools and management, product and process development, documentation, verification and validation, post market surveillance, and corrective and preventative actions. 47 contact hours.

ETI 2171   QUALITY AUDITING FOR MEDICAL DEVICES

credits: 3  
This course presents the principles and techniques for assessing the adequacy of a quality system for a medical device manufacturer. Coverage includes evaluating the quality system as it conforms to FDA regulatory requirements, standards, review of standard audit terms, audit types, audit concepts, and methods for planning, conducting, and reporting audits. 47 contact hours.

ETI 2610   PRINCIPLES OF SIX SIGMA

credits: 3  
This course provides an introduction to the basic principles and theories of Six Sigma as used in the continual improvement process. The course examines the tools most common to six sigma projects and how and when to use them. Course coverage focuses on measurement methods, data collection, data integrity, and graphical methods of presenting findings. 47 contact hours.

ETI 2619   SIX SIGMA PROJECT MANAGEMENT

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: ETI 2624. This course provides the concepts and methods for implementing Six Sigma project management utilizing Six Sigma methodologies. The course will cover the aspects of developing projects, managing risk, understanding customers’ needs and requirements, estimating costs, developing schedules, integrating cost and schedule controls, and evaluating projects. This course will also utilize a variety of project management tools and performance measures including the model of define, measure, analyze, improve, and control (DMAIC). 47 contact hours.

ETI 2623   TOOLS FOR LEAN MANUFACTURING

credits: 3  
This course provides an overview of the Lean Manufacturing concepts with a working knowledge of the tools required to implement and maintain a Lean Manufacturing facility. Course coverage includes mistake proofing, the 5S’s for operators, quick changeover, Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE), cellular manufacturing, and the kanban system. 47 contact hours.

ETI 2624   SIX SIGMA BLACK BELT CONCEPTS

credits: 3  
This course addresses the roles and responsibilities required for a Six Sigma Black Belt candidate. This course also covers the advanced six sigma tools beyond those tools using the model of define, measure, analyze, improve, and control (DMAIC). The student will be required to exhibit a mastery of the concepts and tools through projects, exercises and case studies as they apply to both manufacturing and service industries. 47 contact hours.

ETI 2626   SIX SIGMA CAPSTONE PROJECT

credits: 3  
The student will develop a suitable Six Sigma project by utilizing the Six Sigma methodologies. A specific problem or set of problems will be identified and solved using the Six Sigma methods of improvement to deploy on the project. This course will emphasize the different phases of the project to include design, verification, and implementation. The completion of this project requires a written report and a formal presentation of the Six Sigma process. 47 contact hours.

ETI 2670   TECHNICAL ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

credits: 3  
This course defines the economic evaluation of engineering alternatives and analysis of cost allocation in technical operations. Topics include the time value of money and the economic impact of risk, inflation, depreciation, and capital budgeting with applications related to those areas. 47 contact hours.

ETI 3116   QUALITY MANAGEMENT

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: MAN 3504 and Admission into a baccalaureate program. This course helps students to understand how quality products, processes, and services require integration across complex systems of customers, suppliers, technology, and people. This course covers the fundamental methods used to define quality, as well as how to connect this definition to measures that can be analyzed to drive quality improvements and control performance. This course helps students understand, integrate, and apply quality management (Six Sigma) concepts and techniques to better plan, organize, lead, and control quality improvement projects that can help organizations to better focus on achieving their strategic goals and objectives. 47 contact hours.

ETI 3647   SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: MAN 3504 AND admission to the Technology Management BAS OR International Business BAS OR Business Administration BS, OR Sustainability Management BAS. This course builds on the basic concepts learned in operations management in order for students to further understand how to build and implement supply chain or value chain networks. Students learn principles, processes, technologies, strategies, and analytical techniques used to integrate global supply chain management best practices. Emphasis will be on the student developing an enterprise wide and systems view to manage the flow of information, physical distribution, and revenue required to deliver products and services from raw materials through end consumer use (and reverse flow). This course will incorporate basic supply chain management, customer demand management, inventory management, supplier relationship management, and logistic management as they relate to the core aspects of this management practice. 47 contact hours.

ETI 4448   APPLIED PROJECT MANAGEMENT

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to International Business BAS, Management & Organizational Leadership BAS, Business Administration BS, Sustainability Management BAS, or Technology Management BAS. The student should have a working knowledge of basic project management concepts and Project Management software tools. This course provides students with an understanding of the concepts of project management (PM) and its application in the information technology environment. Students will gain an understanding of the fundamentals of the project management framework and understand how to apply the nine project management areas – integration, scope, time, cost, quality, human resources, communications, risk and procurement management. The project management processes of initiating; planning, executing, controlling and closing used in information technology projects will be covered. Techniques suitable for management of large and small projects in business environments will be discussed. 47 contact hours.

ETM 1010C   MECHANICAL MEASUREMENT AND INSTRUMENTATION

credits: 3  
This course provides the basic foundation for both mechanical and electronic measurement techniques used in manufacturing environments. The course will integrate the concepts, principles, and techniques of mechanical measurement with the use of various types of instruments including micrometers, verniers, calipers, gages, and other types of measuring equipment. The course will also introduce the student to the basic measurement techniques employing electronic test equipment including the operation and usage of digital multimeters, function generators, and oscilloscopes. 47 contact hours.

ETS 2360   INTRODUCTION TO NANOTECHNOLOGY

credits: 3  

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts, definitions, and usage of nanotechnology.  The topic coverage will include the background and history of nanotechnology, the equipment used in nanometrology, the development of nanodevices, the materials of nanotechnology, and the application of nanotechnology used for different technologies. 47 contact hours.

EUH 1000   DEVELOPMENT OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION I

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017) or EAP 1695 or satisfactory score on the SPC placement test. This course covers the origins and development of western civilization beginning with the ancient world and classical civilizations, the Middle Ages, the transition to modern states and politics of power, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, and the Commercial Revolution of the 16th Century. Emphases are on the relevance of the political, social, economic and cultural trends of each period upon our present world society. This course partially satisfies the Gordon Rule writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. 47 contact hours.

EUH 1001   DEVELOPMENT OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION II

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017) or EAP 1695 or satisfactory score on the SPC placement test. This course covers the evolution and continuation of western civilization since the 16th Century. A study of governments from absolutism to democracy, European power politics; duels for world empire; scientific, cultural, political, social and industrial revolutions; nationalism, imperialism, and global conflicts. Emphasis placed on relevance of past history upon our present world society. This course partially satisfies the Gordon Rule writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. 47 contact hours.

EVR 1016   HAZARDOUS WASTE / MATERIALS MANAGEMENT

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: EVS 1001 and EVR 1858 or approval of the Dean or Academic Chair. This course is intended to provide multiple aspects of hazardous waste and materials management. The student will develop familiarity with local, state, and federal regulations that govern waste; discuss internal and external environmental site audits; and examine future trends in the generation, treatment, and storage of wastes. Emphasis will be placed on generation of hazardous wastes; treatment and reuse to reduce human environmental health risks; and how residual wastes should be stored to minimize health risks. Mechanisms of how wastes cause disease and environmental resource degradation will be presented. 47 contact hours.

EVR 1263   URBAN POLLUTION

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: EVS 1001, CHM 1025, CHM 1025L, ENC 0025 or REA 0017 or EAP 1695, and MAT 0028 or approval of the Dean or Academic Chair. This course is intended to provide an overview of urban pollution issues in a historical context and through examining current urban pollution priorities. Topics covered include the history of environmental services in urban America related to wastewater sanitation, water supply contamination, public refuse management, industrial waste impacts, air pollution, and surface water issues. An in-depth examination of advancements in environmental technological, management practices, and public service related to these topics will be pursued to achieve the requisite knowledge of urban pollution. 47 contact hours.

EVR 1310   RENEWABLE ENERGY RESOURCES, ENERGY EFFICIENCY & CONSERVATION METHODS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: EVS1001, ENC0025, REA0017 and MAT0028 or EAP1695 and MAT0028 or approval of the Dean or Academic Chair. This course is intended to provide an overview of energy resources with special attention to the leading renewable energy resources. Topics covered include the science of energy, historical context of energy use and policy, energy efficiency and conservation strategies, and a survey of all sources of energy (e.g., fossil fuel, nuclear, and renewable). An in-depth examination of recent advancements that include the environmental, economic, and social impacts of renewable energy will be pursued to achieve the requisite knowledge of energy issues. 47 contact hours.

EVR 1328   NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: (ENC 0025, MAT 0028, REA 0017) or (MAT 0028 and EAP 1695). This course is designed to present the history, major components, status, ecology, conservation, and management of natural resources. Emphasis is placed upon the ecology, conservation, and management of natural resources including studies and examination of techniques and management programs implemented in the region. 47 contact hours.

EVR 1357   WETLAND RESOURCES

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: (ENC 0025, REA 0017 and MAT 0028) or (EAP 1695 and MAT 0028) or approval of the Program Administrator. This course will introduce the student to the ecology and management of wetlands habitats. It will introduce the physical, biological and chemical factors that influence wetlands, as well as variations in these factors that serve to differentiate different wetlands types. The course will also introduce past and present representative legislation that impacts wetland preservation and management. 47 contact hours.

EVR 1858   ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATION AND COMPLIANCE

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: (ENC 0025, REA 0017 and MAT 0028) or (EAP 1695 and MAT 0028) or approval of the Dean or Academic Chair. This course is intended to provide an overview of environmental regulations and compliance issues related to current environmental law. Topics covered include the history and foundation of environmental regulations, current and possible future regulations and the manner in which compliance is achieved at local, state and federal levels. An in-depth examination of the applicable regulations and administrative compliance with administrative structure will be pursued to achieve the requisite knowledge of environmental issues. 47 contact hours.

EVR 2316   SOLAR ENERGY PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: EVS 1001 or approval of the Dean or Academic Chair. This course is intended to provide an overview of solar energy principles and applications. Topics covered include the science of solar energy, historical context of solar energy, its use, and related policy with an in-depth examination of solar thermal and solar electricity technologies. The environmental, economic, and social impacts of solar energy will be pursued to achieve the requisite knowledge of solar energy, including the issues, financial considerations, prospects, and potential related to solar energy applications. 47 contact hours.

EVR 2892C   ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS I

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: ENC1101, EVS1001, CHM1025 and CHM1025L or approval of the Dean or Academic Chair. This course is intended to build student knowledge, skills and experience in environmental sampling and analysis. Topics included are the Florida Department of Environmental Protection standard operating procedures for the collection of surface water, groundwater, wastewater, potable water systems, and sediment. Hands-on field activities will complement class room exercises related to these topics to achieve the requisite knowledge of environmental sampling and analysis. 77 contact hours.

EVR 2949   CO-OP WORK EXPERIENCE

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: Faculty Advisor/Co-op Coordinator or Program Director Approval. This course is designed to provide students with major-related, supervised, evaluated practical training work experiences which may be paid or voluntary. Students are graded on the basis of documented learning acquired through hands-on experiences in an actual work setting. The student must fulfill the requirement of 60 on-the-job hours for each credit earned in addition to written assignments.

EVS 1001   INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017 and MAT 0028) or (EAP 1695 and MAT 0028). This course applies the basic principles of ecology to relevant problems and topics related to the environmental interaction of humans with the earth. The course is designed to highlight current environmental concerns in modern society and to explore potential solutions exemplified by the presentation of specific case histories. This course will also cover sustainability definitions, assessment and actions from a multidisciplinary perspective to help learners create a personal definition that will inform their actions. The course will examine the environmental, economic, and social dimensions of sustainability. Sustainability principles, policies, and programs will be explored on the local, national and global level. This class will teach students how to understand the complex confluence of social systems, environmental economics and ecological literacy. 47 contact hours.


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