Course List


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REA 0007   DEVELOPMENTAL READING I

credits: 4  

This course # was formerly REA 0001. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on the SPC placement test. This is a college preparatory reading course designed to develop basic vocabulary skills, reading comprehension and study skills. Three class hours and two lab hours for a total of five hours weekly are required. (NOTE: A student cannot earn credit in REA 0007 after receiving credit for REA 0017 or REA 1105. Credit for REA 0007 cannot be used toward graduation.) 77 contact hours.

REA 0017   DEVELOPMENTAL READING II

credits: 4  

This course # was formerly REA 0002. Prerequisite: REA 0007 or an appropriate score on the SPC placement test. This college preparatory reading course improves vocabulary skills, reading comprehension, and study strategies. Three class hours and two lab hours for a total of five hours weekly. (NOTE: A student cannot enroll in REA 0017 after receiving credit for REA 1105. Credit for REA 0017 cannot be used toward graduation.) 77 contact hours.

REA 0990   READING TECHNIQUES II: MY BRIDGE TO SUCCESS

credits: 1-3  
Prerequisite: Appropriate score on the SPC placement test or approval of a Communications Department program administrator. This flexible entry/exit college preparatory course is designed to improve academic vocabulary skills and proficiency in college-level comprehension skills using course modules. Course strategies will include one-on-one instruction, small group instruction, and computer instruction in a lab setting. This course is intended to prepare students for successful completion of college-level courses. 17 contact hours minimum.

REA 1105   CRITICAL READING AND THINKING

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: REA 0017 or EAP 1695 or appropriate score on the SPC placement test. This course is designed to develop and enhance literal and critical reading skills and vocabulary. Emphasis is also on critical thinking skills: analysis, interpretation, synthesis, and evaluation. (Note: A student cannot earn credit in REA 1105 after receiving credit for REA 1205.) 47 contact hours.

RED 3309   EARLY AND EMERGENT LITERACY K-2

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to Educational Studies BS, or Elementary Education with Infused ESOL and Reading BS, or Exceptional Student Education with Infused ESOL and Reading BS, or Initial Certification. This course is designed to increase understanding of early literacy development and the conditions which promote total literacy for children birth to second grade. Language theory and current research are used to shape informed practices regarding literacy development. Connections are made among all aspects of literacy learning, including reading, writing, listening and speaking. The course explores research-based best practices in teaching literacy to young children. It includes a minimum of 15 school based hours of participation/observation of reading in educational setting(s).  47 contact hours.

RED 4009   EMERGENT LANGUAGE AND LITERACY

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to Prekindergarten/Primary Education (age 3 through grade 3) with Infused ESOL and Reading BS. The purpose of this course is to promote the understanding of the developmental trajectory of emergent literacy through oral language/vocabulary, phonemic/phonological awareness, concepts of print, listening comprehension and writing for preschool children ages 0-5. Oral language theories, current emergent reading research and developmentally appropriate assessments align language development to best practice for emergent literacy learning. The role of emergent language and literacy learning: reading, writing, listening, speaking and thinking are explored while addressing the social, emotional, physical and creative development for young children. The course explores and develops many related activities to foster a balanced, differentiated, positive and constructive approach towards literacy learning for all young children. It includes a minimum of 15 school-based hours of observation/teaching/assessing reading in educational setting(s). This course is writing intensive. 47 contact hours.

RED 4014   READING/WRITING & LANGUAGE ARTS SKILLS IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, K-6

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to EPI-CT. The design of this course is to promote an understanding of the stages of literacy development from emergent to mature readers through a balanced literacy model for diverse learners in grades K-6. Language theories, current reading research, assessment, and remediation/interventions through diagnostic evaluation are used to shape informed practices regarding literacy development. Connections are made among all aspects of literacy learning: reading, writing, listening, speaking and motivation/attitude development through lectures and field experiences that enable teacher candidates to practice and demonstrate the five essential components of effective reading instruction (oral language/phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension.) The course explores and develops many related activities to foster a balanced, differentiated, positive, constructive approach towards literacy learning for diverse learners, with an emphasis on struggling readers. It includes a minimum of 15 school-based hours of observation/teaching/assessing reading in educational settings. This course is writing intensive. 47 contact hours.

RED 4043   READING WITHIN THE DISCIPLINES 5-12

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to EPI-CT or ICERT-NO or RCERT-NO. This course examines the fundamentals of teaching reading including comprehension, fluency, and vocabulary within various disciplines in the secondary grades. The major emphasis of the course is teaching reading as a process to enhance metacognition and support understanding of more complex text, including informational and narrative forms. In addition, a major focus area is using informal and formal reading assessment to guide instruction. This course is blended. 47 contact hours.

RED 4304   EARLY LITERACY LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT PRE-K - GRADE 3

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to Prekindergarten/Primary Education (age 3 through grade 3) with Infused ESOL and Reading Endorsements (PKPED-BS). The design of this course is to increase the understanding of the stages of early literacy development from the emergent to fluent level and the conditions that promote total literacy for all children Pre-K through 3rd grade. Language theories, current reading research, assessment, remediation/ interventions through diagnostic evaluation are used to shape informed practices regarding literacy development. Connections are made among all aspects of literacy learning: reading, writing, listening, speaking and attitude development. The course explores and develops many related activities to foster a balanced, differentiated, positive, constructive approach towards literacy learning for all young children. It includes a minimum of 15 school-based hours of observation/teaching/assessing reading in educational setting(s). This course is writing intensive.”

RED 4324   READING IN THE MIDDLE SCHOOL

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Admission to Middle Grades Math Education BS, Middle Grades Science Education BS, Middle Grades Math EPI, Middle Grades Science EPI or Initial Certification. This course is designed for middle grades teachers who need developmental reading/literacy and assessment strategies for adolescents. The major emphasis of the course is placed on current theories, practical strategies, development of teaching techniques, and materials used in reading/literacy instruction to improve both academic and recreational reading. The emphasis is placed on the key No Child Left Behind literacy areas of Fluency, Vocabulary, and Comprehension for both content understanding and diagnosis of reading difficulties at that level. Lecture, discussion, simulated teaching, and field work constitute different course activities. 47 contact hours. 20 school-based hours required.

RED 4335   READING IN THE CONTENT AREA

credits: 3  

Prerequisite:

Admission to Secondary Science Education BS, OR
Middle Grades Math Education BS, OR
Middle Grades Science Education BS, OR
Secondary Math Education BS, OR
Initial Certification.

This course is designed to promote the effective teaching of literacy skills across the curriculum. The major emphasis of this course is placed on current theories, methods, and materials used in content area literacy instruction. Lecture, discussion, simulated teaching, and field work constitute different course activities. 47 contact hours

RED 4335 / Topic #2: READING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM: EPI

Prerequisite: Must be in the EPI programs. This is a two-credit course designed to promotes effective teaching of literacy skills. Through lecture, discussion, and simulated teaching, students learn to apply appropriate strategies and assessments for diverse learners, employ exemplary practices and create learning environments that promote and build literacy across the curriculum. 32 contact hours.

RED 4511   INTERMEDIATE LITERACY 3-6: READING, WRITING AND THINKING

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to Elementary Education with Infused ESOL and Reading, AND RED 3309 and EDG 3620 OR Admission to Exceptional Student Education with Infused ESOL and Reading, AND RED 3309 and EEX 3241. This course is an intermediate reading and writing course that combines the study of theory and practice in the teaching of developmental reading, writing and critical thinking in grades 3-6. The major emphasis of the course is on current theories, methods, and materials used in reading/literacy and writing instruction. Lecture, discussion, simulated teaching and fieldwork constitute different course activities. 47 contact hours.

RED 4519   DIAGNOSIS AND INTERVENTION IN READING

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: RED 3309 and RED 4511 and admission to Elementary Education with infused ESOL and Reading BS, or Exceptional Student Education with infused ESOL and Reading BS, or Elementary Education EPI, or Exceptional Student Education EPI. This course is designed to focus on formal and informal reading assessments (e.g., formal-norm-referenced/criterion-referenced assessments, and informal-reading inventories). Students will complete diagnostic case studies to demonstrate their ability to interpret pre-existing data reports, select and administer appropriate assessments and analyze data to inform reading instruction. Topics include quantitative and qualitative assessments that address elements of reading (e.g., comprehension, word recognition, phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, oral language and writing.) The major emphasis of the course is on diagnosis of reading problems, administration of the assessments, evaluation of results, and planning instruction/interventions for remediation. Lecture, discussion, simulated assessment practice, and an actual diagnostic case study, constitute different course activities. 20 school- based hours. 47 contact hours.

RED 4940   FINAL READING INTERNSHIP

credits: 1  

Prerequisite: (Admission to Elementary Education BS and corequisite EDE 4940 with a minimum grade of C) or (Exceptional Student Education BS and corequisite EEX 4940 with a minimum grade of C) or (Prekindergarten/Primary Education (age 3 through grade 3) with Infused ESOL and Reading BS and corequisite EEC 4946 with a minimum grade of C). This course is designed as a supervised reading portion of the final internship to give practical experience in reading for the pre-service teacher. This course aligns directly to the Florida Reading Competencies, which include language development, cognition, research-proven best practices, and differentiated instruction. Students will work directly with PreK-12 teachers and students in the public schools in large group, small group, and individual settings to connect all aspects of theoretical, campus-based literacy instruction to classroom practice. This course is designed to demonstrate specific skills and strategies in reading relative to program planning, instruction, daily scheduling, record keeping, evaluation, classroom management, communication, ethics, and professional development. Contact hours: Students will spend a minimum of 5 hours per week for 15 weeks. 

REE 1040   REAL ESTATE PRINCIPLES AND LICENSE LAW

credits: 4  

Successful completion of this course is one of the prerequisites to taking the Florida salesman's licensing examination. Topics include business brokerage operations, property law, deeds, mortgages, financing, taxes, planning and zoning, appraisal, real estate investment and market analysis, public housing, governmental regulations, securities licensing requirements to sell direct participation programs in real estate, in-depth study of the fundamental principles of Florida real estate license law with emphasis on violations of the license law and penal and procedural aspects of its enforcement, ethical issues, and case studies of selected topics in agency and brokerage operations. Also included will be preparation of real estate contracts and closing statements. 62 contact hours.

REL 1002   NEW RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: ENC 0025 or EAP 1695 or satisfactory score on the SPC placement test. This course examines religious movements since 1800 with particular emphasis on the association with and deviation from traditional religions. Global in perspective, this course examines the context and content of new religions; elaborates their social meaning and significance; and reviews the ways these religions express new forms of organization, offer distinct moral perspectives, and provide alternative spiritualities. 47 contact hours.

REL 1060   RELIGION AND POLITICS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: ENC 0025 or EAP 1695 or satisfactory score on the SPC placement test. This course examines the relationship between religion and politics, the interaction between personal conviction and public service. It explores the American commitment to the separation of church and state and how this has shaped the role of religion in society. This American model is then contrasted to the way other cultures interpret the place of religion in a contemporary world. 47 contact hours.

REL 1070   WOMEN IN WORLD RELIGIONS

credits: 3  
This course examines the world religions through the perspectives of the feminine. Topics include the role of women in religion, major female religious figures, and the divine expression of the feminine. Examples of world religions examined are Indigenous Religions, Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Christianity, Islam and New Religious Movements are examined. Women and the feminine will be explored through cultural contexts, purpose for life and the uniqueness of the role of women in religious practice. 47 contact hours.

REL 1210   OLD TESTAMENT SURVEY

credits: 3  
This course is designed to give the student an overview of Old Testament religious perspectives as reflected in the geographical, historical, thematic development, and cultural influences of the biblical text. The study will include an examination of the issues of text integrity, content problems, higher criticism, and theological insights. 47 contact hours.

REL 1240   NEW TESTAMENT SURVEY

credits: 3  
This course is an introductory study of the historical, cultural, literary, and religious concepts in the New Testament. Topics include: "the synoptic problem," "the historical Jesus," "the social and economic ideas of the Acts," and "the relation of Petrine with Pauline concepts of social classes." 47 contact hours.

REL 2000   INTRODUCTION TO RELIGION

credits: 3  
This course is a study of the phenomena of religious belief and practice in both primitive and advanced cultures. The course focuses on the universal components of a religious worldview which include concepts of the divine and ultimate reality, origins of the natural and social order, the human problem, dealing with evil, patterns of moral action, and ways to achieve salvation or liberation. Major theories of religion and the impact that these theories have had on society are examined. 47 contact hours.

REL 2121   RELIGION IN AMERICA

credits: 3  
This course introduces the student to the unique religious nature of American culture. It begins with indigenous religions of the North American continent and then examines the impact of various religious traditions as immigrants came to America. The course highlights the unique aspects of religion in American history, the key leaders, and the major concepts which have made religion a vital part of American life. The cultural, intellectual and political influence of religion is explored with the goal of appreciating the ongoing tensions in society that are inherent in a commitment to free religious expression. 47 contact hours.

REL 2300   WORLD RELIGIONS

credits: 3  

"G" Prerequisite: ENC 0025 or EAP 1695 or satisfactory score on the SPC placement test. This course examines the general characteristics of the major religions of the world. Topics include the nature of religion, Indigenous Religions, Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto, Christianity, Islam and New Religious Movements. Each is examined in its cultural context, how basic human concerns are addressed, the way purpose for life is defined, and the uniqueness of religious practice. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education and Enhanced World View Requirements. 47 contact hours.

REL 2300H   HONORS WORLD RELIGIONS

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: (Appropriate score on the CPT or PERT) or (acceptance into the Honors College or approval from the dean) This course the major religious traditions of the world with particular attention given to examining their origins, distinctive worldviews, and impact on culture. It stresses the continuing influence of religious convictions in the contemporary setting. Students develop critical tools for analyzing concepts of the sacred, understandings of the human condition, and the ultimate goals of each religion. They evaluate the place and purpose of ritual, symbol, myth, and belief systems in each. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education and Enhanced World View Requirements. 47 contact hours.

REL 2302   THE ABRAHAMIC RELIGIONS: A STUDY OF JUDAISM, CHRISTIANITY AND ISLAM

credits: 3  

This course is an introductory and comparative study of the three major monotheistic religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. It covers the history, main beliefs, sacred texts, God concepts, and practices of each; and then compares and contrasts them. It focuses on their major differences and examines why there has been so much conflict among them and how this has dramatically affected the geopolitical stability of the world. 47 contact hours.

REL 2464   PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: ENC 0025 or EAP 1695 or appropriate score on the SPC placement test. This course is designed to introduce students to the main topics and debates in contemporary analytic philosophy of religion. Topics to be explored include the existence and nature of God, the problem of evil, religious experience, life after death, and the relationship between rational and religious belief. Contemporary and historical arguments critically examining these and other basic religious concepts and beliefs will be studied. 47 contact hours.

REL 2955   STUDY ABROAD IN RELIGION

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: ENC 0025 or EAP 1695 or appropriate score on SPC placement test or permission of the Dean. This course, exclusively for students in the SPC Study Abroad Programs, is designed to offer topics of special interest in religion to students combined with actual travel and study on-site at one or more SPC Study Abroad program partners. Such course offerings include an examination of the influence and interrelationships of religion and culture by experiencing various expressions of religious tenets including literature, philosophy, music, art, and architecture. Specific content will vary depending on the specific study abroad program. The course includes lectures, discussions, field trips and multiple writing experiences. In addition, the course involves extensive orientation and preparation plus careful monitoring of student work and progress while studying abroad.

RET 1007   RESPIRATORY PHARMACOLOGY

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Admission to the program. This course will provide the student with general pharmacology concepts and principles in the management of client care. The knowledge and skills required for safe, effective administration of therapeutic drugs and indications and contraindications associated with drug therapy are an integral part of this course. This course introduces essential and advanced concepts of pharmacology as related to Respiratory Care. Drugs related to both maintenance and emergency care will be emphasized. Anatomy and physiology of body systems as related to drug therapy will be an integral part of this course. Various problematic states related to cardiopulmonary illness with an emphasis on drug therapy will be discussed. Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) standards of drug practice will be included. 47 contact hours.

RET 1024   FUNDAMENTALS OF RESPIRATORY CARE

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Admission to the program. This is a ten-unit course covering an orientation to Respiratory Care as a special field, physical principles, introduction to cardiopulmonary anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology, and a thorough working knowledge of basic equipment, procedures of cleaning and sterilization procedures. 47 contact hours.

RET 1264   PRINCIPLES OF MECHANICAL VENTILATION

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: RET 1024 with a grade of "C" or better. Corequisite: RET 1485. This course will include an introduction to mechanical ventilation and an overview of fundamental principles necessary in the management of critically ill patients requiring mechanical ventilation. Advanced ventilatory techniques used in the treatment of critically ill patients will also be covered. 47 contact hours.

RET 1485   CARDIOPULMONARY PHYSIOLOGY

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: RET 1024 with a grade of "C" or better. This is a course covering all aspects of normal cardiopulmonary physiology, and the effects of related systems. Topics include respiratory anatomy, mechanics of breathing, arterial blood gases, pulmonary ventilation/perfusion relationships , gas transport mechanisms of blood, neurologic control of ventilation, cardiac and renal function, and respiratory adjustments in health and disease. 47 contact hours.

RET 1874L   CLINICAL PRACTICE I

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: Admission to the program. This is a modular course covering the basic respiratory therapy procedures encountered in the student's first clinical affiliate, medical gas therapy and aerosol therapy. Laboratory experience precedes in-hospital care. 92 contact hours.

RET 1875L   CLINICAL PRACTICE II

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: RET 1874L with a grade of "C" or better. The student will refine those clinical skills introduced in Clinical Practice I. In addition, intermittent positive pressure breathing, chest physiotherapy and sustained maximal inspiratory therapy will be introduced. Laboratory experience precedes in-hospital patient care. 92 contact hours.

RET 2244   LIFE SUPPORT

credits: 1  
Prerequisite: RET 1007 with a grade of “C” or higher and current Basic Life Support (BLS) card. This course is designed to provide instruction regarding algorithms and advanced techniques involved in adult, pediatric and neonatal resuscitation. 16 contact hours.

RET 2284   ADVANCED MODALITIES AND MONITORING

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: RET 1264 with a grade of "C" or better. This course shall provide a complete review of the modalities and monitoring techniques employed in the care and evaluation of the critically ill patient. The theory and application of ventilatory devices and techniques will be covered in detail. The course will also focus on the theory and application of invasive and non-invasive monitoring of the critically ill patient. 32 contact hours.

RET 2414   DIAGNOSTIC PROCEDURES AND PULMONARY REHABILITATION

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: RET 1485 with a grade of "C" or better. This is a course designed to introduce the student to the diagnostic methods and equipment used to interpret and evaluate the status of patients. Emphasis is on diagnostic techniques used in pulmonary function studies, blood gas analysis, cardiac and pulmonary stress testing, metabolic studies, sleep studies, bronchoscopy and pulmonary rehabilitation. The student will recognize alterations from testing data, be able to interpret these alterations with respect to possible diagnosis, degrees of impairment and recommend a treatment regime. The therapeutic techniques and procedures involved in the home and rehabilitative care of the pulmonary patient will follow the presentation of diagnostic procedures. Clinical experience will occur during Clinical Practice IV. 47 contact hours.

RET 2450   CARDIOPULMONARY ASSESSMENT

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: RET 1485 with a grade of "C" or better. The integral components of data collection, assessment, and evaluation necessary for effective treatment of patients with cardiopulmonary disorders will be covered in detail in this course. Patient interview, physical examination, laboratory data review, and chest radiograph interpretation will be emphasized. 32 contact hours.

RET 2484   PULMONARY DISEASE

credits: 2  
Prerequisites: RET 1485 and BSC 2086/2086L all with grades of "C" or better. This course is an introduction to pulmonary diseases. Topics include respiratory infections, COPD, the pneumonconiosis, fibrotic disease, malignant diseases, pulmonary involvement in systemic disease and respiratory failure. Teaching methodology will include lecture, examinations, and class discussion. 32 contact hours.

RET 2714   NEONATAL-PEDIATRIC RESPIRATORY CARE

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: RET 2484 with a grade of "C" or better. This course will cover development and physiology of the fetal and neonatal lung including perinatal circulation, pulmonary function in infants, and developmental physiology of the lung. Neonatal pulmonary disorders will be overviewed and the treatment of pediatric patients with an emphasis on respiratory care techniques will be explored. 32 contact hours.

RET 2876L   CLINICAL PRACTICE III

credits: 4  
Prerequisite: RET 1875L with a grade of "C" or better. This is a modular course reviewing the principles and practice of basic respiratory care techniques. Airway care and critical respiratory care will be introduced. In addition, X-ray and EKG services will be surveyed. Laboratory practice precedes actual patient care. This course may also be taken to fulfill transitional program requirements. 272 contact hours.

RET 2877L   CLINICAL PRACTICE IV

credits: 4  
Prerequisite: RET 2876L with a grade of "C" or better. The student will continue to practice critical respiratory care. Laboratory as well as clinical introductions to cardiopulmonary testing will be included with an emphasis on pulmonary function testing and blood gases. In addition, students will rotate through surgery and the recovery room. Laboratory experience precedes in-hospital practice. 182 contact hours.

RET 2878L   CLINICAL PRACTICE V

credits: 4  
Prerequisite: RET 2877L with a grade of "C" or better. This course will continue to refine those respiratory care techniques applicable to the critically ill patient with an emphasis on prolonged mechanical ventilation. A laboratory review of the most commonly used ventilators with an emphasis on practical applications will occur. Pediatric and neonatal respiratory care rotations will be included with an emphasis on hands-on clinical practice. Refinement of pulmonary function testing and blood gases skills will be continued. 182 contact hours.

RET 2879L   CLINICAL PRACTICE VI

credits: 4  
Prerequisite: RET 2878L with a grade of "C" or better. This is the last clinical practice course with completion leading to graduation from the Respiratory Care Program. It will include pediatric and neonatal respiratory care, home respiratory care, as well as a section for review of all phases previously covered. A "C" or better must be achieved on the Clinical Practice VI Comprehensive Written Program Examination in order to complete the course of study and obtain the award of the Associate in Science in Respiratory Care. 272 contact hours.

RET 2935   MEDICAL-SURGICAL ASPECTS OF RESPIRATORY CARE

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: RET 2484 with a grade of "C" or better. The general principles of medicine and surgery as they apply to respiratory care will be presented in a series of individualized learning packages and supplemented by guest physician lectures. In addition, other topics pertinent to respiratory care will be presented including special procedures, new concepts and treatment modalities, diagnostic tests, and conditions causing impairment to the pulmonary system not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. 32 contact hours.

RET 3050   EVIDENCE BASED MEDICINE IN RESPIRATORY CARE

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: Admission to Health Services Administration BAS program; Respiratory Care Subplan and HSA 3702 with a minimum grade of C. This course focuses on statistical analyses, peer reviewed research databases, understanding systematic and meta-analysis reviews, and evidence based research in the current respiratory care literature, evidence based medicine and integrating evidence based research into practice as a respiratory therapist and health services administrator will be emphasized. 

RET 4285   ADVANCED CARDIOPULMONARY MEDICINE

credits: 4  

Prerequisite: HSA 3104 with a minimum grade of C and Admission into the HSA-BAS Program and Respiratory Care Subplan . This course focuses on the theories, concepts and principles of management of the cardiopulmonary compromised patient. Current trends in critical care medicine will be examined. 62 contact hours.

RET 4494   ADVANCED CARDIOPULMONARY PATHOPHYSIOLOGY

credits: 4  

Prerequisite: HSA 3104 with a minimum grade of C and Admission to Health Services Administration; Respiratory Care Subplan.This course explores a broad range of abnormalities in the physiologic functioning of the human cardiopulmonary system. Additional topics include the etiology, pathogenesis, and clinical manifestations of related systems to include the digestive, renal, nervous and endocrine systems. Course content prepares the credentialed Respiratory Therapist to distinguish between health and non-health of related systems 
 

RET 4715   ADVANCED NEONATAL AND PEDIATRIC RESPIRATORY CARE

credits: 4  

Prerequisite: Admission to the HSA-BAS program and Respiratory Care Subplan and HSA 3104 with a minimum grade of C. This comprehensive course focuses on advancing the knowledge of the respiratory therapy student from basic disease knowledge and treatment to innovative and novel modalities in the treatment of critically ill neonatal and pediatric respiratory patients. 62 contact hours.

RMI 1112   FUNDAMENTALS OF INSURANCE PLANNING

credits: 3  
This is an introductory course that provides an overview that covers basic insurance concepts, such as risk, operations, legal principles, government programs, and types of insurance products. 47 contact hours.

RMI 1201   PRINCIPLES OF PROPERTY AND LIABILITY INSURANCE

credits: 3  

This is an introductory course that provides an overview that covers basic property and liability insurance principles such as risk management, regulation, performance, marketing, underwriting, claims, contracts, and loss exposures. 47 contact hours.

RMI 2113   PERSONAL INSURANCE

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to Insurance Services AS program. This is the second of three courses in the Insurance Services AS program. The intent of the course is to provide an overview of personal lines insurance, including an introduction to fundamental automobile, homeowners, life, health and disability concepts, practices, and current market trends. It is strongly recommended that students complete RMI 1201 prior to taking RMI 2113. 47 contact hours. 

RMI 2213   COMMERCIAL INSURANCE

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: Admission to Insurance Services AS program and RMI 1201 with a minimum grade of C. This is the third of three courses in the AS, Insurance Services program. The intent of this course is to provide an overview of commercial lines insurance, including an introduction to fundamental property, liability, automobile, crime business income, workers compensation practices, and current market trends. It is strongly recommended that students complete RMI 2113 prior to this course. 47 contact hours. 
 

RMI 2940   INSURANCE SERVICES INTERNSHIP

credits: 1-4  
Prerequisite: Academic Department Coordinator/Chair approval. This course is to be taken after the student has completed 9 credit hours in their major field of study. The purpose of this course is to allow students a "real world" experience with major-related, supervised, evaluated practical work experiences which may be paid or voluntary. Students are graded on the basis of documented learning acquired through hands-on experiences in an actual work setting. Variable credits are available, one to four per course. The student must fulfill the requirement of 60 on-the-job hours for each credit earned in addition to written assignments. This course may be repeated for a total of 4 credits.

RMI 3117   PERSONAL INSURANCE

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Admission to the Management and Organizational Leadership BAS program or permission of the Dean. Successful completion of RMI 3200 is strongly recommended. This is the second of three courses in the Insurance Track. The intent of this course is to provide an overview of personal lines insurance, including an introduction to fundamental automobile, homeowners, life, health and disability concepts, practices, and current market trends. 47 contact hours.

RMI 3200   PRINCIPLES OF PROPERTY AND LIABILITY INSURANCE

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Admission to the Management and Organizational Leadership BAS program or permission of the Dean. This will serve as the introductory course to the Insurance Track. The intent of this course is to provide an overview of the Property and Casualty Industry, including an introduction to fundamental insurance concepts, practices, legal, regulation and financial aspects and current market trends. 47 contact hours.

RMI 4211   COMMERCIAL INSURANCE

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Admission to the Management and Organizational Leadership BAS program or permission of the Dean. Successful completion of RMI 3117 and RMI 3200 is strongly recommended. This is the third of three courses in the Insurance Track. The intent of this course is to provide an overview of commercial lines insurance, including an introduction to fundamental property, liability, automobile, crime business income, workers compensation practices, and current market trends. 47 contact hours.

RTE 1000   ORIENTATION TO RADIOGRAPHY

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiography AS program.This course provides an orientation to the profession of radiography. Topics include the history and organization of the profession, medical terminology, body mechanics, emergency situations, infection control, aseptic techniques, evaluating patient physical needs, patient education, and venipuncture in radiography. Patient care in radiography will also be included. 47 contact hours.

RTE 1418   PRINCIPLES OF IMAGING I

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: MAC 1105 with a grade of “C” or higher. Corequisite: RTE 1418L. The objective of this course is to provide an introduction to basic principles of radiographic exposure and processing. Topics include radiographic density, contrast, definition, distortion, film, latent image formation and processing. 32 contact hours.

RTE 1418L   PRINCIPLES OF IMAGING I LAB

credits: 1  
Prerequisites: Any course with a MAC or MGF prefix with a grade of "C" or higher and admission to the Radiography AS program. Corequisite: RTE 1418. This course is designed to provide the student an opportunity to apply radiographic exposure principles in the energized laboratory. Topics include radiographic density, contrast, definition, distortion, film and processing. Two laboratory hours weekly.

RTE 1458   PRINCIPLES OF IMAGING II

credits: 3  
Prerequisite: RTE 1418 with a grade of “C” or higher. Corequisite: RTE 1473L. The objective of this course is to provide advanced, comprehensive instruction and discussion in principles of radiographic exposure. Topics include detailed instruction in the control of exposure and quality using kilovoltage peak (kVp), milliampere-seconds (mAs), Source Image Distance (SID), geometric factors, automatic exposure control (AEC) devices, beam restrictors, grids, filters, and screens, properties of x-ray tubes, principles of image intensification and fluoroscopy, and the production and characteristics of radiation. Tube rating charts, technique charts and selected topics in quality assurance are included. 47 contact hours.

RTE 1473L   RADIOGRAPHIC QUALITY ASSURANCE LABORATORY

credits: 1  
Prerequisite: RTE 1418 with grade of "C" or better. Corequisite: RTE 1458. This course is a laboratory course providing the student an opportunity to apply radiographic principles and accessories in the energized laboratory. Topics include radiographic density, contrast, definition, distortion, radiographic grids, filters, film, processing, beam restrictors, screens, and the application of basic principles and radiologic physics, exposure and quality assurance, quality control and quality improvement. 32 contact hours.

RTE 1503C   RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES I

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiography AS Program. This course is a study of radiographic anatomy, physiology, and positioning for radiologic examinations of the chest, abdomen, pelvis, bony thorax, spine and extremities. 62 contact hours.

RTE 1503L   RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES I LAB

credits: 1  
Corequisite: RTE 1503C. This is a laboratory study of basic anatomy and positioning of the chest, abdomen, pelvis, bony thorax, spine and extremities for radiographic procedures. 47 contact hours.

RTE 1513C   RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES II

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: RTE 1503C with a grade of "C" or higher. This course is a study of radiographic anatomy, physiology, and positioning of radiologic examinations of the skull and facial bones. Procedures requiring the use of contrast materials within the digestive system, urinary system, and other special studies as well as the pharmacology of contrast agents will also be studied. 47 contact hours.

RTE 1513L   RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES II LAB

credits: 1  
Prerequisites: RTE 1503C, RTE 1503L both with grades of "C" or better. Corequisite: RTE 1513C. This is a laboratory study of basic radiographic anatomy. The course includes the positioning of the urinary system, digestive system, breasts and cranium. 45 contact hours.

RTE 1804L   RADIOGRAPHIC CLINICAL EDUCATION I

credits: 3  
Prerequisites: RTE 1000, RTE 1503C and RTE 1418 all with grades of "C" or better. This is an introductory clinical course meeting at local hospitals to give the student an opportunity to apply theoretical concepts taught in classroom courses. Topics include basic positioning of the chest, abdomen, extremities and Gastrointestinal Series (GI )contrast examinations. Basic patient care procedures, radiation protection practices and radiologic exposure and processing principles are introduced. 227 contact hours.

RTE 1814L   RADIOGRAPHIC CLINICAL EDUCATION II

credits: 5  
Prerequisites: RTE 1804L, RTE 1513C both with grades of "C" or better. This course is a continuation of Radiographic Clinical Education I. Topics include positioning of the urinary tract, spine and basic skull exams. Intermediate-level patient care procedures, radiation protection practices, radiologic exposure principles and the use of radiographic accessories are introduced. 377 contact hours.

RTE 2385   RADIATION BIOLOGY

credits: 2  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiography AS program. The objective of this course is to provide the student with fundamental principles of radiobiology. Topics include early and late effects of radiation exposure, basic interactions of ionizing radiation with biological systems, factors modifying the body's response to radiation, principles of radiation protection and radiation monitoring. 32 contact hours.

RTE 2563   ADVANCED MEDICAL IMAGING

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: RTE 1513C with a grade of "C" or higher. This course is the study of sectional anatomy, special radiographic procedures, advanced radiologic modalities, registry review, and employability skills. Topics specifically addressed include invasive and noninvasive specialized radiographic studies, Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MR), Cardiovascular procedures (CV) and Mammography. 47 contact hours.

RTE 2571   COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

credits: 3  

Corequisite: RTE 2762. This course is offered to Radiographers currently registered and in good standing with the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) and students presently enrolled in the Radiography Program. This course is designed to facilitate highly specialized knowledge in computed tomography (CT). Specific content will include patient care, imaging procedures, physics and instrumentation. 47 contact hours.

RTE 2571L   COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY CLINICAL EDUCATION

credits: 2  

Prerequisites: RTE 2762 and RTE 2571. This course is offered to Radiographers currently registered and in good standing with the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). This computer-assisted tomography clinical course meets at local hospitals and out-patient facilities to give the student an opportunity to apply theoretical concepts to clinical situations. Topics include patient care, imaging procedures, physics and instrumentation. Approximately 8 clinical laboratory hours weekly.

RTE 2575   BASIC MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING I

credits: 2  

Corequisite: RTE 2762. This course is offered to Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists and Radiation Therapists currently registered in good standing with the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) and students presently enrolled in the Radiography Program. The course is designed to facilitate the development of highly specialized knowledge in Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Specific content areas to be studied include data acquisition and processing and physical principles of image formation. 32 contact hours.

RTE 2576   BASIC MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING II

credits: 2  

Prerequisites: RTE 2575 and RTE 2762. Corequisite: RTE 2576L. This course is offered to Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists and Radiation Therapists currently registered and in good standing with the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). This course is designed to facilitate the development of highly specialized knowledge in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Specific content areas to be studied include patient care and MRI safety and imaging procedures. 32 contact hours.

RTE 2576L   MAGNETIC RESONANCE CLINICAL EDUCATION

credits: 2  

Prerequisite: RTE 2575. Corequisite: RTE 2576. This course is offered to Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists and Radiation Therapists currently registered and in good standing with the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). This is a Magnetic Resonance Imaging clinical course meeting at local hospitals and out-patient facilities to give the student an opportunity to apply theoretical concepts taught in the didactic portion of the program to clinical situations. Topics include patient care, MRI safety, imaging procedures, data acquisition and processing and physical principles of image formation. 8 hours of clinical laboratory instruction weekly.

RTE 2582   CARDIOVASCULAR-INTERVENTIONAL PROCEDURES

credits: 3  

This course is offered to Radiographers currently registered and in good standing with the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) and students presently enrolled in the Radiography Program. This course is designed to facilitate the development of highly specialized knowledge in Cardiovascular-Interventional studies. Specific content areas to be studied include maintenance of equipment and supplies, patient care, general and specific procedural considerations. 47 contact hours.

RTE 2582L   CARDIOVASCULAR-INTERVENTIONAL CLINICAL EDUCATION

credits: 2  

Prerequisite: RTE 2582. This course is offered to Radiographers currently registered and in good standing with the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). This cardiovascular-interventional clinical education course meets at local hospitals to give the student an opportunity to apply theoretical concepts to clinical situations. Topics include patient care and monitoring, general and specific imaging procedures, and equipment instrumentation. Approximately 8 clinical laboratory hours weekly (120 total).

RTE 2584   BASIC MAMMOGRAPHY I

credits: 3  

Corequisite: RTE 2584L. This course is offered to Radiographers currently registered and in good standing with the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) and students presently enrolled in the Radiography Program. This course is designed to facilitate the development of highly specialized knowledge in Mammography. Specific content areas to be studied include patient education, instrumentation, anatomy, physiology, pathology and positioning of the breast, and mammographic techniques. 47 contact hours.

RTE 2584L   BASIC MAMMOGRAPHIC CLINICAL EDUCATION

credits: 2  

Prerequisite: RTE 2584. This course is offered to Radiographers currently registered and in good standing with the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). This mammographic clinic education course meets at local hospitals and imaging centers to give the student an opportunity to apply theoretical concepts to clinical situations. Topics include patient care and education, imaging procedures, positioning, instrumentation and applied techniques. Approximately eight clinical laboratory hours weekly.

RTE 2613   RADIATION PHYSICS

credits: 2  

Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiography AS program. The objective of this course is to introduce fundamental principles of radiologic physics including atomic and sub-atomic theory, interactions or radiation with matter, the nature of electricity and magnetism and properties of x-rays, diagnostic x-ray tubes, x-ray circuits, units of measurements and the structure of matter and the atom. 32 contact hours.

RTE 2762   CROSS-SECTIONAL ANATOMY/PATHOLOGY

credits: 2  

Corequisites: RTE 2571 and RTE 2575. This course is offered to Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists and Radiation Therapists currently registered and in good standing with the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). This course is the study of general and specific cross-sectional human anatomy and pathology as it appears in various planes on Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. 32 contact hours.

RTE 2782   RADIOGRAPHIC PATHOLOGY

credits: 2  
Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiography AS Program. The objective of this course is to introduce the disease processes most frequently encountered in the radiology department. The etiology, pathogenesis, treatment, and resolution of each disease is discussed with an attempt to relate recent advances in these areas. Emphasis is placed on radiologic diagnosis and the relationship of the radiographic appearance of the disease to its anatomic, physiologic, and pathologic characteristics. 32 contact hours.

RTE 2824L   RADIOGRAPHIC CLINICAL EDUCATION III

credits: 5  
Prerequisites: RTE 1814L, RTE 1458, RTE 1473L all with grades of "C" or better. This course is a continuation of Radiographic Clinical Education II. Topics include advanced skull exams, contrast media exams, special procedures in the radiology department, adaptation of technical factors and positioning for difficult patients, advanced radiation protection procedures, and advanced patient care techniques. 377 contact hours.

RTE 2834L   RADIOGRAPHIC CLINICAL EDUCATION IV

credits: 4  

Prerequisite: RTE 2824L with a grade of "C" or better. This course is a continuation of Radiographic Clinical Education IV. Topics include positioning of the traumatized patient, adaptation of technical factors to obtain optimum film quality, advanced specialized radiologic procedures, mobile radiography and surgical procedures. 242 contact hours.

RTE 2844L   RADIOGRAPHIC CLINICAL EDUCATION V

credits: 5  
Prerequisite: RTE 2834L with a grade of "C" or better. This course is a continuation of Radiographic Clinical Education IV. The objective of this course is to prepare the student for a career as a medical radiographer. All clinical aspects are reviewed and emphasis is placed on radiography of the difficult patient, good radiation protection practices and application of sound patient care procedures in the radiology department. 377 contact hours.

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