Course List


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PAD 3034   SURVEY OF PUBLIC POLICY

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the PSA-BAS program, Public Policy and Administration BS program or Educational Studies BS program. This course will provide the student broad exposure to public policy issues. Emphasis will be placed on determining public need and providing service delivery through program research and community input supported by budgeting and funding. Learning will be directed toward total service delivery models involving multidisciplinary approaches. 47 contact hours.

PAD 3311   PROGRAM PLANNING & EVALUATION

credits: 3  
This course examines training and education in a changing workplace and workforce from a systematic perspective. The student will learn how to improve individual, team, and organizational effectiveness by understanding how to design successful training interventions and learning experiences that can impart knowledge, skills, and attitudes to learners in the workplace. 47 contact hours.

PAD 3330   URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Public Policy and Administration BS Program and PUP 3040. This course provides a basic foundation into the principles of planning practices that imply and include the potential variations of substance as related to local government planning. Emphasis is placed on social, economic and housing planning and its relationship to conceptual frameworks, research perspectives, practical and political considerations, and public policy to include its origin, interpretation and implementation. Course content is guided by an understanding that community growth, and the inevitable changes associated with growth, are no longer accepted without challenge. 47 contact hours.

PAD 3724   FORECASTING TRENDS IN GANGS ENFORCEMENT

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Public Safety Administration BAS program. This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the methodology of forecasting in decision-making for public safety administrators. Specifically, the student will be exposed to forecasting models to anticipate trends in gang enforcement on a national and international scale. Emphasis will be placed on gang intervention, gang membership, and the use of forecasting to gain awareness of the need for administrative planning. 47 contact hours.

PAD 3820   FOUNDATIONS OF PUBLIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Must be taken in the student's first semester in the Public Safety Administration BAS program. This course is presented as an overview of the primary aspects of public safety administration. Major administrative, managerial and leadership components of public safety organizations will be examined. Also addressed will be administrative concerns for special issues and challenges, such as coordinated public safety approaches, post-9/11 administrative worldviews, ethical foundations, critical thinking and analysis, and innovative solutions for pragmatic public safety problems. The course will also provide the student with a framework for individual progress. This will include an initial supervisory/leadership/management skills assessment; the beginning development of an individualized development plan toward educational and career goals, with a personal portfolio; and preliminary planning to link continuous learning with the Capstone course at the end of the program. 47 contact hours.

PAD 3821   CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN PUBLIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: PAD 3820 and admission to the Public Safety Administration BAS Program. This course focuses on current issues and trends in the field of public safety administration. The course is structured to introduce management and administrative topics in public safety, examine the implications to the field, and formulate recommendations. This course will begin developing skills in project design and presentation. This course will enhance critical thinking skills. 47 contact hours.

PAD 3874   COMMUNITY RELATIONS THEORY AND PRACTICE

credits: 3  
This course will expose the student to community relations theory and practice within a broad range of public safety organizations. Students will understand why positive community perception of public safety is critical to funding and operational effectiveness. Each student will gain the insight and skills necessary to be effective in the community relations function of public safety administration. 47 contact hours.

PAD 4014   POLITICAL & SOCIO-ECONOMIC IMPACT OF GANGS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Public Safety Administration BAS, Gangs Enforcement Management Certificate or Educational Studies BS program. This course introduces the student to the interrelationship of gangs, public policy, political decision-making, and the social and economic ramifications. The course focuses student knowledge of contemporary gang issues, public policy paradigms, national social and economic trends, and the impact of gang activity in the community. 47 contact hours.

PAD 4046   MANAGING CONFLICT IN PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite(s): PAD 3820 and admission to the Public Safety Administration BAS Program. This course will examine the various conflict situations in public organizations to include how values and ethics influence the behavior of administrators in making decisions that affect the philosophy and goals of the organization. In addition, focus will be placed on the role of administrators as conflict managers by examining and providing various conflict resolution mechanisms and strategies that are cost-effective to the organization. 47 contact hours.

PAD 4204   PUBLIC FINANCE

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Public Safety Administration BAS program or Public Policy and Administration BS program. This course will provide the student with a firm understanding of all elements of public finance, from budget development to finance management, and from procurement to accounting and auditing. In addition, the course will explore alternative sources of public safety funding available to local government entities. A key component of the course will be the student’s preparation and presentation of a budget for a model city. 47 contact hours.

PAD 4232   GRANT ADMINISTRATION AND RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to Public Safety Administration BAS or Gangs Enforcement Management Certificate or Health Services Administration BAS or Health Services Administration BAS PAR or Public Policy and Administration BS or Educational Studies BS or Dental Hygiene BAS or Management & Organizational Leadership BAS programs. This course will explore and analyze the proposal-writing role in the resource development process. The student will be introduced to several concepts including researching alternative resources and funding opportunities, proposal writing, implementing and managing grants, developing community partnerships and collaborations, and becoming knowledgeable in policies and procedures related to public entities. 47 contact hours.

PAD 4332   STRATEGIC AND OPERATIONAL PLANNING

credits: 3  
The course is an examination of strategic planning in public and nonprofit organizations. The student will learn how strategic planning can guide and strengthen the effectiveness of an organization's performance. The ten step Strategy Change Cycle is introduced as an effective planning approach to accomplish strategic and operational planning in organizations. 47 contact hours.

PAD 4393   CRITICAL INCIDENT MANAGEMENT

credits: 3  

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Public Safety Administration BAS program and PAD 3820. This course examines disaster planning and emergency management. The course focuses on the four phases of planning, mitigation, response, and preparedness. The course includes FEMA and federal government NIMS ICS-700, and ICS 800 certifications. 47 contact hours.

PAD 4603   ADMINISTRATIVE LAW

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Public Safety Administration BAS program or Public Policy and Administration BS program. This course will examine the workings of Administrative Agencies with an emphasis on their power to make and enforce rules along with their power to investigate and adjudicate alleged violations. Particular focus will be placed on the means by which government administrators interact with these agencies. In addition to understanding the role of administrative agencies, the course will focus on using research skills to examine the constantly-changing rules that are promulgated by administrative agencies. 47 contact hours.

PAD 4878   PUBLIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION CAPSTONE

credits: 3  
Prerequisites: Senior standing or permission of the Dean. This course will afford the student an opportunity to observe and use analytical knowledge and research skills to define and confront a problem encountered by today's public safety administrators. The student will complete a project dealing with a current public safety issue and make recommendations for implementation of a solution. This course will foster implementation strategies concluding in a process of promoting efficient and effective management in a public safety agency or the student's chosen field of study. This course will examine the outcome of each student's individualized leadership plan toward educational and career goals with a personal portfolio developed in the course Foundations of Public Safety Administration course to ensure attainment of program goals. 47 contact hours.

PAD 4940   INTERNSHIP

credits: 1-3  

Prerequisites: Approval of the College-wide Internship Office and Admission to: Public Safety Administration BAS program or Permission of the Lead Instructor. This course provides the student with a supervised, practical learning experience in a work setting that is relevant to his/her program of study. Through course assignments and workplace projects the student will apply, connect, and extend academic theory and competencies for the purpose of building professional skills and affiliations. (60-180 contact hours). 
 

PCB 3023C   CELL BIOLOGY WITH LAB

credits: 4  

Prerequisite: BSC 2010/BSC 2010L, BSC 2011/BSC 2011L, CHM 2210/CHM2210L and CHM 2211/CHM 2211L. This course is a study of cell structure and function with emphasis on the properties of intracellular organelles. This course is concerned primarily with eukaryotic cells. Lectures are devoted to structural details and the molecular functions of the different sub-cellular components. Lectures will introduce topics such as exocytosis, endocytosis, membrane transport and the role of the cytoskeleton in this process, protein targeting, organelle function, organelle structure and organelle biosynthesis, protein sorting, motility, and cell-to-cell interactions. Lectures will also introduce the topics of signal transduction and cellular functions that are required for cell growth and programmed cell death, as well as how perturbations in these processes can result in human diseases. This course is a combined lecture and lab class. The laboratory portion will complement lecture topics and include the application of fundamental techniques used in cell biology such as sub-cellular fractionation, protein isolation, detection and activity. 92 contact hours.

PCB 3043C   ECOLOGY WITH LAB

credits: 4  

Prerequisites: BSC 2010/2010L and BSC 2011/2011L. This course is designed to teach ecology at four major levels: organismic, population, community and ecosystem. One of the aims is to interrelate the different levels of ecological study and to unify these via evolutionary and behavioral ecology. A second aim is to correlate the concepts of ecology with those learned in physiology to understand physiological ecology. This course will address both theoretical and empirical ecology as well as applied ecology with special emphasis on Florida’s ecosystems and human impacts on them. This course is a combined lecture and lab class. 92 contact hours.

PCB 3063C   GENETICS WITH LAB

credits: 4  

Prerequisites: BSC 2010/2010L, BSC 2011/2011L and CHM 2045/2045L. Pre or corequisite: CHM 2046/2046L. This course is designed to teach three major areas of genetics: the organization and transmission of genetic material, the molecular biology of gene expression and regulation, and the modification and evolution of genes and genomes. This course also provides an understanding of the history and process of genetics as an experimental science and to provide the student with a foundation for understanding the current advances and rapid changes in genetic engineering and genomics. This course is a combined lecture and lab class. 92 contact hours.

PCB 4233   IMMUNOLOGY

credits: 3  

Prerequisite(s): BSC 2010/2010L, and MCB 3020C or PCB 3023C. This course teaches the fundamentals and functions of the immune system. The role of the immune system in health and disease is a vital component of life and investigations into this system introduce the student to the organs, tissues, cells, and molecules of the immune system and their relationship to disease. The immune system involves complex interactions between blood cells, chemical signals, cellular signals, genetics, and foreign “invaders” which allow us to merge concepts from biology, microbiology, biochemistry and genetics. 47 contact hours.

PCB 4253C   DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY WITH LAB

credits: 4  

Prerequisite(s): BSC 2010/2010L, BSC 2011/2011L, CHM 2045/2045L, CHM 2046/2046L, and PCB 3063C; PCB 3023C is recommended. Each course requires a grade of C or better. This course focuses on the molecular mechanisms underlying patterns of embryonic development. Emphasis will be based on the experimental approaches taken to understand development using cellular and molecular mechanisms rather than descriptive embryology. Course content will cover fertilization, axis formation, cell specification, germ layer formation, differential gene expression and organogenesis. In addition current topics should be discussed, including by not limited to: development and disease, aging and regeneration, stem cell biology as well as environmental and evolutionary developmental mechanisms. Developmental biology is interdisciplinary, incorporating all aspects of the biological sciences and can be thought of as a capstone course in undergraduate education. This course is a combined lecture and lab class. The lab component helps students to understand the scientific process and to develop skills in observation, description, data analysis, basic statistics, literature review and evaluation, and writing. 92 contact hours.

PCB 4363C   PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY

credits: 4  

Prerequisite(s): BSC 2011/2011L and PCB 3043C. The aim of physiological ecology is to understand physiological systems in the context of evolution and ecology. Physiological ecology considers questions such as "how does an organism's physiology enable or constrain its ecology?" and "via what mechanisms do physiological adaptations affect the evolutionary fitness of organisms?" This course will examine how physiological systems that span levels from molecules to cells to whole organisms interact with exogenous factors such as evolution, ecology, and the environment. In addition, this course will investigate the biomechanical and evolutionary limits of these physiological systems. This course is a combined lecture and lab class. 92 contact hours.

PCB 4454C   BIOSTATISTICS WITH LAB

credits: 4  

Prerequisite(s): STA 2023 or MAC 2234, or permission of the instructor. This course is designed to provide the use of statistics in the analysis of biological data. Quality statistical analyses begin with quality data, so early topics cover the collection and processing of data as well as the calculation of descriptive summary statistics. Subsequent lectures will focus on the linkage between statistical analyses and the scientific method, especially in terms of developing and testing appropriate hypotheses. The remainder of the course involves a discussion of various routine techniques used to analyze biological data, including t-tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and linear regression. This course is a combined lecture and lab class, and the lab component involves hands-on analyses of real-world biological data using common statistical analysis software. At the completion of the course students will have sufficient understanding of basic statistical techniques to analyze data from their own undergraduate research studies. 92 contact hours.

PCB 4674   EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: BSC 2010/2010L and BSC 2011/2011L and PCB 3043C. This lecture course is designed to teach both the mechanisms of adaptation and the resulting traits that arise. The course will emphasize the environmental (both biotic and abiotic) pressures that drive adaptation and will investigate the morphological, physiological, behavioral and demographic adaptations resulting from specific environmental pressures. 47 contact hours.

PCB 4723C   COMPARATIVE ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY WITH LAB

credits: 4  

Prerequisites: BSC 2010/2010L, BSC 2011/2011L, CHM 2045/2045L, CHM 2046/2046L, BCH 3023 or BCH 4024. This course is designed to teach animal physiology from a comparative perspective that focuses on the interplay between environmental conditions and physiological adaptation and highlights the many similarities and differences seen among different types of organisms. It also stresses the significance of homeostasis and addresses the interdependency between structure and function. This course emphasizes an interdisciplinary approach in which concepts from physics and chemistry are merged with concepts from biology and is a combined lecture and lab class. 92 contact hours.

PEL 2342   TENNIS

credits: 1  
This course offers tennis skill practice. Emphasis is on strategy. Singles or doubles tourney play. This course can be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits. 32 contact hours.

PEM 1102   BASIC CONDITIONING

credits: 1  
This course is an instruction in principles of weight training and aerobic exercise. The emphasis is on muscular strength development and cardiovascular endurance. The course can be taken twice for credit. 32 contact hours.

PEM 1171   AEROBIC DANCE

credits: 1  
This course is a fitness activity that combines principles of dance, calisthenics and aerobics. This program is based on the principle of continuous movement. This course may be repeated for a total of 6 credits. 32 contact hours.

PEM 1177   PILATES PLUS

credits: 1  

This course covers three modalities of wellness: Pilates, kickboxing and resistance work. The main concentration will be on Pilates. The Pilates method emphasizes the core, building the abs, the lower back and buttocks to enhance muscle balance. Pilates improves coordination, joint mobility, balance, alignment and poor postural habits. The fitness principles of muscular strength, endurance, flexibility, cardiovascular endurance and body composition will be emphasized in each of these modalities. Additional assessment and management of nutritional habits will be emphasized. Each technique will be illustrated by the instructor at various levels of competency, i.e., beginners, intermediate and advanced. Music will be used to accompany the choreography of each modality as well as other fitness props. This course may be repeated for a total of 5 credits. 17 contact hours.

PEM 2131   WEIGHT TRAINING

credits: 2  

This course is an overview of the basic principles of weight training and conditioning. The primary emphasis is to increase skeletal muscular development. Cardiovascular endurance and general fitness improvement is also involved. The course may be repeated 3 times for a total of 6 credits. 47 contact hours.

PEM 2145   JOGGING AND DISTANCE WALKING

credits: 1  
This course is the study and practice of walking, jogging, running and its effects on body systems. Emphasis is on cardiopulmonary training; secondary emphasis is on general fitness. 32 contact hours.

PEN 2136   SKIN AND SCUBA DIVING

credits: 2  

This is a physical education course designed to teach the techniques of safe skin and SCUBA diving. Successful completion of this course qualifies students for nationally recognized certification. Physical examination, liability release and special equipment fee are required. 64 contact hours.

PEN 2137   ADVANCED SCUBA DIVING

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: PEN 2136 or previous certification in a nationally recognized scuba certification program. This course is designed to enable students to practice advanced scuba techniques suitable for various open water diving experiences. 64 contact hours in eight weeks.

PET 2622   SPORTS MEDICINE/ATHLETIC TRAINING

credits: 3  
This course covers the prevention, detection, correction and rehabilitation of sports and athletic injuries will be covered. Practical rehabilitation will be under the supervision of a certified athletic trainer. 47 contact hours.

PGY 1279   LEGAL ISSUES IN PHOTOGRAPHY

credits: 3  

This course is intended to provide a comprehensive overview of basic legal concepts and laws a professional in the photography business should master, including those concerning intellectual property, agency, employment and contracts, to better prepare and protect the professional. Topics covered include the creation and protection of intellectual property, the meaning of agency relationships and employment relationships in various settings, as well as contract formation and defenses as each pertain to those in the photographic industry. 47 contact hours.

PGY 2000   HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY

credits: 3  
A course in which the student will research and explore early photographic processes, various trends, and their applications. The student will examine the technological evolution on photography and the impact of this progressive visual medium on the growth, culture, and communication in the world today. The emphasis will be on the inventors, entrepreneurs, artists, and the network they formed which provided the foundation on which the visual syntax in all art changed and expanded expression throughout the 20th Century. 47 contact hours.

PGY 2107C   LARGE FORMAT PHOTOGRAHY

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: PGY 2201C. This course is designed to enable students to evolve individually and as a group toward the understanding and creative utilization of visual technology. The program takes an interdisciplinary approach to experimental application of new technologies associated with photography and its impact on the culture, visual expression, and communications in the world today. Students will examine visual perspective by the ability to control the photographic image through the use of large format camera equipment. Students will examine the inherent optical distortion associated with human perception and camera lenses. Students will explore the various methods of correcting for optical distortions. Students will study the advantages of large format photography compared to conventional smaller cameras. The students will learn the diversity of controls and techniques which accompany larger formats. The emphasis will be a “hands-on” approach working with other students in an equipped photographic studio and laboratory designed to provide an environment for creative activity which reflects the inherent flexibility of medium and large format photography and how this application has expanded the visual syntax in all forms of expression. Course may be taken up to 3 times for credit. 92 contact hours.

PGY 2110C   COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: PGY 2404C or portfolio review by instructor. Color photography includes the study of various color films, lighting, correction filters, processing and presentation of various types of color film and paper. 92 contact hours.

PGY 2201C   PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIO LIGHTING

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: PGY 2401C and PGY 2110C. This is a course in which students will research and explore various lighting techniques used in photography to enhance the composition of the subject matter. Students will examine technical aspects involved in working with lighting equipment and the impact this visual application is having on the growth, culture, and communication in the world today. The emphasis will be a "hands on" approach working with other students, models and potential clients in single and group portraiture situations. Students will become better acquainted with lighting used in product, advertising, and specialty photography which has expanded the visual syntax in all visual forms of expression and communication throughout humanity. Course may be taken up to three times for credit. 92 contact hours.

PGY 2210C   PROFESSIONAL STUDIO PORTRAITURE

credits: 4  

Prerequisite: PGY 2401C and PGY 2800C. This is a course for students to explore on both an individual and group basis the utilization of photographic lighting equipment and techniques for portrait photography. The emphasis will be a “hands on” approach working with other students, models and potential clients in portrait situations. Students will develop basic lighting skills and practice in the production of studio portraits. Students will examine various methods of photographing individuals and groups of people in a studio environment and how photographic styles have expanded the visual syntax in all visual forms of expression and communication in cultures throughout the world. Course may be taken up to three times for credit. 92 contact hours.

PGY 2401C   PHOTOGRAPHY I

credits: 3  

This course presents the fundamentals of black and white photography, as well as digital imaging. The course includes the study of camera operation, exposure control, film processing, printing the positive, print finishing, and presentation. Students will examine digital imaging through the use of digital cameras and the conversion of conventional photography to electronic images. Through weekly assignments, emphasis is placed on photography's use as a medium of personal expression. Course may be taken up to three times for credit. 92 contact hours.

PGY 2404C   INTERMEDIATE PHOTOGRAPHY

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: PGY 2401C. In this course, the student deals with advanced problems in refinement of the silver print and the development of visual acuity, perception, and aesthetic sensibilities, as well as with advanced technical problems. Advanced problems include controlling various manipulative techniques obtainable through the camera and in the darkroom such as multiple exposures, multiple negatives, negative blends, orthochromatic processes, infrared film, etc. Additional emphasis is placed on photography's application to other fields including journalism, business, and industry. Course may be taken up to three times for credit. 92 contact hours.

PGY 2446C   ALTERNATIVE PROCESSES/PHOTOGRAPHY

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: PGY 2401C. This course is designed to enable students to evolve individually and as a group toward the utilization of historical photographic processes fused into new technologies. The program takes an interdisciplinary approach to experimental applications of old photographic technologies and examines the integration of computer technology into these processes and its impact on the culture, visual expression, and communications in the world today. Students will examine early non-silver photographic processes, such as Kalotypes, Cyanotypes, and Gum Bicromates and incorporate these processes with computer materials and techniques. Students will explore how the integration of these diverse applications can allow for greater and new creative discoveries in their approach to both photographic and computer related technologies. The emphasis will be a “hands-on” approach working with other students in an equipped photographic and electronic laboratory designed to provide an environment for creative activity which reflects the inherent flexibility of conventional and computer technologies and how this medium has expanded the visual syntax in all forms of expression. 92 contact hours.

PGY 2470C   THEMES FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: PGY 2401C and PGY 2404C. This course is designed for students who already have acquired basic technical knowledge of photography. This individualized course provides students the opportunity to explore and develop their own thematic approach to communicating through photography. Course may be taken up to three times for credit. 92 contact hours.

PGY 2475C   PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: PGY 2404C. This course is designed for students to evolve on an individual and group basis toward the creative utilization of technology for enhancement of presentation of student portfolio work. The program takes an interdisciplinary approach to the documentation of student portfolios through the application of conventional and new photographic technologies and its impact on the culture, visual expression and communications in the world today. Students will examine various technologies of documenting their edited images and assembling their work utilizing a diversified means of professional presentational methods. Students will explore presentational technologies best suited for their specific target market for employment. The emphasis will be a “hands on” approach working with other students in an equipped photographic and electronic laboratory designed to provide an environment for creative activity which reflects the inherent flexibility of conventional and new technologies and how this medium has expanded the visual syntax in all form of expression. Course may be taken up to three times for credit. 92 contact hours.

PGY 2800C   DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: PGY 2401C. This course is designed for students to evolve on an individual and group basis toward the creative utilization of technology. The program takes an interdisciplinary approach to experimental application of new technologies associated with photography and its impact on the culture, visual expression and communications in the world today. Students will examine digital imaging through the use of digital cameras and how conventional photographs can be converted to electronic images by various scanning methods. Students will explore how the electronic image can be printed using traditional processes and the advantages of both electronic and conventional methods. The emphasis will be a hands-on approach working with other students in an equipped photographic and electronic laboratory designed to provide an environment for creative activity which reflects the inherent flexibility of digital and conventional technologies and how this medium has expanded the visual syntax in all forms of expression. 92 contact hours.

PGY 2940C   PROFESSIONAL PRACTICES/INTERNSHIP

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: PGY 2404C. This course is designed to enable students to evolve individually and as a group toward the utilization of photographic technology. The program takes an interdisciplinary approach to experimental application of new technologies associated with photography and its impact on the culture, visual expression and communications in the world today. Students will utilize photographic skills and techniques acquired in the classroom and apply these applications in a pre-determined business or company. Students will explore their photographic discipline in an on-site training program/internship for knowledge and experience. The emphasis will be a “hands-on” approach working with other students in an equipped photographic and electronic laboratory and on-location incorporating academic discussions and practices with job related experience. The program is designed to provide an environment for creative activity which reflects the inherent flexibility of the traditional and new technologies and how this medium has expanded the visual syntax in all forms of expression. 92 contact hours.

PHH 1603   20TH CENTURY TRENDS IN PHILOSOPHY

credits: 3  
This course surveys contemporary trends in philosophy, including such schools of thought as Pragmatism, Critical Realism, New Realism, Analytic Philosophy, Logical Positivism, Existentialism, Phenomenology, and Philosophical Hermeneutics. Dominant emphasis is on the special features of 20th Century thought, such as the move from anti metaphysical perspectives at the beginning of the century to a new way of addressing these traditional issues at the end. This course has a substantial writing requirement. 47 contact hours.

PHH 2101   INTRODUCTION TO ANCIENT GREEK PHILOSOPHY

credits: 3  

Prerequisite(s): ENC 0025 or EAP 1695 or satisfactory score on the SPC placement test. This introductory survey of classical Greek Philosophy provides a rich evaluation of ancient schools of thought and their connection to Western culture. A historical and critical examination is conducted of these schools of thought addressing the issues in metaphysics, epistemology and axiology (ethics, aesthetics, and theology.) Discussion as well as lecture will focus on historically and philosophically important philosophers, including Thales, Pythagoras, Heraclitus, Parmenides and other Pre-Socratic philosophers, as well as Plato and Aristotle. 47 contact hours.

PHI 1010   INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY

credits: 3  

"G" Prerequisite: ENC 0025 or EAP 1695 or satisfactory score on the SPC placement test. This introductory survey of the perennial issues in human existence provides a rich evaluation of life's meaning. A critical examination is conducted of the fundamental assumptions, terminology, and schools of thought addressing the issues in metaphysics, epistemology and axiology (ethics, aesthetics, and theology.) Discussion as well as lecture will focus on both classical and contemporary philosophers, such as Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, Sartre, and de Beauvoir. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. Credit is not given for both PHI 1010 and PHI 1010H. 47 contact hours.

PHI 1010H   HONORS INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY

credits: 3  
"G" Prerequisite: Appropriate score on the SPC placement test or acceptance into the Honors College or approval of the program director. This course will cover the history of philosophy, its philosophers, key ideas, as well as the perennial issues in human existence that provide a rich evaluation of life's meaning. A critical examination will be conducted into the fundamental assumptions, terminology, and schools of thought in philosophy, addressing a variety of issues in metaphysics, epistemology and axiology (ethics and aesthetics). Discussion as well as lecture will focus on both classical and contemporary readings, such as the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, Wollstonecraft, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, Wittgenstein, Russell, Heidegger, Sartre, de Beauvoir. Special emphasis will be given to theoretical traditions of Western thought such as idealism, materialism, rationalism, and existentialism, as well as Post-Modern and non-Western theoretical positions. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. Credit is not given for both PHI 1010H and PHI 1010. 47 contact hours.

PHI 1600   STUDIES IN APPLIED ETHICS

credits: 3  

"G" Prerequisites: (REA 0002 or REA 0017) and (ENC 0020 or ENC 0025) or EAP 1695 or appropriate score on the SPC placement exam. This course is a practical overview of key issues, questions and concepts in applied ethics. Special emphases are placed on the historical development of ethical thinking, a variety of ethical approaches and on multicultural aspects of ethics. Students will also examine a variety of personal, social, and professional ethical issues and problems and learn methods of resolving them through the use of critical thinking skills, sound ethical reasoning and legal and professional codes. Students are provided an active learning experience, increased student interaction and opportunities for independent research into ethical issues of personal interest. This course has a substantial writing requirement. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements . Credit is not given for both PHI 1600 and any of the following courses: PHI 1602H, PHI 1603, PHI 1631, PHI 2621, PHI 2622, PHI 2635 or PHI 2649. 47 contact hours.

PHI 1602H   HONORS STUDIES IN APPLIED ETHICS

credits: 3  
"G" Prerequisite: (Appropriate score on SPC placement test) or (acceptance into the Honors College) or approval of the program director. This course is designed to provide the academically gifted student an analytical approach to understanding and resolving ethical issues confronting an individual in today's society. Emphasis is placed on understanding the historical development of ethical thinking, critical analysis of of a wide variety of ethical theories representative of major themes of ethical philosophy, ethical issues, and evaluation of multicultural and historical aspects of ethics. Students will also use logical reasoning, critical thinking skills, and resources such as legal and professional codes to evaluate differing points of view on a wide variety of ethical issues, and to synthesize personal opinions. The seminar format encourages individual and collaborative effort, independent research, and verbalization of concepts. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. Credit is not given for both PHI 1602H and any of the following courses: PHI 1600, PHI 1603, PHI 1631, PHI 2621, PHI 2622, PHI 2635, or PHI 2649. 47 contact hours.

PHI 2103   CRITICAL THINKING AND ETHICAL DECISION MAKING

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: PHI 1600, PHI 1602H, PHI 1603, PHI 1631, PHI 2635, or PHI 2649. This course introduces students to critical thinking tools and techniques, and provides students with the practical skills needed to analyze and assess situations in order to resolve complex problems and make responsible and ethical decisions. 47 contact hours.

PHI 2621   APPLIED ETHICS II

credits: 1  
"G" Prerequisite: PHI 1603. This course is designed to meet the needs of the student who has initially completed Applied Ethics (2 credits) but needs Studies in Applied Ethics (3 credits). This course is a practical approach to recognizing, understanding and solving ethical problems confronting individuals in today’s society. Students will learn concepts in applied ethics and selected ethical theories, which represents additional main themes in moral philosophy. Emphasis will be placed on the development of skills necessary for critical thinking and responsible decision making. Credit will not be given for both PHI 2621 and any of the following courses: PHI 1600, PHI 1602H, PHI 1631, PHI 2622, PHI 2635, or PHI 2649. 17 contact hours.

PHI 2622   PROFESSIONAL APPLIED ETHICS

credits: 1  
"G" Prerequisite: PHI 1603. This course is designed to meet the needs of the student who has initially completed Applied Ethics (2 credits) but needs Studies in Professional Ethics (3 credits). This course is a practical approach to recognizing, understanding and solving ethical problems confronting individuals in today's society, with particular emphasis on business. Students will learn concepts in applied ethics and selected ethical theories which represent additional main themes in moral philosophy. Emphasis will be placed on the development of skills necessary for critical thinking and responsible decision making in business. Credit will not be given for both PHI 2622 and any of the following courses: PHI 1600, PHI 1602H, PHI 1631, PHI 2621, PHI 2635, or PHI 2649. 17 contact hours.

PHI 2623   ETHICS FOR EDUCATORS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: BA or BS Degree or permission of Program Director. This course is designed to meet the needs of current K-12 educators who teach or will be teaching in the State of Florida, but need an approved Ethics course to be certified or recertified to teach. This course is a practical approach to recognizing, understanding and solving ethical problems confronting educators in today's society. Students will learn concepts in applied ethics and selected ethical theories, which represent main themes in moral philosophy. Students will learn current Principles of Professional Conduct, Board of Education rules and relevant Florida Statutes, and will learn the use of said codes, rules and laws in resolving ethical issues. Emphasis will be placed on the development of skills necessary for critical thinking and responsible decision making in the educational arena. 45 contact hours.

PHI 2624   ETHICS IN POPULAR CULTURE AND ENTERTAINMENT

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: PHI 1600, PHI 1602H, PHI 1631, PHI 2635, or PHI 2649 or permission of program director. This course is a study of the fundamental concepts of classical and modern approaches to moral reasoning as identified in various forms of popular culture and entertainment. A review of fundamental ethical definitions and concepts, elements of critical thinking and logic, and classical and contemporary approaches to moral reasoning will precede the examination and analysis of selected forms of popular culture and entertainment. The analysis phase will consist of an examination of the selected materials with a view to identifying the presence of issues and dilemmas of moral significance. Fictional and historical characters will then be assessed as to their critical thinking processes and their approaches to the resolution of moral dilemmas. 47 contact hours.

PHI 2630   DISCOVERING YOUR PERSONAL ETHICS

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: PHI 1600, PHI 1602H, PHI 1631, PHI 2635 or PHI 2649 or permission of program director. This course explores possible answers to the ancient, yet still relevant, question, "What is a good life?" Major ethical principles from philosophers throughout history are evaluated, and then exemplified in the lives, achievements, and words of important historical figures representing a variety of disciplines, cultures, nations, and religions. Conducted in a seminar format, the course emphasizes the roles of reason, critical thought, self-analysis and personal application in the development of a morally mature life. 32 contact hours.

PHI 2646   ETHICS IN FABLES AND STORIES

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: PHI 1600 or PHI 1602H or PHI 1631 or PHI 2635 or PHI 2649. This course is a study of the fundamental concepts of classical and contemporary approaches to ethical reasoning as identified in various forms of fables and classical stories. The analysis will consist of an examination of the selected materials with a view to identifying the presence of issues and dilemmas of ethical significance. Fictional and historical characters’ approaches to the resolutions of moral dilemmas will be assessed. Fables and stories will be evaluated to make meaningful and useful connections to contemporary dilemmas and decisions. 47 contact hours.

PHI 2694   THE ETHICS OF DEATH AND DYING

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: PHI 1600, PHI 1602H, PHI 1631, PHI 2635, or PHI 2649 or permission of program director. This course is a practical overview of key concepts and issues involving the ethics of death and dying and end of life decisions. Special emphases are placed on the historical development of ethical and critical thinking about claims, arguments, choices, and multicultural aspects of death and dying, and the application of ethical approaches to a wide range of end of life issues. Moral and legal ramifications of end of life decisions are examined. In this seminar-format course, students are provided an active learning experience, increased student interaction and opportunities for independent research into death and dying issues as these relate on a personal and, if applicable, a professional level. Credit will not be given for PHI 2550 in place of any of the following courses: PHI 1600, PHI 1602H, PHI 1603, PHI 1631, PHI 2621, PHI 2622, PHI 2635 or PHI 2649. 47 contact hours.

PHI 2921L   ETHICS BOWL LABORATORY

credits: 1  
Prerequisite: PHI 1600, PHI 1602H, PHI 1631, PHI 2635, or PHI 2649 or permission of program director. This course offers training and experience in analyzing ethical case studies and prepares students to compete in intercollegiate ethics bowl competitions. It provides students the opportunity to improve critical thinking, public speaking and debating skills in order to succeed at intercollegiate ethics competitions. This course may be taken 4 times for credit. 45 contact hours.

PHI 2950   ETHICS DEBATE TEAM

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: PHI 1600, PHI 1602H, PHI 1631, PHI 2635, or PHI 2649 or permission of Program Chair or Dean. This course offers training and experience in analyzing ethical case studies and prepares students to compete in intercollegiate ethics debate competitions. It provides students the opportunity to improve critical thinking, public speaking, debating, and research skills which will enhance many aspects of the student’s life, including success in ethics debate competitions. 47 contact hours.

PHT 1121   FUNCTIONAL ANATOMY AND KINESIOLOGY

credits: 3  
Prerequisites: BSC 2085/2085L with grades of "C" or higher. Corequisite: PHT 1121L. This course will be devoted to the study of the structure and function of the musculoskeletal system with emphasis on the mechanical (functional) aspects of human motion and the application of kinesiology as related to therapeutic exercise. 47 contact hours.

PHT 1121L   FUNCTIONAL ANATOMY AND KINESIOLOGY LABORATORY

credits: 2  
Prerequisites: BSC 2085/2085L with grades of "C" or higher. Corequisite: PHT 1121. Within a laboratory environment, this course will be devoted to the study of the structure and function of the musculoskeletal system with emphasis on the mechanical (functional) aspects of human motion and the application of kinesiology as related to therapeutic exercise. Observational, manual dexterity, and communication skills will be developed relevant to analyzing, demonstrating, monitoring and/or modifying therapeutic exercise/routines. 62 contact hours.

PHT 1200   INTRODUCTION TO BASIC PATIENT CARE

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: Admission to the Physical Therapist Assistant AS program and completion of ENC 1101, HSC 1531 and the Computer Literacy Competency Requirement. Corequisite: PHT 1200L. This course is an introduction to the field of physical therapy including role orientation, professional organizational structure, modality principles used for basic patient care and disease processes. Role orientation, ethics, legal aspects, limitation and relationships will be explored relative to the physician, registered physical therapist and the patient. 47 contact hours.

PHT 1200L   BASIC PATIENT CARE LABORATORY

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: Admission to the Physical Therapist Assistant AS program and completion of ENC 1101, HSC 1531 and the Computer Literacy Competency Requirement. Corequisite: PHT 1200. This is a laboratory course in which there is practice in activities and modalities basic to the care of patients in health agencies. The development of manual dexterity with patient safety and comforts is the focus. The college laboratory will be utilized for practice demonstration. 92 contact hours.

PHT 1217   PHYSICAL THERAPY PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: PHT 1200, PHT 1200L, PHT 1121, PHT 1121L with grades of “C” or better, PHI 2635 or approved Ethics course, BSC 2086 and BSC 2086L. Corequisite: PHT 1217L. This is a course to introduce the principles of physical therapy (PT) treatment procedures and modalities used in patient care. Specialized vocabulary and selected medical-surgical conditions are presented. 47 contact hours.

PHT 1217L   PHYSICAL THERAPY PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES LABORATORY

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: PHT 1200, PHT 1200L, PHT 1121 and PHT 1121L with grades of “C” or higher, and PHI 2635 or approved Ethics course and BSC 2086/2086L. Corequisite: PHT 1217. Basic skills are to be developed and principles applied involving functional anatomy and kinesiology, basic therapeutic exercise, and application of modalities relative to caring for the patient. Demonstrations, student practice in college laboratory and in affiliated health agencies constitute course activities. 92 contact hours.

PHT 1801L   PHYSICAL THERAPY CLINICAL PRACTICE I

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: PHT 1217, PHT 1217L, PHT 2252, PHT 2252L with grades of “C” or higher, PSY 1012, HSC 1149C, and HUM 2270 or Honors or REL 2300. This course allows the student to correlate didactic course work with basic patient care skills in the clinical setting utilizing information learned in the first year of the physical therapist assistant program. Each student is assigned to a clinical agency and performs specific physical therapy modalities and procedures on a variety of patients under the close supervision of a physical therapist. 40 contact hours per week for four (4) weeks and 20 contact hours in the fifth week.

PHT 2162   NEUROLOGICAL DISABILITIES AND TREATMENT

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: PHT 1801L with a grade of "C" or higher. This course is devoted to the advanced study of the nervous system and selected neurological disabilities encountered in physical therapy practice. Emphasis is on the etiology, pathology and clinical picture of diseases studied. Use of physical therapy modalities and procedures most effective for each neurological condition is discussed. 47 contact hours.

PHT 2220   THERAPEUTIC EXERCISE IN PHYSICAL THERAPY

credits: 2  

Prerequisite: PHT 1801L with a grade of "C" or better. Corequisite: PHT 2220L. This course provides an overview of the neurophysiological and cardiovascular basis for application of therapeutic exercise. The rationale for and functional basis of therapeutic exercise is correlated with selected patient pathologies. 32 contact hours.

PHT 2220L   THERAPEUTIC EXERCISE IN PHYSICAL THERAPY LABORATORY

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: PHT 1801L with a grade of "C" or higher. Corequisite: PHT 2220. Within the laboratory environment, this course will be devoted to the study and performance of power-assisted exercise modes and cardiovascular-based and neurophysiologically-based therapeutic exercise programs. Practice in the laboratory will involve demonstration, observation, analysis and performance monitoring. 64 contact hours.

PHT 2252   ORTHOPEDIC DISABILITIES AND TREATMENT

credits: 3  
Prerequisites: PHT 1121/1121L and PHT 1200/1200L with grades of "C" or higher. Pre- or corequisites: PHT 1217/1217L with grades of "C" or higher. Corequisite: PHT 2252L. This course provides the opportunity to develop basic skills in data collection and more advanced skills in therapeutic exercise techniques for common orthopedic conditions. a basic knowledge of selected orthopedic disabilities encountered in physical therapy practice. Emphasis is on the etiology, pathology and clinical picture of diseases studied. Use of physical therapy modalities and procedures used in each disability is discussed. 47 contact hours.

PHT 2252L   ORTHOPEDIC DISABILITIES AND TREATMENT LABORATORY

credits: 2  

Corequisite: PHT 2252. Prerequisite: PHT 1217/PHT 1217L with grades of “C” or higher or Corequisite: PHT 1217/PHT 1217L. This course provides the opportunity to develop basic skills in data collection and more advanced skills in therapeutic exercise techniques for common orthopedic conditions. Exercise programs for specific orthopedic pathologies are presented and practiced. 62 contact hours.

PHT 2810L   PHYSICAL THERAPY CLINICAL PRACTICE II

credits: 4  

Prerequisite: PHT 2220, PHT 2220L, and PHT 2162 with grades of “C” or better, SPC 1017, college level mathematics, and DEP 2004. This clinical and laboratory course is correlated with class material. It provides the student with selected experiences in the college laboratory and health care agency. Emphasis is placed on more complex therapeutic procedures in clinical practice. Problem-solving techniques are employed in clinical decision-making. 40 clinical hours per week for four (4) weeks and 20 hours in the college laboratory. 180 contact hours.

PHT 2820L   PHYSICAL THERAPY CLINICAL PRACTICE III

credits: 4  

Prerequisites or Corequisites: PHT 2810L and PHT 2931 with grades of "C" or higher. This clinical course provides the student with selected experiences in a healthcare agency under the direct supervision of a physical therapist/physical therapist assistant. Emphasis is placed on complex/advanced therapeutic procedures in clinical practice. Advanced problem-solving techniques are employed in clinical decision-making. 180 contact hours.

PHT 2931   TRENDS IN PHYSICAL THERAPY

credits: 2  

Prerequisites: PHT 2220, PHT 2220L, PHT 2252, PHT2252L, PHT 2162. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: PHT 2810L, with grades of “C” or higher. This course is a seminar-type class which will explore the newer trends involving the role of the professional team, the professional organization, legal and ethical implications and legislation (including state regulations as well as Medicare and Medicaid regulations). Historical patterns in the development of the profession of physical therapy and projections of future directions in light of influence from the past will be explored. 32 contact hours.

PHY 1048L   PHYSICS LABORATORY I

credits: 1  
Corequisite: PHY 1053 or PHY 2048. This course is to provide laboratory experience with concepts and principles of mechanics, heat and sound. This course has a substantial writing requirement. Credit is not given for both PHY 1048L and PHY 1048LH. 45 contact hours.

PHY 1048LH   HONORS PHYSICS LABORATORY I

credits: 1  
Prerequisite: Appropriate score on the SPC placement test or acceptance into the Honors College or approval of science program director. Corequisite: PHY 2048H. This course is to provide laboratory experiences with the concepts and principles of mechanics, heat and sound. This lab will employ short interactive explorations and presentations that are followed by intense discussions leading to more explorations and discussions. The explorations will include hands on experiments with laboratory equipment as well as interactive computer animations. This instructional method will put more of the responsibility of the learning process on the students who will be working in collaborative learning communities. It will also create a learning environment that is conducive to deeper conceptual understanding. This course has a substantial writing requirement. Credit is not given for both PHY 1048LH and PHY 1048L. 45 contact hours.

PHY 1049L   PHYSICS LABORATORY II

credits: 1  
Prerequisite: PHY 1048L. Corequisite: PHY 1054 or PHY 2049. A continuation of Physics Laboratory I, this course provides laboratory experiences in concepts and principles of electricity, magnetism, and light. This course has a substantial writing requirement. 45 contact hours.

PHY 1053   GENERAL PHYSICS I

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017) or EAP 1695 and either MAC 1114 or MAC 1147. Corequisite: PHY 1048L. Subject matter includes mechanics, heat, and sound. This is a course for students not majoring in the physical sciences. (Credit is not given for both PHY 1053 and PHY 2048.) 47 contact hours.

PHY 1054   GENERAL PHYSICS II

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: PHY 1053. Corequisite: PHY 1049L. Subject matter includes electricity, magnetism, light, and some modern physics. This is a course for students not majoring in the physical sciences. (Credit is not given for both PHY 1054 and PHY 2049.) 47 contact hours.

PHY 2048   PHYSICS I

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017 and MAC 2311) or (EAP 1695 and MAC 2311). Co-requisite: PHY 1048L. This course includes theory of Newtonian mechanics: vectors; force; motion; energy; and rotation of rigid bodies. It also includes theory of heat; sound and wave motion; and use of Calculus in problem solving. This course is designed for physics majors and for engineering students. Credit is not given for both PHY 2048 and PHY 2048H. 47 contact hours.

PHY 2048H   HONORS PHYSICS I

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: (MAC 2311 or MAC 2311H) or (acceptance into the Honors College) or approval of the Science Program Director. Corequisite: PHY 1048LH. This course includes theory of mechanics: vectors; force; motion; energy; rotation of rigid bodies; elastic properties; vibratory motion, properties of fluids; molecular theory of matter. It also includes theory of heat; heat transfer; thermodynamics; sound and wave motion phenomena; use of Calculus in problem solving. This course will employ interactive learning and research projects beyond the typical Physics course. The research projects will include a term paper in Special Relativity, Quantum Mechanics, or Renewable Energy. The interactive learning will include the use of computer animations with physics content demonstrating their understanding without as much guidance by using interactive techniques, critical thinking, and conceptual understanding to solve problems. In this course students will learn the underlying concepts that give them a much deeper understanding of the material. This course is designed for physics majors and for engineering students. Credit is not given for both PHY 2048H and PHY 2048. 47 contact hours.

PHY 2049   PHYSICS II

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: PHY 2048 and (MAC 2312 or MAC 2234). Corequisite: PHY 1049L. This course is the study of theory of electricity and magnetism, nature of light, electromagnetic radiation, optics, and selected topics in modern physics. Calculus will be used in problem solving. This course is intended for physics majors and engineering students. 47 contact hours.

PLA 1003   INTRODUCTION TO PARALEGALISM

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017) or EAP 1695 or a satisfactory score on the SPC Writing and Reading placement tests. This course is designed to provide a general perspective of the legal system and a specific knowledge of the present and potential role of the legal paraprofessional within that system. Students will be exposed to the operations and structure of the court system, administrative agencies, private law firms and public sector law offices. Students will examine legal ethics in evaluating what tasks, skills and roles are now and may in the future be fulfilled by the legal paraprofessional in each legal area. Students will be introduced to paralegal skills such as interviewing, investigating, legal writing and research. Opportunities will be available for students to begin voluntary service with law-related agencies or to add to their occupational skills. 47 contact hours.

PLA 1104   LEGAL RESEARCH & WRITING

credits: 3  
Pre- or corequisites: PLA 1003 and (ENC 1101 or ENC 1121H or IDS 1101H). This course will provide the student with a working knowledge of the major techniques of legal research and writing. It will introduce the student to a broad practical approach to the use of legal publications and the law library. The student will complete assigned problems in legal research and will draft legal memoranda and briefs for both trial and appellate work. 47 contact hours.

PLA 1361   TECHNIQUES OF INTERVIEW AND INVESTIGATION

credits: 3  
Pre- or corequisite: PLA 1003. This course is designed to enhance communication skills and acquaint the student with the techniques of skillful investigation. Students will receive training in methods of interviewing. Fact analysis, sources of evidence and special investigative problems will be explored. Emphasis is placed in human relations skills in working with people. 47 contact hours.

PLA 1730   COMPUTERIZED LEGAL RESEARCH

credits: 1  
Prerequisite: PLA 1104. This course is designed to familiarize the student with computerized legal research databases and enhance previously learned research skills. 16 contact hours.

PLA 1763   LAW OFFICE MANAGEMENT

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: ENC 1101 or ENC 1121H or IDS 1101H. This course analyzes the fundamental objectives of the management of a law office, the essential technology used in a law office, management concepts, and essential communication skills. Additional study will be focused upon the organization of private, corporate and government legal departments. Major attention will be upon administrative systems and procedures; time keeping and accounting practices; compensation and profit distribution. 47 contact hours.

PLA 2114   ADVANCED LEGAL RESEARCH

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: PLA 1104. This course is designed to perfect the research skills acquired in PLA 1104. Emphasis is placed on developing facility in state and federal research and the drafting of memoranda and briefs. 47 contact hours.

PLA 2203   CIVIL LITIGATION I

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: PLA 1003. This course is designed to prepare the legal assistant to assist the trial attorney in preparing for civil litigation in the Florida and Federal courts. The course covers substantive civil law, the Florida and Federal Rules of Civil Procedures and related matters including drafting of pleadings, preparing interrogatories and answers. 47 contact hours.

PLA 2223   CIVIL LITIGATION II

credits: 3  
Prerequisites: PLA 2203 and any approved Speech course. This course is designed to prepare the legal assistant to assist the civil trial attorney in civil litigation, mediation and arbitration in the Florida state and federal actions. This course covers the Florida and Federal Rules of Civil and Appellate Procedure and related matters including the drafting of settlement proposals, preparation of a trial brief, abstracting of depositions, trial procedure, and appellate jurisdiction. The course also addresses jurisdiction of general masters and administrative law systems. 47 contact hours.

PLA 2303   CRIMINAL LITIGATION I

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: PLA 1003. This course is designed to prepare the legal assistant to assist the trial attorney in preparing for criminal litigation in the Florida and federal courts. Special emphasis is placed on substantive criminal law, federal constitutional law and application of the state and federal Rules of Criminal Procedures. 47 contact hours.

PLA 2323   CRIMINAL LITIGATION II

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: PLA 2303. This course is designed to prepare the student to assist the trial attorney in preparing for criminal litigation in the Florida and federal courts. Special emphasis is placed on preparation of a trial brief including voir dire, abstracts of depositions, motion practice and proposed jury instructions. Criminal appeals will be covered as well. 47 contact hours.

PLA 2433   BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: BUL 2241. This course will acquaint the student with typical legal functions connected with the formation and operation of a variety of business entities. It will primarily consider paralegal functions in the field of corporation law, including organization and creation of a corporation, continuing corporate operation problems, typical corporate variations. These will be compared with the formation, operation and regulation of other types of business organization including sole proprietorships, partnerships, limited liability companies and others. 47 contact hours.

PLA 2601   WILLS, TRUSTS, AND ESTATES

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: PLA 1003. This course deals with the basic legal concepts of the more common forms of wills, and the basic procedures and fundamental principles of law applicable to the formal and summary administration of intestate and testate estates with a basic analysis of estate fiduciary accounting. The organization and jurisdiction of the probate division of the circuit courts. The nature and function of testamentary and inter vivos trusts. 47 contact hours.

PLA 2603   GUARDIANSHIP AND ELDER LAW

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: PLA 2601. This course deals with the basic legal concepts and procedures of guardianship law and with the principles and procedures of elder care planning and advance directives. 47 contact hours.

PLA 2610   REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: REE 1040. This course is designed to prepare the paralegal to assist the attorney in the more common types of real estate transactions and conveyances, such as deeds, contracts, and leases. Emphasis is placed on drafting problems involving these various instruments and proper methods of recording, searching, and closing. 47 contact hours.

PLA 2800   FAMILY LAW I

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: PLA 1003. This course will introduce the student to pleading and practice in the field of family law including dissolution, annulment, separate maintenance, and modification actions. Emphasis is placed on drafting pleadings and agreements and methods of discovery as well as trial preparation. 47 contact hours.

PLA 2801   FAMILY LAW II

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: PLA 2800. This course is a continuation of PLA 2800 and will deal with miscellaneous family related areas including adoption, paternity, powers of attorney, juvenile matters, gift and guardianship laws. Emphasis is placed on drafting pleadings and dealing with forms. The student will complete a related research project. 47 contact hours.

PLA 2940   LEGAL ASSISTING SEMINAR AND WORK EXPERIENCE

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Recommendation of division director. This is a one-hour seminar discussing job problems and a minimum of 12 hours per week on-the-job experience as a legal assistant trainee with a law firm or in a law-related office is required. 16 contact hours.

PLA 3240   ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Admission to the Paralegal BAS program. This course is designed to provide an overview of mediation procedure and governing law in Florida. Additionally, it will provide students with the fundamental tools for conflict resolution through negotiation and mediation and will enable them to both understand and apply successful conflict resolution in their forthcoming roles within the legal community. 47 contact hours.

PLA 3306   CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURE

credits: 3  

This course is developed both topically and historically to approach the substantive criminal law and criminal procedure for the upper division student. The course covers the history and basis of U.S. criminal law, delves into an analytical study of the various types of crimes and defenses, and provides an in-depth treatment and real-world view of U.S. criminal procedure. 47 contact hours.

PLA 3410   INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW

credits: 3  

Pre or corequisite: PLA 2114. Prerequisite: Admission to the Paralegal Studies BAS program. This course will provide the student with a working knowledge of the types, nature, registration requirements, and enforcement of patents, trademarks, copyright, trade secrets and trade dress. The student will also be exposed to procedural requirements in protecting and enforcing intellectual property. A component of this course also discusses current and future intellectual property issues on the internet and in the entertainment industry. 47 contact hours.

PLA 3467   BANKRUPTCY

credits: 3  

Pre or corequisite: PLA 2114. Prerequisite: Admission to the Paralegal Studies BAS program. This course gives the student an introduction into the purpose and structure of the bankruptcy laws. This course is designed to teach the student the basic steps a case takes under Chapter 7, 11, and 13 of the Bankruptcy Code. This course will define and demonstrate basic bankruptcy terminology including a discussion of the various roles of debtors, creditors, trustees, and judges in a typical bankruptcy case. 47 contact hours..

PLA 3474   LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT LAW

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: BUL 2241 or BUL 2131 or BUL 3310. This course introduces the student to the basic laws governing labor and employment in the United States with a focus on compliance. Topics covered include the employer/employee relationship, statutory law regarding the workplace, the historical and regulatory scheme of workers compensation, unemployment compensation, the basic statutory law, administrative law, and enforcement scheme governing labor and employment; collective bargaining laws; and civil service and civil rights in the public sector. 47 contact hours.

PLA 3563   INSURANCE LAW

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Paralegal Studies BAS program. This course examines the nature of insurance, insurable interests, the definitions of risk, persons insured, the procedures for filing claims, defenses of the insurer, doctrines of waiver and estoppel, measures of recovery, the insurer's duty to defend, bad faith causes of action, reinsurance, bonds, and regulation of insurance. 47 contact hours.

PLA 3703   SEMINAR IN PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY

credits: 3  
Pre or corequisite: PLA 2114. Prerequisite: Admission to LEGAL-BAS or LEGAL-CT. This course covers ethical responsibilities of legal professionals, a study in the canons of legal ethics, and areas of liability for professional malpractice. This course requires the student to participate in a community service-learning project approved by the college, instructor, and student. 47 contact hours.

PLA 3723   LOGIC AND THE LAW

credits: 3  
Pre or corequisite: PLA 2114. Prerequisite: Admission to the Paralegal Studies BAS program. This course will introduce students to various forms of reasoning and informal fallacies. Subsequently, the course will conduct an in-depth study of deductive syllogistic logic and will conclude by introducing the quantification techniques of propositional and predicate logic (first-order symbolic logic). The course includes logic games and application of logical analytical principles to legal writing. 47 contact hours.

PLA 3734   COMPUTERS AND THE LAW OFFICE

credits: 3  
Pre or corequisite: PLA 2114. Prerequisite: Admission to the Paralegal Studies BAS program. This course introduces the student to the law office work environment and contains instruction and practice on computer programs common to law offices. Applications will include word processing, spreadsheets, databases, document preparation and billing software. 47 contact hours.

PLA 3735   ADVANCED COMPUTERIZED LEGAL RESEARCH

credits: 1  

Prerequisite: PLA 1104. This course is designed to familiarize the student with online legal databases, enhance previously learned research skills, and utilize research skills in completing an advanced research assignment. 16 contact hours.

PLA 3873   SECURITIES LAW

credits: 3  
Pre or corequisite: PLA 2114. Prerequisite: Admission to the Paralegal Studies BAS program. This course surveys federal and state regulation of securities from initial registration and issuance to public trading. The course focuses on the nature and extent of investor protection and the duties and liabilities of corporate officers and directors, the issuer, and others. Various aspects of securities regulation in the area of business entity finance are discussed including such regulatory schemes as the Securities Act of 1933, the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and the Florida Blue Sky laws. 47 contact hours.

PLA 3885   UNITED STATES CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

credits: 3  

Pre or corequisite: PLA 2114. Prerequisite: Admission to Paralegal Studies BAS or admission to Public Policy and Administration BS program. This course is developed both topically and historically to approach the judicial review process, the doctrine of implied powers, the three branches of power, substantive due process along with equal protection, civil rights, free speech and religion. 47 contact hours.

PLA 4116   LEGAL WRITING SEMINAR

credits: 3  
Pre or corequisite: PLA 2114. Prerequisite: Admission to the Paralegal Studies BAS program. This course provides a comprehensive review of the entire legal researching and writing process. The further development of legal researching and writing skills is fostered with special emphasis on analyzing and preparing documents for either the state or federal court system. 47 contact hours.

PLA 4225   CIVIL TRIAL PRACTICE

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: PLA 2203 and PLA 2114. This course is designed to prepare the legal assistant to assist the civil trial attorney in civil litigation in Florida state and federal actions by providing experience preparing for trial. This course covers the Florida and Federal Rules of Civil and Appellate Procedure and the application of the Rules in litigation and the appeals process. The course will teach students how to prepare for a trial including abstracting depositions, preparing a trial brief, preparing pre-trial motions, constructing a trial strategy, and utilizing skills in a mock trial. This course builds on PLA 2203 with a strong focus on trial preparation and practice. Not intended for students who have taken PLA 2223. 47 contact hours.

PLA 4263   EVIDENCE LAW

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: PLA 1003, PLA 1104 and admission to the Paralegal Studies BAS program. This course is designed to introduce the student to the use of evidence in a legal cause of action, the various types of evidence, the paralegal's role in gathering and organizing that evidence, and effective use in alternative dispute resolution or trial. Students will also be taught the importance of the preservation of evidence and chain of custody. The student will be versed in the Federal and Florida Rules of Evidence. 47 contact hours.

PLA 4275   TORT AND PERSONAL INJURY LAW

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: PLA 1003 and PLA 2203. This course is intended to provide an overview of basic concepts and laws within tort and personal injury law. Topics covered include intentional torts, the four elements of negligence, strict liability torts, various types of defamation, malpractice, insurance, and business torts. The applicable defenses to the aforementioned torts will be covered as well. In addition, it will provide the student fundamental tools in this area of the law concerning how law firms function, assessing cases for settlement value, investigating claims, billing hours, and evaluating insurance policies. 47 contact hours.

PLA 4404   COMMERCIAL TRANSACTIONS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: BUL 2241 and admission to the Paralegal Studies BAS program. In this practical skills course, students review and prepare transactional documents associated with the most common business transactions and closings. This course requires the student to be proficient with computer applications as the class will be conducted in a computer lab. 47 contact hours.

PLA 4522   HEALTH CARE LAW

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: BUL 2241 or BUL 2131 or BUL 3310 or permission of Dean. This course is intended to provide an overview of regulations and laws applying to the health care system. Topics covered include the contractual relationship established between patient and provider as well as patient and health insurance company; state and federal regulations regarding licensing, health care facilities, and health care insurance; and state and federal laws governing health care, privacy and bioethics. In addition, the course will give an in-depth look at the governing case law in each of these areas as well as addressing issues surrounding liability in the health care profession and medical malpractice. 47 contact hours.

PLA 4554   ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: PLA 1003 and PLA 2203. This course is intended to provide an overview of concepts and laws within environmental law. Topics covered include the history and foundations of environmental law and the main laws and regulations surrounding the protection of our environment. An in-depth examination of the applicable laws and regulations will be pursued to achieve the requisite knowledge of environmental issues. 47 contact hours.

PLA 4613   REAL PROPERTY LAW

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: PLA 1003 and enrollment in the Paralegal Studies BAS program or permission of the Dean. This course is designed to provide students with a basic overview of real property law with transactional considerations. Topics covered include: the basic elements of real property law, the different methods used to record and describe property, the methods used to transfer title, the rights associated with real estate ownership, the elements of real estate contracts, the basic elements of landlord/tenant law, deeds, mortgages, restrictions on land use, title insurance and title examinations, the closing process, and tax implications. Emphasis will be placed on the practical application of the skills necessary to perform drafting and review of related documents. 47 contact hours.

PLA 4806   FAMILY LAW

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: PLA 1003. This course is a study of cases, Florida Statutes, and legal principles relevant to the formation, regulation and dissolution of the family unit, and to legal obligations which arise within the family relationship. The course considers: nuptial agreements, marriage, annulment, divorce, division of property, maintenance, custody, visitation, child support, tax law, adoption, paternity, and ethical issues. Emphasis is placed on developing practical skills such as the creation of pleadings, agreements, discovery, and trial preparation. 47 contact hours.

PLA 4827   SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT LAW

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: BUL 2241 or BUL 2131 or BUL 3310. This course introduces the student to basic concepts and regulations within the sports and entertainment industry with a focus on contract, constitutional, and intellectual property law. Topics covered in the area of sports law include the history of sports agents, torts and crimes in sports, Title IX and women’s issues, contract law regarding athletes, financial and compensation considerations, American with Disabilities Act in sports, athlete/celebrity status, and intellectual property issues. Topics covered in the area of entertainment law include the legal structure of film, television, music, live stage, and publishing industries, contract law regarding entertainers, credits and compensation, constitutional considerations, and intellectual property law issues. 47 contact hours.

PLA 4830   COMPARATIVE LEGAL SYSTEMS

credits: 3  
Pre or corequisite: PLA 2114. Prerequisite: Admission to the Paralegal Studies BAS program. This course provides an examination of various legal traditions and systems of the world. International law and transboundary issues will be discussed. Substantive and procedural laws will be examined. Availability of resources will be emphasized. 47 contact hours.

PLA 4843   IMMIGRATION LAW

credits: 3  

Pre or corequisite: PLA 2114. Prerequisite: Admission to LEGAL-BAS or LEGAL-CT. This course is intended to provide an overview of U.S. immigration laws. Special emphasis is placed on the practical aspects of immigration law, an examination of the substantive and procedural aspects of this type of practice, and an analysis of the changes in our immigration laws and policies post September 11, 2001. In addition, it will provide the student fundamental tools in this area of the law concerning interviewing a client as well as forms and documents requirements. 47 contact hours.

PLA 4876   ANIMAL LAW

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: PLA 1003 and admission to the Paralegal Studies BAS program. This course is designed to review a wide range of legal policies as they apply to the emerging field of animal law. Considerations include contract applications, tort and criminal law, state and federal regulation of all types of animals, and discussing of rights and responsibilities pertaining to animals. 47 contact hours.

PLA 4941   PARALEGAL STUDIES CAPSTONE

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Permission of Dean and senior standing. This is the capstone course for the Paralegal Studies program. It will provide the opportunity for the student to demonstrate that he/she has learned both the theoretical material and practical skills from the program and can apply them in the real world. It must be taken during the student’s last semester at the college. This course focuses on giving the student the opportunity to develop and present a plan to solve a problem dealing with paralegal issues today. The student will choose a topic for a project consistent with the goals of this course and submit it to the course instructor for approval. 45 contact hours.

PLA 4944   PARALEGAL CERTIFICATE CAPSTONE

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Paralegal Studies BAS program or Paralegal Studies Certificate Program and permission of the Dean. This is the capstone course for the Paralegal Studies Certificate Program. It will provide the opportunity for the student to demonstrate that he/she has learned both the theoretical material and practical skills from the certificate courses and can sufficiently apply them to the Certified Legal Assisting examination. It must be taken during the student’s last session of the certificate program. A substantive review of the CLA examination topics will be covered along with practice examinations. The student will also develop a professional portfolio which is representative of the work product and assignments completed throughout the certificate courses. 45 contact hours.

PLA 4949   PARALEGAL STUDIES CO-OP WORK EXPERIENCE

credits: 1-3  

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the PLA-BAS program and Faculty Advisor/Co-op Coordinator or Dean Approval. This course is designed to provide students with major-related, supervised, evaluated practical training work experiences which may be paid or voluntary. Students are graded on the basis of documented learning acquired through hands-on experiences in an actual work setting. The student must fulfill the requirement of 60 on-the-job hours for each credit earned in addition to written assignments.

POS 2041   AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT

credits: 3  

"G" Prerequisite: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017) or EAP 1695 or appropriate score on the SPC placement test. This survey course provides a comprehensive examination of the American political system. Through this course students will become familiar with theory, organization, principles, and function of the American national government, and various elements within the political system that work to shape policy outcomes. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. Credit is only given for one of the following: POS 2041 or POS 2050H or IDS 2103H. 47 contact hours.

POS 2050H   HONORS AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

credits: 3  
"G" Prerequisite: Appropriate score on the SPC placement test or acceptance into the Honors College or approval of program director. This survey course provides a comprehensive and analytic examination of the American political system to students eligible for Honors classes. Through various teaching and learning methodologies, the student will become familiar with the theories, organization, principles and functions of the American national government. The course will cultivate independent, active learning, student participation and encourage the use of logical reasoning, in-depth analysis and critical thinking skills to examine the various elements within our political system which shape policy outcomes. This course partially satisfies the writing requirement outlined in the General Education Requirements. Credit is only given for one of the following: POS 2050H or POS 2041 or IDS 2103H. 47 contact hours.

POS 2112   STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT

credits: 3  

"G" Prerequisite: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017) or EAP 1695 or satisfactory score on the SPC placement test. This course is an examination of the institutions and processes of Federalism, political parties, state governments, state protected civil liberties, counties, municipalities, special districts, and regional compacts. Examples and illustrations of processes and procedures will be drawn mainly upon the Florida government. This course partially satisfies the Gordon Rule writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. 47 contact hours.

POS 3235   MASS MEDIA AND POLICY

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Public Policy and Administration BS Program. This course provides an overview of the complex relationships between government, the media, and the public with a focus on the impact of the various political aspects involved. Additional emphasis will be placed on how the media influences governmental institutions, policy action/functions and in turn, how the government shapes the way the media disseminates information. Students will learn how to describe social media trends and how they differ from traditional media outlets. 47 contact hours

PPE 2001   PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: PSY 1012. This course deals with the theories and principles through which individual differences in typical modes of acting, feeling, and thinking are acquired. Extensive attention is given to an understanding of the various factors influencing effective as well as ineffective patterns of adjustment, with consideration of the degree to which the individual can, through his/her knowledge and efforts, have an influence on his/her own personality patterns. Social diversity as it relates to the development of personality patterns is incorporated. This course has a substantial writing requirement. 47 contact hours.

PRO 3000C   INTRODUCTION TO ORTHOTICS, PROSTHETICS, AND REHABILITATION

credits: 2  

Prerequisites: Admission to the Orthotic & Prosthetic BAS Program. This course focuses on the development of knowledge necessary to understand the rehabilitation process as it relates to the delivery of orthotic/prosthetic care. The prosthetic and orthotics professions are presented in terms of the integration of the biological, medical, and engineering sciences. Students will develop a solid foundation of the principles and practice of orthotics and prosthetics and the materials and technology associated with the manufacture of custom devices. The laboratory component section will develop psychomotor skills for the application of contemporary technology at the introductory level. 62 contact hours.

PRO 3100   BIOMECHANICS

credits: 2  

Prerequisites: Admission to the Orthotics and Prosthetics BAS program. This course examines the application of mechanics on living organisms. It includes the application of engineering principles to and from biological systems producing movement and stabilization. The student will learn the mechanics of orthotic and prosthetic applications as they relate to human movement and stabilization, and the joint mechanics that hinder or restrict these movements. The student will be introduced to biomechanical measurement instruments (i.e. force plates, pressure transducers, temporal, spatial, and video analysis) used to quantify the kinetic effects associated with physical activity. 32 contact hours.

PRO 3110   CLINICAL PATHOPHYSIOLOGY

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Orthotics and Prosthetics BAS program. This course focuses on the pathophysiology, clinical signs and symptoms associated with numerous diseases and traumatic injuries as they relate to the practice of orthotics and prosthetics. Clinical Pathophysiology provides a comprehensive foundation to build the students knowledge of specific clinical disorders commonly seen in the field of orthotics and prosthetics. Each condition is presented in terms of the diagnoses, tests, treatment regimes, rehabilitation, prognosis and its morbidity. Students will learn the proper method to review case materials (history, physical exam, laboratory data, etc), to develop differential diagnoses for a specific patient presentation. Relevant case studies are presented to develop an understanding of the role of the prosthetist and orthotist in the rehabilitation process. Students will also participate in weekly literature reviews and online discussions to provide an in-depth study of recent research on the major diseases encountered in a clinical orthotic/prosthetic practice. 47 contact hours.

PRO 3120C   GAIT ANALYSIS AND PATHOMECHANICS

credits: 2  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Orthotics and Prosthetics BAS program. This course focuses on normal human locomotion and pathological gait. The students will learn the mechanics of human locomotion and the kinematics associated with all phases of gait; identify the events that occur during the gait cycle; and identify gait deviations due to clinical pathologies or compensations. Laboratory portion will augment the learning with temporal, spatial, and video analysis of normal and pathological gait. 62 contact hours.

PRO 3200C   HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY FOR ORTHOTICS AND PROSTHETICS

credits: 4  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Orthotics and Prosthetics BAS program. This course focuses on examination of the human body as it is relevant to orthotics and prosthetics. Specific systems focused on will be cardiovascular, skeletal, neurological, and muscular. Particular emphasis will be placed on the extremities and the spine. 92 contact hours.

PRO 3301C   TRANSTIBIAL PROSTHETICS

credits: 5  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Orthotics and Prosthetics BAS program. This course will present prosthetic treatment modalities of the lower extremity distal to the knee. Students in this course will receive instruction on the assessment, formulation, implementation and follow up of a prosthetic treatment plan for transtibial and symes amputation levels. Concurrent lower extremity lab activities with patient models will allow the student to correlate clinical findings with evidence based practice to synthesize the significance of the appropriate choice of components, principles, material properties, socket design, prosthetic alignment and medical management. Application of technology, including CAD/CAM imaging will be incorporated throughout the course projects. Relevant case studies will be discussed to facilitate clinical problem solving skills. 167 contact hours.

PRO 3310C   LOWER EXTREMITY ORTHOTICS I

credits: 4  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Orthotics and Prosthetics BAS program and completion of PRO 3100, PRO3200C. This course will present orthotic treatment modalities of the lower extremity distal to the knee. Students in this course will receive instruction on the assessment, formulation, implementation, and follow up of an orthotic treatment plan for common foot and/or ankle disorders affecting pediatric, adult and geriatric populations. Concurrent lower extremity lab activities with patient models will allow the student to correlate clinical findings with evidence based practice to synthesize the significance of the appropriate choice of components, principles, material properties, and medical management. The student will interact with multiple orthotic systems. 122 contact hours.

PRO 3311C   LOWER EXTREMITY ORTHOTICS II

credits: 5  

Prerequisites: PRO 3310C and Admission to the Orthotics and Prosthetics BAS program. This course will present orthotic treatment modalities of the lower extremity proximal to the knee. Students in this course will receive instruction on the assessment, formulation, implementation, and follow up of an orthotic treatment plan for common knee, hip and/or total lower extremity disorders affecting pediatric, adult and geriatric populations. Concurrent lower extremity lab activities with patient models will allow the student to correlate clinical findings with evidence based practice to synthesize the significance of the appropriate choice of components, principles, material properties and medical management. The student will interact with multiple orthotic systems. 137 contact hours.

PRO 3500C   CLINICAL METHODS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Orthotics and Prosthetics BAS Program. This course focuses on understanding the role of a prosthetist-orthotist as it relates to the patient and other healthcare professionals. Students will learn sound clinical evaluation skills using standardized assessment methods and skilled observations to formulate a comprehensive assessment of a patient. Students will utilize various assessments to produce written documentation that includes the formulation, implementation and effective follow up plans for clinical settings using evidence based practice. The laboratory portion will focus on patient assessment skills and documentation procedures. 77 contact hours.

PRO 3505   CLINICAL PROBLEM SOLVING

credits: 2-3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Orthotics and Prosthetics BAS program or permission of the Dean. This course will focus on the development and presentation of comprehensive orthotic/prosthetic treatment plans through the analysis and synthesis of information gleaned through the clinical evaluation and assessment process. Formulation of the treatment plan is one of the six practice domains of the orthotist prosthetist. 32 contact hours.

PRO 3801L   ORTHOTICS AND PROSTHETICS CLINICAL ROTATION

credits: 2  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Orthotics and Prosthetics (O&P) BAS program. This course is part of a series of clinical rotations in which students observe, assist, and practice patient care and device fabrication in an environment that prepares them for an orthotic or prosthetic residency. Students study traditional and emerging topics related to the O&P field and are then placed at a clinical agency to practice skills under close supervision of an American Board Certified (ABC) prosthetist/orthotist. The topic of concentration in each clinical rotation is different; however, students are required to demonstrate mastery of patient and clinical assessments; the design, implementation, and follow-up of comprehensive treatment plans; technical skills; and communication skills with increasing competency as they progress through the series. Students are required to document patient interactions and case analysis of their clinical experiences, and to present case studies to an audience of peers. 110 contact hours.

PRO 4001C   ADVANCED TOPICS AND LAB

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Orthotics and Prosthetics BAS program. The course builds on current prosthetic and orthotic design principles by introducing additional available technologies and research trends. Topics to include: image capture and computer aided design; osseointegration; limb regeneration; direct neural control and limb transplants; recreational and high activity devices; adaptive sports equipment; and sensory feed back. 77 contact hours.

PRO 4130   MATERIAL SCIENCE

credits: 2  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Orthotics and Prosthetics BAS program. This course focuses on the mechanical properties of various materials used in orthotics and prosthetics. Some of the materials discussed will include metals, thermoset plastics, thermoplastics, and composites. 32 contact hours.

PRO 4190   RESEARCH METHODS

credits: 2-3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Orthotics and Prosthetics BAS Program. This course provides the student with an understanding of the research process. The student will develop techniques used in scientific research to critically evaluate scientific papers with regard to the measurements and methods used. The student will learn to formulate a simple research project and employ quantitative testing methods to reach conclusions. 32 contact hours.

PRO 4331C   TRANSFEMORAL PROSTHETICS

credits: 5  

Prerequisites: PRO 3301C and admission to the Orthotics and Prosthetics BAS program. This course will present prosthetic treatment modalities of the lower extremity proximal to the knee. Students will receive instruction on the assessment, formulation, implementation, and follow up of a prosthetic treatment plan for knee disarticulation, transfemoral, hip disarticulation and hemipelvectomy amputation levels. Concurrent lower extremity lab activities with patient models will allow students to correlate clinical findings with evidence based practice to synthesize the significance of the appropriate choice of components, principles, material properties, socket design, prosthetic alignment and medical management. Relevant case studies will be discussed to facilitate clinical problem solving skills. This course requires comprehensive integration of the student’s knowledge of anatomy, biomechanics and prosthetic principles. 137 contact hours.

PRO 4350C   SPINAL ORTHOTICS

credits: 5  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Orthotics and Prosthetics BAS program. This course will present orthotic treatment modalities of the spine and cranium. Students will receive instruction on the assessment, formulation, implementation and follow up of an orthotic treatment plan for common spinal and cranial disorders affecting pediatric, adult and geriatric populations. Concurrent lab activities with patient models will allow the student to correlate clinical findings with evidence based practice to synthesize the significance of the appropriate choice of components, principles, material properties and medical management. The student will interact with multiple orthotic systems. 137 contact hours.

PRO 4361C   UPPER EXTREMITY PROSTHETICS

credits: 4  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Orthotics and Prosthetics BAS program. This course focuses on anatomy, biomechanics and prosthetic principles and materials to solve clinical problems affecting patients with upper extremity amputations. The student will learn to measure, cast, fabricate, design, and manufacture prostheses for partial hand, wrist disarticulation, transradial, elbow disarticulation, transhumeral, shoulder disarticulation, and thoraco-scapular amputation levels. The student will learn biomechanics of the socket fit and prosthetic alignment, and upper limb prosthetic control strategies. This course requires comprehensive integration of the students' knowledge of anatomy, biomechanics and prosthetic principles. 92 contact hours.

PRO 4371C   UPPER EXTREMITY ORTHOTICS

credits: 4  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Orthotics and Prosthetics BAS program. This course will present orthotic treatment modalities of the upper extremity. Students in this course will receive instruction on the assessment, formulation, implementation, and follow-up of an orthotic treatment plan for common finger, wrist, elbow and/or shoulder disorders affecting pediatric, adult and geriatric populations. Concurrent upper extremity lab activities with patient models will allow the student to correlate clinical findings with evidence based practice to synthesize the significance of the appropriate choice of components, principles, material properties and medical management. The student will interact with multiple orthotic systems. 92 contact hours.

PRO 4410   CAD/CAM FOR ORTHOTICS AND PROSTHETICS

credits: 2  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Orthotics and Prosthetics BAS program. This course focuses on the utilization of computer automated design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) in orthotics and prosthetics. Students will develop the knowledge and skills needed to measure and manufacture orthoses and prostheses through the tools of CAD/CAM including computers, digitizers, scanners, lathes, and milling machines. 32 contact hours.

PRO 4600   PRACTICE MANAGEMENT ORTHOTICS AND PROSTHETICS

credits: 2  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Orthotics and Prosthetics BAS program. This course will expose students to business fundamentals and development skills needed to manage an orthotic and prosthetics practice. The student will learn different billing software systems available for electronic billing. The students will be introduced to Medicare and other reimbursement systems in orthotic and prosthetics. The student will learn about the American Board of Certification (ABC) code of ethics, professionalism and how to apply those skills to current coding techniques in orthotics and prosthetics. 32 contact hours.

PRO 4850   SENIOR CAPSTONE

credits: 2  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Orthotics and Prosthetics BAS program or permission of the Dean of College of Health Sciences. This course is designed to assess the student’s comprehensive knowledge of orthotics and prosthetics. Prior course work is synthesized and facilitated through patient interactions and cumulating, comprehensive examinations to emphasize clinical problem solving skills, patient management and professional/personal development. Students in this course are required to successfully complete and pass all culminating exam materials. 32 contact hours.

PSC 1001C   PHYSICAL SCIENCE WITH LAB

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017 and MAT 0028) or EAP 1695, and MAT 0028. This course is to acquaint the student with the history and development of physical science with the integration principles and theories in the physical sciences, and with the practice of a scientific method. (This course may not be taken for credit after receiving a grade of "C" or better in any course with a prefix of CHM or PHY.) 77 contact hours.

PSY 1012   GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY

credits: 3  

"G" Prerequisites: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017) or EAP 1695, or appropriate score on the SPC placement test. This course is an introduction to the field of psychology. It includes the history, scientific methodology, major theoretical schools of thought, various approaches to interpersonal functioning, and human development. The effects of ethnicity, age, race, and gender are integrated into the study of the discipline (course). This course partially satisfies the Gordon Rule writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. 47 contact hours.

PSY 1020H   HONORS GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY

credits: 3  
"G" Prerequisite: Meets Honors College entrance criteria or approval of the program director. This course is an advance-level introduction to psychology. This course will emphasize the evaluation and synthesis of psychological concepts by examining the history, scientific methodology, major theoretical schools of thought, various approaches to interpersonal functioning, and human development. The effects of ethnicity, age, race, and gender are integrated into the study of this course. This course will have a substantial writing assignment. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements as outlined in the General Education Requirements. 47 contact hours.

PUP 3002   INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC POLICY & ADMINISTRATION

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the BS Public Policy and Administration program. This course will provide a basic foundation in the conceptual frameworks, research perspectives and practical considerations of policy origination, interpretation/implementation and organizational behavior management within public organizations. The emphasis will be on critical thinking and a problem solving approach to improving organizational performance. Course content is guided by the practical aspects of theory, research, best practices, and the past and current real world experience of managers. 47 contact hours.

PUP 3023   PUBLIC POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION LEGAL RESEARCH

credits: 3  

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Public Policy and Administration BS Program. Pre- or corequisite(s): PUP 3002. This course will provide the student with a working knowledge of the major techniques utilized in legal research, analysis, and writing. It will introduce the student to a broad practical approach to the use of legal publications in addressing public policy and administration issues. This course familiarizes the student with computerized legal research databases and enhances previously learned research skills to include a focus on policy development/ implementation, programs and projects. The student will build upon the essential building blocks of how government works. The student will complete assigned problems and scenarios in legal research. 47 contact hours.

PUP 3033   POLICY LEADERSHIP

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Public Policy and Administration BS Program. Pre- or co-requisite: PUP 3040. This course introduces students to the relationship between leadership and policy and the organizational dynamics that influence the implementation of public policy. Students will experience all phases of developing policy, from identifying stakeholders and their competing perspectives, to determining factors that impact the sustainability of public policy. Emphasis will be placed on the varying leadership styles used to work with diverse groups and in one-on-one interactions for the purpose on influencing policy development, analysis, decision making, implementation, and improvement. 47 contact hours.

PUP 3040   STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC POLICY

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission into the Bachelor of Science Public Policy and Administration program and PUP 3002. This course will provide a basic foundation in the conceptual frameworks, research perspectives, practical and political considerations of state and local government and its relationship to public policy to include its origin, interpretation and implementation. The emphasis will be on critical thinking, “the art of negotiation”, diplomacy, problem solving and decision making. Course content is guided by the practical aspects of theory, research, best practices, and past and current real world experience of public managers. 47 contact hours.

PUP 3043   EVALUATING PUBLIC POLICY (RESEARCH METHODS I)

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to Public Policy and Administration BS. Pre- or corequisite: PUP 3040. This course will provide an introduction to research methods used in public policy and administration. The student will be introduced to several concepts including initiating and organizing a research study, appropriate study designs, measurement of variables, sampling techniques, use of surveys and protection of human subjects and other ethical issues. 47 contact hours.

PUP 3046   POLICY DATA ANALYSIS (RESEARCH METHODS II)

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to Public Policy and Administration BS and PUP3043 Research Methods I. This course will provide an introduction to statistical research methods used in public policy and administration. The student will be introduced to strategies for data analysis including correlation, simple linear regression, hypothesis testing, use of indices and effective communication of research findings in public policy and administration. 47 contact hours.

PUP 3052   ISSUES IN INTERNATIONAL POLICY

credits: 3  

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Public Policy and Administration BS program. This course provides students with an overview of contemporary international issues and the knowledge necessary to engage in a detailed examination and constructive discussion of these issues. Focus is placed on three broad categories: conflict, security and terrorism; globalization and the international economy; and, international human rights and justice. Students will craft solutions to these issues and present them in a peer group setting. Students will learn about important geographical and geostrategic factors contributing to the menu of political crises examined. The class is debate-driven, meaning issues are examined based on differing viewpoints and the merits of each. Students will engage in a substantive case study of international diplomacy through the use of a Model UN Module, where students will represent nations, draft written submissions, and engage in debate about a current issue in the international arena. 47 contact hours.

PUP 3054   POLICY AND ETHICS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite(s): Admission to Public Policy and Administration BS program. This course will introduce students to policy and ethics as a process of reasonable, rational and responsible decision making in the workplace. The student will analyze policy, political and ethical issues that managers and public organizations face in today’s environment. 47 contact hours.

PUP 3055   PUBLIC POLICY AND NEGOTIATION

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Public Policy and Administration BS Program. This course provides a basic foundation into the principles of dispute resolution and consensus-building on public disputes, policy development and program implementation. Emphasis will be placed on combining theoretical and practical applications addressing government, business and citizen groups in managing public disputes and policy making development. Federal, state and local case studies and exercises are employed to help students develop skills in multi-party conflict analysis, assessment for dispute resolution intervention, and negotiation and facilitation processes. Course content is guided by an understanding that social and economic growth has a direct impact on the timing, tolerance, politics and power involved in the dynamics of conflict resolution and consensus building. 47 contact hours

PUP 4941   PUBLIC POLICY CAPSTONE

credits: 3  

Prerequisite(s): Completion of all core courses in the Public Policy and Administration BS program or permission of the dean. This is the capstone course for the Public Policy and Administration program and will provide the opportunity for the student to demonstrate that he/she has learned both the theoretical material and practical skills from the program and can apply them in the real world. It must be taken during the student’s last semester in the program. This course focuses on giving the student the opportunity to develop and present a policy to address a current issue in public policy and administration. The student will choose a topic for a project consistent with the goals of this program and submit it to the course instructor for approval. 47 contact hours.

PUP 4949   PUBLIC POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION CO-OP WORK EXPERIENCE

credits: 3  

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Public Policy and Administration BS program, and Faculty Advisor/Co-op Coordinator or Program Director Approval. This course is designed to provide students with major-related, supervised, evaluated practical training work experiences which may be paid or voluntary. Students are graded on the basis of documented learning acquired through hands-on experiences in an actual work setting. Variable credits are available, one to three per course. The student must fulfill the requirement of 180 on-the-job hours in addition to written assignments.


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