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Anatomy

BSC 0070   FOUNDATIONS FOR ANATOMY/PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOLOGY

credits: 2  

Prerequisites: MAT 0018 and REA 0017. This course is a study of the basic skills and concepts of biological sciences from the point of view of the college student who needs an understanding in order to help him/her prepare for college level anatomy & physiology/biology. Major topics include: basic math used in science, scientific terminology, foundational concepts of biology, chemistry and anatomy/physiology, study skills and learning strategies. 32 contact hours.

BSC 1005   BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: (ENC 0025, REA 0017 and MAT 0028) or EAP 1695 and MAT 0028. This is a survey course for students who choose a major other than science. Topics included are the scientific method, basic chemistry of life, plant and animal kingdoms, the cell, selected human systems including human reproduction and embryological development, genetics, evolution, and selected contemporary issues in biology. (This course may not be taken for credit subsequent to receiving a grade of "C" or better in BSC 2010 or BSC 2011). 47 contact hours.

BSC 1005L   BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE LAB

credits: 1  
Prerequisite or corequisite: BSC 1005. This is a laboratory experience to accompany Biological Science for students who do not intend to major in Natural Science or medical fields. The lab will emphasize basic biological concepts covering the cell, energy processes, genetics, organization of life and scientific method. 45 contact hours.

BSC 1083   HUMAN ANATOMY

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017) or EAP 1695. This course is a study of the general and specific structural anatomy of the human body. The systems approach is used, examining each major body system in detail. The systems covered include integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, sensory, reproductive, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, and urinary. 47 contact hours.

BSC 1084C   ESSENTIALS OF HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY

credits: 4  

Prerequisites: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017 and MAT 0028) or (EAP 1695 and MAT 0028) or (appropriate scores on the college placement test). This one semester combined lecture/laboratory course is a study of the general and specific structural anatomy and physiology of the human, including the requisite principles of chemistry that influence homeostasis. The systems approach is used incorporating chemical functions with human structure, from the cell to the entire organism. Each system is presented in sufficient depth to provide a comprehensive understanding of systems for students in the life and health sciences. The systems covered include integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, reproductive, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, and urinary. This course is designed for EMS Program students and is not intended for pre-nursing, pharmacy, dentistry, medicine, physician assistant, dental hygiene students or biology majors. Health program director approval is necessary for other programs. This course cannot be substituted for BSC 2085/2085L and/or BSC 2086/2086L and it may not satisfy pre-entry requirements for certain health programs. 92 contact hours.

BSC 1930   BIOLOGICAL ISSUES

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017 and MAT 0028) or (EAP 1695 and MAT 0028) or (satisfactory score on the SPC placement test.) This course is designed to allow the student an opportunity to investigate current biological issues of importance to society through lecture and discussion. Issues may include, but are not limited to, methods of science, ethical issues in science, biological impact of environmental change, genes and genomes, biodiversity and evolution, populations, ecology and conservation of species and natural habitats, sociobiology, reproductive strategies, and the biological basis of cancer, AIDS and other diseases. 47 contact hours.

BSC 2010   BIOLOGY I - CELLULAR PROCESSES

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017 and MAT 0028) or (EAP 1695 and MAT 0028) or (satisfactory scores on the SPC placement test) and CHM 1025 or one year of high school chemistry. Corequisite: BSC 2010L. The biological topics related to cells are studied in detail. These topics include molecular biology, genetics, cell types, cell structure and functions, embryology, histology, and evolution. This course is designed for science majors and to prepare the student for Biology II and must be taken in sequence. 47 contact hours.

BSC 2010L   BIOLOGY I LABORATORY

credits: 1  
Corequisite: BSC 2010. This is a laboratory experience to accompany Biology I. Laboratory exercises related to cellular biology are studied in detail and include: basic biochemistry, cell structure and function, molecular biology, embryology, and genetics. 45 contact hours.

BSC 2011   BIOLOGY II - ORGANISMS AND ECOLOGY

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: BSC 2010 with a grade of "C" or better; BSC 2010L with a grade of "C" or better. Corequisite: BSC 2011L. The biological topics related to organisms and their environment are studied in detail.  These topics include taxonomy, systematics, physiology, reproduction, ecology, and evolution. 47 contact hours.

BSC 2011L   BIOLOGY II LABORATORY

credits: 1  
Prerequisites: BSC 2010/2010L. Corequisite: BSC 2011. This is a laboratory experience to accompany Biology II. Laboratory exercises related to organisms and their environment are studied in detail and include: ecology, taxonomy, physiology, reproduction, and evolution. 45 contact hours.

BSC 2085   HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I

credits: 3  

Prerequisite: ENC 1101 with a minimum grade of “C”. Corequisite: BSC 2085L with a minimum grade of "C". This course is a study of the general and specific structural anatomy and physiology of the human, including the requisite principles of chemistry that influence homeostasis. The systems approach is used incorporating chemical functions with human structure, from the cell to the entire organism. Each system is presented in sufficient depth to provide a comprehensive understanding of systems for students in the life and health sciences. The systems covered include integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous. 47 contact hours.

BSC 2085L   HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORY I

credits: 1  
Corequisite: BSC 2085. This course is a laboratory study of the specific structure and function of the human body beginning with the cell and stressing the physical and chemical processes important in maintenance of homeostasis. The systems studied include integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous. 45 contact hours.

BSC 2086   HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II

credits: 3  
Prerequisites: BSC 2085/2085L with a minimum grade of “C”. Corequisite: BSC 2086L. This course is a continuation of Human Anatomy & Physiology I. This course is a study of the general and specific structural anatomy and physiology of the human, including the requisite principles of chemistry that influence homeostasis. The systems approach is used; incorporating chemical functions with human structure, from the cell to the entire organism. Each system is presented in sufficient depth to provide a comprehensive understanding of systems for students in the life and health sciences. The systems covered include endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic/immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive. 47 contact hours.

BSC 2086L   HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORY II

credits: 1  
Prerequisites: BSC 2085/2085L with a minimum grade of “C.” Corequisite: BSC 2086. This course is a laboratory study of the specific structure and function of the human body beginning with the cell and stressing the physical and chemical processes important in maintenance of homeostasis. The systems studied include lymphatic, endocrine, respiratory, digestive, cardiovascular, urinary, and reproductive. 45 contact hours.

BSC 2250C   FIELD BIOLOGY OF FLORIDA WITH LAB

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017 and MAT 0028) or (EAP 1695 and MAT 0028) or satisfactory score on the SPC Placement Test. This course emphasizes field-laboratory recognition and environmental relationships of the plants and animals of Florida. Lectures will emphasize basic ecological concepts while the laboratory experience will emphasize identification of representative forms of life of the various biotic communities of the Florida Suncoast. Natural and artificial biological communities will be visited. Two lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory weekly. Extensive time will be spent outdoors. Students may be expected to provide their own transportation to off-campus locations. 77 contact hours.

BSC 2362   TROPICAL ECOLOGY

credits: 3  

Prerequisites: (ENC 0025 and REA 0017 and MAT 0028) or (EAP 1695 and MAT 0028) or appropriate scores on the SPC Placement Test and consent of the instructor, or Program Director approval. This course emphasizes field recognition and observation of ecological relationships of plants and animals of the New World tropics and associated habitats. Lectures will emphasize basic ecological concepts, such as the niche concept, symbiosis, competition, trophic structure, evolutionary relationships, co-evolution and predation, with field components that will emphasize identification of representative forms of life of various tropical ecosystems in a study country located within the Neotropics. Natural and artificial biological communities will be visited. This course may not be offered every session. Contact a Natural Science Program Director for availability and duration. This course may be repeated with permission of the program director for a total of 9 credits in GPA. 47 contact hours.

BSC 2366L   NEOTROPICAL ECOLOGY LABORATORY

credits: 1  
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. This course emphasizes observation of ecological relationships of plants and animals of the New World tropics and associated habitats. The laboratory will be onsite investigations in the Neotropics (Costa Rica , Belize , Amazonia , etc.) and will emphasize basic ecological concepts, such as the niche concept, niche portioning, symbiosis, competition, trophic structure, evolutionary relationships, co-evolution and predation. In addition it will emphasize identification of representative forms of life of various tropical ecosystems in the study country located within the Neotropics. Both natural and artificial biological communities will be visited. This course may not be offered every session. Contact a Natural Science Program Director for availability and duration. This course may be repeated with permission of the program director. 45 contact hours.

BSC 2910   DIRECTED INDEPENDENT RESEARCH

credits: 1-3  

Prerequisite: Approval of Academic Chair and Dean of Natural Sciences.Students (individually or in a group) design, conduct, analyze and present biological research that is proposed by the student. A full-time professor will provide supervision and guidance. The course is intended to help students acquire skills in applying research principles and obtain practice in data collection and reporting. The research project is recommended by a full-time faculty member to the Academic Chair. Upon approval by the Academic Chair, the proposal is forwarded to the Dean, Natural Sciences for approval. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. 15 contact hours per credit hour.  

BSC 2940   BIOLOGY INTERNSHIP

credits: 1  

Prerequisite(s): Approval of the College-wide Internship Office. This course provides the student with a supervised, practical learning experience in a work setting that is relevant to his/her program of study. Through course assignments and workplace projects the student will apply, connect, and extend academic theory and competencies for the purpose of building professional skills and affiliations. 60-180 contact hours.

BSC 3017   THEORY AND PRACTICE IN THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

credits: 2  

Prerequisite(s): BSC 2010/2010L and BSC 2011/2011L. This course is designed to provide a rigorous look at the process of biologically relevant scientific inquiry. Students will investigate formulation of scientific hypotheses, experimental design, collection of data, and dissemination of results. In-depth understanding and use of scientific literature will be developed and applied to both written and verbal communication exercises. This course will include challenges faced by scientists including scientific bias, dissemination to general public and incorporation of scientific discoveries into policy. It is recommended that this course be taken the first semester within the BS Biology program. 32 contact hours.

BSC 3052   CONSERVATION BIOLOGY

credits: 3  

Prerequisite(s): BSC 2010/2010L, BSC 2011/2011L and PCB 3043C. This course is designed to teach the conceptual foundations of conservation biology, including the value of biodiversity and trends in global biodiversity. We will also explore the threats and challenges to conserving earth’s biodiversity. One of the aims is to correlate concepts from ecology and evolutionary biology to the field of conservation biology. This course will explore the wide variety of approaches used in solving problems in conservation biology and the interrelationships between conservation, human societies and public policy. STA 2023 is strongly recommended. 47 contact hours.

BSC 3096   HUMAN BIOLOGY

credits: 3  
Prerequisites: BSC 2010/2010L and BSC 2011/2011L. This course is designed to teach human biology from the perspective of the human organism's structure and function, health and wellness, and interactions with the social and physical environment. 47 contact hours.

BSC 3312C   MARINE BIOLOGY WITH LAB

credits: 4  

Prerequisites: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011 and BSC 2011L. The major emphasis of this course focuses on the evolution, biodiversity and classification of organisms in the marine environment, including characteristics and systematics of each taxonomic group.  Discussion of major habitats in the marine environment will include physical characteristics of the environment and the unique morphological, physiological, ecological and behavioral adaptations of organisms to those habitats. This course is a combined lecture and lab class.  92 contact hours.

BSC 3930L   SELECTED LAP TOPICS IN BIOLOGY

credits: 1  

Prerequisite: Permission of the Academic Department Chair or Dean. This course is designed to provide a laboratory experience to supplement lecture courses in biology for students who transfer from other institutions having completed only the lecture component. This course may be taken 5 times for a total of 5 credits using different lab topics. 45 contact hours.

BSC 4032   ISSUES AND CHALLENGES IN SCIENCE EDUCATION

credits: 2  

Admission to the Middle Grades General Science Education (5-9) or Secondary Science/Biology Education (6-12) programs. This course is designed to address the challenge of transforming Florida State Standards into a cohesive plan for instruction in middle school and secondary science classrooms. Activities in this course will strengthen the student’s ability to plan for scaffolding and articulation of content lessons and student activities and assessment. Topics addressed include the history of science curriculum reform, the impact of public policy on teaching and assessment, and instructional strategies that promote high student achievement. Students will explore the use of controversy in the classroom as a means of increasing engagement and interest in the classroom. This course addresses specific pedagogy pertinent to science education and required for certification. 32 contact hours.

BSC 4422C   METHODS AND APPLICATIONS IN BIOTECHNOLOGY

credits: 4  

Prerequisite(s): BSC 2010/2010L, BSC 2011/2011L, CHM 2045/2045L, CHM 2046/2046L and PCB 3063C; MCB 3020C or PCB3023C are recommended. This course focuses on the techniques and applications of biotechnology. Biotechnology refers to utilization and manipulation of biological systems with the intent to solve global and societal problems. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the role of the biotechnology industry and application of concepts and techniques central to biotech laboratory research. The major areas of biotechnology that will be covered are as follows:

1)  Discovery, development and use of recombinant DNA technology.
2)  Industry and government regulations on biotech as well as ethical issues surrounding the field.
3)  Major branches of the biotechnology industry including forensics, bioinformatics, pharmaceutical/medical, agricultural, environmental and sustainable energy biotechnology.

These topics will be covered in context of a clear knowledge of cellular systems, genetics and ecology as well as with rigorous application of the scientific method. This includes careful analysis of the costs and benefits of modern technology on the economy, society and the environment. This course is a combined lecture and lab class. 92 contact hours.

BSC 4905C   UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH IN BIOLOGY

credits: 1-6  
Prerequisite: Permission of Academic Department Chair or Dean. This course is an individualized independent study whereby the student designs, conducts, analyzes and presents biological research that is proposed by the student. The professor will provide advanced learning resources and guidance. The student will also meet regularly with the professor who will coordinate the experience. The number of credits is variable and will be determined by the scope of the proposed project. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours to be applied to the Biology major. 15 contact hours per credit hour.

BSC 4931   SENIOR SEMINAR IN BIOLOGY

credits: 1  

Prerequisite(s): Permission of Academic Department Chair or Dean. This course is designed to provide transition for biology students as they complete their Bachelor degrees and plan to enter the workforce and/or graduate or professional schools. Students in this course will present a compilation of research projects developed throughout their program of study. This course will also present opportunities for discussion with biology faculty and students regarding current biological research and bio-ethical concerns. 17 contact hours.

BSC 4940   INTERNSHIP BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE

credits: 1  

Prerequisite(s): Approval of the College-wide Internship Office. This course provides the student with a supervised, practical learning experience in a work setting that is relevant to his/her program of study. Through course assignments and workplace projects the student will apply, connect, and extend academic theory and competencies for the purpose of building professional skills and affiliations. 60-180 contact hours.


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