Professional Development - Critical Thinking Institutes

2013 2012 2011

-Spring Critical Thinking Institute (Dr. McGuire)

-Critical Thinking Retreat
-Spring Critical Thinking Institute (Dr. Ross)
-Fall Critical Thinking Institute
-Critical Thinking Retreat
-Spring Critical Thinking Institute (Dr. Good)
-Fall Critical Thinking Institute
2010 2009 2008

-Retreat for Academic Roundtables
-Spring Critical Thinking Institute (Dr. Stein)
-
Dr. Milton Cox
-Critical Thinking Institute for Teaching & Learning (Dr. Kohrs)

-Retreat for Academic Roundtables
-Spring Critical Thinking Institute (Dr. Sousa)
-Fall Critical Thinking Institute
-Spring Critical Thinking Institute (Drs. Fink & Nosich)
-Summer Critical Thinking Institute
-Fall Critical Thinking Institute

Spring Critical Thinking Institute & Narrowing the Gulf Conference 2013

St. Petersburg College's Critical Thinking Institute and the Florida Association of Higher Education and Disability (FL-AHEAD) presented the 14th Annual Narrowing the Gulf Conference for Unerrepresented Students in Postsecondary Education on Thursday, April 4 and Friday, April 5, 2013 at the EpiCenter. See: Conference Brochure and Program.

Opening Keynote Address
Narrow the Gulf by Developing Critical Thinking Skills:
Metacognition is the Key!

Dr. Saundra McGuire

Dr. Saundra Yancy McGuire is Assistant Vice Chancellor and Professor of Chemistry at Louisiana State University. She served as the director of LSU's nationally recognized campus-wide learning center, The Center for Academic Success, from 1999 to 2009. Prior to joining LSU in August, 1999, McGuire spent eleven years at Cornell University, where she received the highly coveted Clark Distinguished Teaching Award.

In 2012 Dr. McGuire was elected a fellow of The Council of Learning Assistance and Developmental Education Associations (CLADEA), and in 2011 she was named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). In 2010, she was named a Fellow of the American Chemical Society, and also became one of only seven individuals in the Nation to achieve Level Four Lifetime Learning Center Leadership Certification through the National College Learning Center Association (NCLCA). In November 2007 the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring (PAESMEM) was presented to her in a White House Oval Office Ceremony.

Dr. McGuire received her B.S. degree, magna cum laude, from Southern University in Baton Rouge, LA, her Master's degree from Cornell University, and her Ph.D. from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, where she received the Chancellor's Citation for Exceptional Professional Promise.

Presentations:

Critical Thinking Poster

Break-out sessions focused on critical thinking:

Teaching the Scientific Method as a Critical Thinking Tool
Monica Lara
Associate Professor,
Natural Science

The Scientific method is a set of steps used by scientists to conduct and analyze research topics. The components can be broken down and taught as individual exercises each of which involves employing critical thinking skills. I will present some of these exercises and ideas that I have used with success in my courses. Many of these can continue to be more fully developed in upper division classes and in undergraduate research courses, labs or club activities. These exercises are presented to serve as seeds for thought to promote these skills in other courses and to demonstrate how they can be incorporated into existing courses and programs.

Intellectual Virtues and Vices and the Tools of the Lazy Mind
Dave Monroe
QEC Faculty Chair & North County Lead Faculty, Applied Ethics

Christy Powers
Instructor in Charge, Paralegal Studies

Participants in this session will discuss a range of intellectual dispositions that partially constitute being a critical thinker, as well as some that do not. Critical Thinking instruction often focuses on developing the "right" intellectual traits and how using correct reasoning skills propels that development. In this session, participants will consider an alternate perspective--that is, a consideration of how incorrect reasoning, particularly informal fallacies, propagates intellectual vices. Presentation

Not Quite a Lecture: Keeping Students Engaged
Ginny Price
Professor, Veterinary Technology

This presentation allows participants to get brief tastes of a variety of strategies used to get students to prepare for class (actively read and take notes), be engaged in class (discussions and activities), think deeply about the course material and be able to apply what they learn. Presentation

Instructional Portfolios for Critical Thinking
Janice Thiel
Director, Quality Enhancement Plan
Faculty Champions - Jim Rutledge, Mathematics; Cynthia Grey, Veterinary Technology BAS; Larry Goldsmith, Hospitality/Parks/Career Life; Christine Patel, Dental Hygiene; Shirley Collar, Health Information Management; Michael Earle, Student Life Skills

Faculty members at St. Petersburg College have engaged in the scholarship of teaching and learning as they have focused on teaching for critical thinking. Evidence of their hard work is compiled in Instructional Portfolios for Critical Thinking. In this session, Faculty Champions will share their reflections on the process and impact on student learning. See: Instructional Portfolios

Jim Rutledge, Mathematics

Cynthia Grey, Veterinary Technology BAS

Christine Patel, Dental Hygiene

Larry Goldsmith, Hospitality/Parks/Career Life

Shirley Collar, Health Information Management

Michael Earle, Student Life Skills

How Can "Learning Support" Tools Enhance Critical Thinking in Online Courses?
Eric Carver
CETL Lead Faculty Associate
This presentation will show how to integrate "Learning Support" folders to provoke critical thinking for specific assignments or for weekly assigned coursework in an online, blended, or face to face environment. This method demonstrates and organized approach to integrating specific resources to explore the depth and breadth of a particular subject.  
Critical Thinking: Taking Baby Steps
Jennifer Haber
Professor, Communications
Critical thinking needs to be purposefully used in all classes--from remedial to college-level classes, and this presentation will give some specific strategies and activities to help faculty members engage students in critical thinking in their classrooms.

Presentation

Critical Reading Assignment

Paraphrasing Exercise

What in the "WORLD"?: Examining Various Forms of Text through the Critical Mind
Matthew Bodie
QEC Faculty Chair & Team Leader, Learning Resources
Cher Gauweiler
Professor, College of Education

In this interactive session, presenters will share current theories on various literacies (e.g., visual, digital, and cultural). Participants will examine how to implement specific strategies to engage their students in the content as well as increase their critical thinking skills. Presentation
Effective Strategies for Improving Students' Critical Thinking Skills Using Online Video
Alan Shapiro, Karen Hesting, Tim Godcharles, Karen Fritch, & Nancy Munce
Instructional Design Technologists
Online Video has come of age and with it has come seemingly endless resources for teaching and learning. Up until the recent past, video was considered a supplement to traditional teaching materials such as textbooks and lectures. With the advent of increased access to broadband technology, the barriers to using online video have been greatly reduced. The new challenge is that of how to increase students' ability to effectively process and evaluate the information received while watching a video. This session will focus on various resources available to faculty and how they can be used for Critical Thinking.

Presentation

Handout

Jumping into the Deep End: Using Immersive Simulations for Problem-based Learning
Lynn Grinnell
Professor, College of Business
Karen Fritch
Instructional Design Technologist

What is an immersive simulation? What benefits can be derived from using a real-time, immersive simulation for problem-solving activities? What are the issues? Through a CETL grant, two pilots provided some of the answers to these questions. Join us to experience the fun and frustration involved in creating Eco-Village, a Second Life location where students can engage in creating community and building sustainable businesses. Presentation

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Fall Critical Thinking Institute for Teaching & Learning 2012

Date
Friday, October 5, 2012
Time
8:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Location
Seminole Campus, Directions
Review: Full Agenda

Faculty contestants earned prizes while testing their knowledge of the elements of critical thinking during the lively "Wheel of Thinking" game show at the fifth annual Fall Critical Thinking Institute held at the Seminole Campus October 5. More than 120 faculty and staff attended the event which was co-sponsored by the Center of Excellence for Teaching and Learning (CETL) and the Critical Thinking (CT) Initiative.

Li-Lee Tunceren, CETL Lead Faculty Associate reprised her rap-artist talent by kicking off the morning with a fun, yet inspiring message that emphasized the importance of taking time to reflect and focus on faculty development. The opening session featured the CETL-CT "bridge team" faculty: Dave Monroe, Applied Ethics North County Lead Faculty; Andrea Kelly, College of Education; Jennifer Haber, Communications; and Eric Carver, Health Informatics/Ethics. During break-out sessions the team detailed strategies they gleaned from July's International Conference for Critical Thinking that included:

  • How to improve critical thinking in your online classes
  • Engaging students in the research process
  • Critical thinking about affective issues as it relates to student motivation
  • Critical thinking model for ethical decision-making

Additional break-out sessions were presented by recipients of CETL Critical Thinking Grants: Sheree Greer, Communications; Julia Rawa, Letters; and Joseph Smith, SE Public Safety Institute. And, Susan Blanchard, College of Education, demonstrated some of the thinking routines as outlined in Making Thinking Visible: How to Promote Engagement, Understanding, and Independence for All Learners by Harvard University Project Zero researchers. The afternoon concluded with a WITS Learning Event on Developing Critical Thinking Activities Using Reusable Learning Objects.

Critical Thinking Poster

Attendees received this 11X17 poster

Opening General Session

Join us for a game of Wheel of Thinking! Contestants could win fabulous prizes, including an all-expense paid trip! This fun and interactive game show will highlight dimensions of the Paul & Elder critical thinking model. Don't miss out on your chance at prizes! The opening session concludes with presenters sharing pedagogical takeaways from the International Conference on Critical Thinking held in July.

Eric Carver, DHSc.
Health Informatics/Ethics

Jennifer Haber, Ph.D.
Communications

Andrea Kelly, Ph.D.
College of Education

Dave Monroe
North County Lead Faculty, Applied Ethics &
QEC Faculty Chair

Spinning WheelWheel of Thinking Game Show

Break-Out Sessions

"What Was I Thinking" Workshop in Progress: Focused Decision-Making and Reflective Goal-Setting for Students
Professor Sheree Greer, Communications

The "What Was I Thinking" Workshop is moving steadily ahead on the Seminole campus and focuses on critical thinking, reflection, and goal-setting as a means to understanding what went into the decision to attend college, developing a plan to finish what was started, and changing the way students approach decision-making and goal-setting going forward. This session will discuss the on-going outcomes of the workshop so far and why we should find ways to incorporate these ideas into our service to students.

Presentation
Sample Assessment 1
Sample Assessment 2

How to Improve Critical Thinking in Your Online Classes
Eric Carver, DHSc.,
Health Informatics/Ethics

This forum will illustrate how to use a critical thinking strategy entitled "SEEI" to improve Critical Thinking within your online classes. Also, Dr. Carver will show you how to organize content in ANGEL to support the process.

Eric Carver

Engaging Students in the Research Process
Jennifer Haber, Ph.D.,
Communications

This presentation will show faculty members how to engage students in the research process using a six-module approach. The modules will include using critical thinking and reading skills, understanding the library and tools, deciding on a style (MLA or APA), understanding audience and adapting to different audiences, and using different writing approaches (formal and informal). This approach can be adapted into any class requiring a research project or paper.

Jennifer Haber

Critical Thinking about Affective Issues as it Relates to Student Motivation
Andrea Kelly, Ph.D.,
College of Education

In this session we will examine the ways that helping students to think critically about affective issues (that impede their academic success) can motivate students and promote engagement in the classroom across disciplines.

Presentation

Andrea Kelly

The SPC Critical Thinking Model for Ethical Decision-Making
Dave Monroe, North County Lead Faculty, Applied Ethics & QEC Faculty Chair

Participants in this collaborative workshop will learn the SPC Critical Thinking Model for ethical decision-making by using the model to solve a hypothetical moral quandary. Further discussion will aim toward integrating the model as a tool for other disciplines.

David Monroe

Making Thinking Visible Through Classroom Routines
Sue Blanchard, Ph.D.,
College of Education

Want to make critical thinking a natural part of your classroom? Need to see some "Thinking Routines" that can be used to encourage your students to think critically about your materials? We will share hands on routines that can be used in any content area to structure critical thinking into your in class or online learning. Participants will leave with a list of possible activities/approaches to try in a college classroom. According to Harvard's Project Zero, "..teachers who are successful at promoting students' thinking tend to develop, adapt, and make use of specific routines to scaffold and support students' thinking." (Ritchhart, 2002) Come get some examples of these routines!

Presentation

Handout

Making Thinking Visible Book Cover

The META Project: Teaching & Learning Interdisciplinarity in the 21st Century
Dr. Julia Rawa-White, Professor, Letters & Interdisciplinary Studies
Dr. Nadia Yevstigneva,
Director, Honors College

Multimedia presentation and related discussion about the interdisciplinary quest for knowledge and CETL grant-funded Digital Interdisciplinary Project (IDSDHC). The project emphasizes IDS strategies and provides such strategies with expansive forums. The CETL funded Digital Interdisciplinary Project (IDSDHC) is energizing and motivating undergraduate critical thinking, critical writing, and research-scholarship via IDSDHC Writing & Research Seminars. We shall discuss our upcoming Writing & Research Seminars for undergraduates at the Seminole Campus in November and the Clearwater Campus in December. We shall also showcase our META IDS PROJECT (an interrelated digital humanities initiative focused on faculty interdisciplinarity). There shall be emphasis on the genesis, development, and reach of this project in multiple mediums. There shall also be discourse about strategies for involving faculty and undergraduates in interdisciplinary communities and projects.

IDS Assessment

IDS Resources

Seminole Symposia

Clearwater Symposia

IDS Bibliography

IDS Learning Outcomes

Julia Rawa

Critical Thinking as it Applies to Law Enforcement (Recruits)
Joseph L. Smith
Coordinator, SE Public Safety Institute

This project is a presentation of information on progress of research utilizing the problem solving framework Scanning, Analysis, Response, and Assessment (SARA) or the Safety, Ethics, Community, Understanding, Response, and Evaluation (SECURE) problem solving model. The projects emphasize methods using either of these models to incorporate critical thinking skills to control or prevent crime. The information provided will give insight on the teaching methods used to instruct law enforcement recruits, at the end of their training, a practical understanding of incorporating critical thinking into a problem solving model to solve law enforcement issues.

Joseph Smith

Afternoon Bonus!
1:00-4:00 – WITS Monthly Learning Event
Critical Mass: Developing Critical Thinking Activities Using Reusable Learning Objects
Seminole Campus - UP 320

Presentation

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Spring Critical Thinking Institute & Narrowing the Gulf Conference 2012

St. Petersburg College's Critical Thinking Institute and the Florida Association of Higher Education and Disability (FL-AHEAD) presented the 13th Annual Narrowing the Gulf Conference for Unerrepresented Students in Postsecondary Education on Thursday, March 29 and Friday, March 30 at the EpiCenter. See: Conference Brochure and Conference Program.

Opening Keynote Address:
Dr. Edna Ross

Dr. Ross received her Ph.D. in experimental psychology from Kent State University. She has been with the University of Louisville since 1984 and is an Associate Professor of Psychology with specializations in learning and cognitive psychology. She co-teaches one of the largest and most popular undergraduate courses at U of L in two sections of Introduction to Psychology with total course enrollments of 600-700 students each semester.

Dr. Ross has received several awards for teaching and student involvement from the University of Louisville including the College of Arts and Sciences' Distinguished Teaching Award, the Delphi Center for Teaching and Learning's Faculty Favorite Award, the Black Faculty and Staff Faculty Recognition Award, and the Porter Scholars' Outstanding Faculty Recognition Award. Dr. Ross is regularly honored as a Red and Black Faculty Mentor by an athlete who has maintained a 3.25 culmative gpa and has recognized Dr. Ross as the faculty who has most inspired him or her to excel in the classroom.

Dr. Edna Ross

In addition to her faculty role at the University of Louisville, Dr. Ross has a joint appointment with the Delphi Center for Teaching and learning as the Specialist for Critical Thinking. In this capacity, she serves on the university's re-accreditation QEP team and is responsible for providing faculty development programming and training to university faculty on incorporating critical thinking activities into their courses.

Dr. Ross continually strives to introduce and foster the effective use of instructional technology in her classes and serves as Chair of the University Instructional Technology Committee and the Chair of the College of Arts and Sciences' Technology and Facilities Committee.

Dr. Ross is a regular contributor to the top psychology textbooks in the field and gives several invited talks each year on topics ranging from diversity issues to using instructional technologies to infuse critical thinking skills into the classroom.

Keynote Presentation:

Developing Students' Metacognitive Processes: Improving Student Learning and Critical Thinking Skills in Underrepresented Student Populations

Metacognition has become a new educational 'buzzword,' the development of which promises to assist students in improving their academic performance and honing their critical thinking skills.What is metacognition and how does this concept align with improving student learning and promoting critical thinking? What are factors that enhance effective metacogitive skill development in our students? What are factors that help promote unintentional triggering of stereotype threat and external locus of control--processes that hinder metacognition, especially in underrepresented student groups? During this session, participants will be engaged in clearly defining and discussing the relevance of metacognition in improving student learning outcomes while engaging and working with concepts of metacognition and critical reflection. In addition, faculty will explore the concepts of specific psychological 'triggers' that may work against the development of student-centered, self-regulation strategies.

Presentation

Concurrent Session:

Tips and Strategies to help students develop and hone their metacognitive and critical thinking skills

This concurrent session is designed to complement the keynote address. This interactive session will assist faculty in incorporating student-centered, self-regulation strategies into their instruction. The session is also designed to help faculty facilitate student awareness of their own learning processes in order to enhance student learning and long-term retention of course content. During this interactive session, participants will be given the opportunity to explore specific strategies designed to infuse metacognitive instruction into their course structures.

Break-out sessions focused on critical thinking:

Eight Strategies for Bringing a Higher Level of Thinking to Career Education
Larry Goldsmith
CWDP, P.E.T., Faculty Champion Instructor-in-Charge Parks and Leisure Services

This presentation highlights critical thinking strategies that lead to better career choices and more informed job search decisions. In this session, participants will learn approaches that they can undertake quickly to become more effective educators, advisors and guidance counselors. Attendees will walk away with techniques and actions that can be integrated immediately to improve their students' career and search successes.

Presentation

Five Common Communication Mistakes that Educators Make and How to Correct Them
Rich Mercadante
Professor, Communications
No matter where we work on a college campus we encounter daily opportunities to use good communication skills. Unfortunately, a number of factors work against us. Some of those factors cannot be controlled., for example, difficult students or colleagues. What we can control are the choices we make when we communicate. This presentation identifies five common communication mistakes that educators make and offers some research-based solutions from the field of communication studies.

Presentation

Humor as a Pedagogical Method for Critical Thinking
Dave Monroe
QEC Faculty Chair & Professor of Applied Ethics
In this session the presenter will argue for the pedagogical use of humor in teaching critical thinking. He will briefly discuss incongruity theory, a major contemporary philosophical position about humor and highlight the notion of incongruity and its propensity to generate thoughtful reflection. He will then suggest that a humorous approach to critical thinking can benefit both the instructor and students. The session will close with a discussion of ways to integrate humor into the critical thinking elements of a course.
Outline
Powerful Partnerships: Student Life & Leadership Collaboration with Faculty to Engage Critical Thinking in Underrepresented Students
Erin Senack-Daum
Coordinator, Student Life & Leadership, Tarpon Springs Adjunct Faculty, Communications
In this session, we will discuss the exciting ways in which Student Life & Leadership works in partnership with faculty to create powerful learning opportunities for our underrepresented students outside of the classroom. In order to better understand the educational role of Student Life & Leadership, the principles of good practice for Student Affairs will be shared. These principles include engaging students in active learning and forging educational partnerships that advance student learning. We will share, in a fun and informative format, concrete examples and future ideas for challenging our students to thrive inside and beyond the classroom. Presentation
Critical Thinking Tools
Ginny Price
Professor, Veterinary Technology
Critical Thinking strategies along with three specific critical thinking tools will be discussed. Attendees will practice using these tools individually and as a group to mimic classroom use.

Presentation

Foundation for Critical Thinking

Brain Rules

Reimagining Critical Thinking in the Digital Age
Matthew Bodie
Team Leader, Learning Resources
Cher Gauweiler
Professor, College of Education
Since the early twentieth century, sociolinguists and related theoreticians have given deeper meaning to the word text and have gradually changed our view of reading as one that not only deciphers words on the printed page, but one that involves reading messages and signals, ranging originally from individual gestures and community traditions to today's vast array of media technologies. As methods of communication have advanced, so has the need for closer reading and deeper thinking. How can students be more engaged in reading the world when they only think in 140 characters? In this interactive presentation, participants will explore how to infuse critical thinking strategies with multiple forms of media.

Presentation

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Critical Thinking Retreat 2012

Critical Thinking Retreat

 

The fourth annual retreat for faculty focusing on critical thinking was held on Friday, February 17 at the Natural Habitat Park & Environmental Center at the Seminole Campus. The event was conducted in partnership with the Center of Excellence for Teaching and Learning, and was attended by 55 faculty members and staff interested in improving learning for our students. The day was devoted to taking a closer look at assessing critical thinking, conducting action research and authentic assessment, exploring interdisciplinary teaching, implementing instructional technology, and encouraging student reflection. There was also a presentation about SPC's Research Committee, and information was provided about the CETL Critical Thinking Grants.

2012 Critical Thinking Retreat Agenda (pdf)

Welcome
Jim Olliver, Seminole Campus Provost
Matthew Bodie & David Monroe, Quality Enhancement Committee Faculty Co-Chairs Get Adobe Flash player

Critical Thinking Assessment
Ashley Hendrickson, Baccalaureate Assessment & Accreditation Coordinator
Presentation
Get Adobe Flash player

Action Research & Authentic Assessment
Cher Gauweiler, College of Education Professor
Presentation
Get Adobe Flash player

Interdisciplinary Teaching
Nadia Yevstigneyeva, Honors College Director
Julia Rawa, English Professor
Richard Mercadante, Communications Professor Get Adobe Flash player

Instructional Technology
Karen Hesting & Tim Godcharles, Instructional Design Technologists
Presentation
WITS Blog: www.spcollege.edu/wits
Learning Posts: www.spcollege.edu/wits/?page_id=793 Get Adobe Flash player

Reflection
Lynn Grinnell, Business Professor
Presentation
Get Adobe Flash player

SPC Research Committee
Daniel Gardner, Institutional Research & Reporting Coordinator
Beth Carlson, Sign Language Professor
Deedee Watts, Nursing Professor
Carol Weideman, Math Professor
Presentation
Conducting Research at SPC: www.spcollege.edu/central/AE/Research Get Adobe Flash player

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Fall Critical Thinking Institute for Teaching & Learning 2011

Date
Friday, September 23, 2011

Time
8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Location
Clearwater Campus, Directions
Arts Auditorium & NM Building, Campus Map

Review: Full Agenda

Clearwater Arts Auditorium

A new attendance record was set with more than 150 faculty, staff, and students attending the Fall Critical Thinking Institute at the Clearwater Campus September 23. The Center of Excellence for Teaching and Learning (CETL) and the Critical Thinking (CT) Initiative co-sponsored the event. The opening session featured faculty of the CETL-CT "bridge" team: Cher Gauweiler, College of Education; Bill Hemme, Mathematics; Ginny Price, Veterinary Technology; and Matthew Bodie, Library. The team was formed to continue the momentum and sustain critical thinking efforts beyond 2012 when the current Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) comes to its conclusion, and they shared strategies outlined at the International Conference for Critical Thinking held in July. These included: exploring inferences and assumptions, identifying fundamental and powerful concepts, and modeling and being explicit. The institute kicked-off with a performance by the MIRA Laptop and Electronic Arts Ensemble under the direction of Fine and Applied Arts Professor Jeff Donovick, followed by a welcome by Clearwater Campus Provost Stan Vittetoe. CETL Lead Faculty Associate, Li-Lee Tunceren, and QEP Director, Janice Thiel presented, as well. The opening session was followed by a variety of break-outs, and the day concluded with sessions aimed at collecting discipline-specific critical thinking strategies.

Institute attendees received a copy of the Aspiring Thinker's Guide from the Foundation for Critical Thinking.

Schedule:
8:30-9:00 – Morning Munchie
9:00-10:30 – Opening Session with Plenary
10:30-10:45 – Break
10:45-11:45 – 1st Break-Out Sessions
11:45-12:45 – Lunch ($6.50 Boxed Lunch or brown-bag-it)
12:45-1:45 – 2nd Break-Out Sessions
1:45-2:00 – Break
2:00-3:00 – Discipline-Specific Discussions

Opening Session:

Clearwater Campus Provost Dr. Stan Vittetoe welcomed attendees and the opening session featured a performance by the MIRA Laptop and Electronic Arts Ensemble (MIRA – LEA) under the direction of Jeff Donovick, Professor, Fine & Applied Arts.

Plenary Session:

Matthew Bodie
Team Leader, Learning Resources

Cher Gauweiler
Professor, College of Education

Bill Hemme
Professor, Mathematics

Ginny Price
Professor, Veterinary Technology

Through music, video, and drama, take a tour through how critical thinking manifests in the college classroom. In this interactive presentation, participants will apply concepts from the critical thinking wheel to explore their inferences and assumptions. In addition, participants will learn how to make critical thinking concepts in their field more explicit for their students.

Break-Out Sessions:

How do I get them to think?
Gail O. Lancaster, Ph.D. Team Leader, Learning Resources
Professor George M. Greenlee, Economics/Social and Behavioral Sciences
Larry Goldsmith, CWDP, P.E.T., Faculty Champion Instructor-in-Charge Parks and Leisure Services

Everyone knows that it is imperative for students to think critically, but how, exactly, do we get them to do that? This highly interactive presentation models 10 strategies that engage students and make them eager to think critically about subject content. This will include the Socratic method that helps students arrive at solutions and answers by asking questions that will allow them to use deductive reasoning. You will learn how critical thinking changes teaching and learning in the classroom.

Presentation

Goldsmith Handout

Reading and Writing Critically Across the Curriculum
Diane Reese, Ph.D. (Communications), Sharon Williams, Ph.D. (Communications & Faculty Associate, CETL), and Lillien Tunceren (Communications & Lead Faculty Associate, CETL)

Want to use "immediate" strategies to engage students in reading and writing critically within your discipline? This hands-on session will engage faculty members in any discipline while modeling effective learning strategies as powerful tools to engage students in thinking metacognitively! Come on . . . let's kick it up a notch! "Despite American higher education's success at providing collegiate education for an unprecedented number of people, the vision of equipping ALL students with learning deep enough to meet the challenges of the post-industrial age provides us with a powerful incentive to do our work better." Powerful Partnerships: A Shared Responsibility for Learning

Handouts


Critical Thinking in the Humanities
Brandy Stark, Mark Lulek, Tim Wolter, Matthew Sims

The Humanities studies the human condition through analytical, critical and/or speculative thinking. This necessitates an interactive critical thinking experience for students. Utilizing the community-oriented aspect of St. Petersburg College, the Academic Roundtable for Humanities has created an interactive Museum field trip project to work with students.

Presentation

Critical Thinking in the Humanities

Five Alive! A Critical Thinking Pilot Program for Mathematics
Professor James Rutledge, Mathematics; Professor Carol Weideman, Mathematics

Five Alive! presents basic critical thinking skills that are especially relevant to mathematics courses via a series of five-minute teaching/learning scenarios, related critical thinking assignments, opportunities for student presentation, and certificate of achievement awards. The program was piloted in MGF 1106 and MGF 1107 during Summer, 2011. Experiences and results will be shared along with thought and ideas for further development. Creative input is welcomed!

Presentation

Five Alive! A Critical Thinking Pilot Program for Mathematics

Incorporating Critical Thinking into a Capstone Course
Nathan Heinze, Ph.D.

The College of Computer and Information Technology has been implementing critical thinking skills in the college's new Capstone course for the BAS. The course incorporates a team-based approach to problem solving in which students study cases and 1) discover and define the business problems, 2) create and analyze possible solutions, and 3) choose and defend a solution, all the while explaining in detail their reasoning behind every decision. Students also answer reflective questions as part of the project.

Incorporating Critical Thinking into a Capstone Course

Undergraduate research: Critical thinking in action
Lynn Grinnell, Professor, College of Business

Other colleges have selected "undergraduate research" for the focus of their Quality Enhancement Plan. This presentation connects undergraduate research with critical thinking through the use of a major, course-long simulation.

Presentation

Undergraduate research: Critical thinking in action

Writing Critical Thinking Scenarios with a Twist "What If"
Shirley Collar, Ph.D., RHIA and Sheila Newberry, M.Ed, RHIT Health Information Management/Coding/Informatics

This hands-on session allows participants to tweak several critical thinking scenarios by changing and or eliminating a few minor facts and adding the words "what if" therefore, resulting in a new critical thinking scenario. Adding the words "what if" will challenge students to shift their thinking to a higher level of analysis and evaluation and enhance their critical thinking skills.

Presentation

Writing Critical Thinking Scenarios with a Twist "What If"

How I Finally Got the Wheel to Turn for my Students
Professor Ginny Price, Veterinary Technology

This lecture will show my lesson progression using the wheel of the eight elements of reasoning from how I started to how I use it now. Examples of lessons and student work will be presented. Attendees will learn using critical thinking in curriculum design is a continuous process and the student learning outcome is exciting.

Presentation

How I Finally Got the Wheel to Turn for my Students

The Persistence of Casuistry: The Revival of Case-Based Reasoning
Professor Rich Mercadante Communications/Philosophy/IDS

This session offers a summary of my recent doctoral dissertation research on casuistry (case-based reasoning) as a method of critical thinking. I will explain what casuistry is and why casuistry has fallen in disrepute over the last 350 years. After a brief history of casuistry, I will explain some of the reasons why case-based reason has been discredited. I will also examine the major criticisms of casuistry and review some recent attempts to rehabilitate case-based reasoning. Finally, I will offer an explanation and several examples of how case-based reasoning might be used to increase critical thinking in the classroom.

Presentation

The Persistence of Casuistry: The Revival of Case-Based Reasoning

Lights! Camera! Critical Thinking! Effective Strategies for Improving Students' Critical Thinking Skills Using Online Video
Karen Hesting, Instructional Design Technologist
Alan Shapiro, Instructional Design Technologist

Online Video has come of age and with it has come seemingly endless resources for teaching and learning. Up until the recent past, video
was considered a supplement to traditional teaching materials such as textbooks and lectures. With the advent of increased access to
broadband technology, the barriers to using online video have been greatly reduced. The new challenge is that of how to increase students'
ability to effectively process and evaluate the information received while watching a video.

WITS Blog: www.spcollege.edu/wits/?page_id=1588

Lights! Camera! Critical Thinking! Effective Strategies for Improving Students' Critical Thinking Skills Using Online Video

Visual Rhetoric and Literacy: Critical Pedagogy in American Sign Language Instruction
Beth Carlson, Ph.D., Professor Communications/Sign Language Interpretation Program; Marika Robinson, M.A., American Sign Langauge Lab Coordinator/ASL and Deaf Culture Instructor/Sign Langauge Interpretation Program

Because of the increasing demand for sign language interpreters, a readiness–to–work gap is a concern of interpreter educators who are charged with the task of developing in students the skills of motivation, assertiveness, multi–tasking, rapid information–processing ability and confidence. Given the notion that sign language interpreting skills are evolutionary and require years of refinement, a logical beginning for educators of interpreting students is to refine current course objectives, curricula and methodology to include direct experience with developing critical thinking skills and essential characteristics that are central to the interpreting process, to consumers of interpreting services, to interpreter educators and to institutional administrators. This presentation will focus upon developing student readiness for interpreter training prior to entrance into higher level coursework. The discussion will center upon how instructors can facilitate the development of traits and skills in students that will allow them to assimilate into the culture of the deaf, take responsibility for their education, develop adequate working memory and learn to process languages efficiently.

Visual Rhetoric and Literacy: Critical Pedagogy in American Sign Language Instruction

Powerful Partnerships: How Student Life & Leadership Collaborates with Faculty to Engage Critical Thinking in Our Students
Erin Senack Coordinator, Student Life & Leadership, Tarpon Springs Adjunct Faculty, Communications

We will discuss the exciting ways in which Student Life & Leadership works in partnership with faculty to create powerful learning opportunities for our students outside of the classroom. In order to better understand the educational role of Student Life & Leadership, the principles of good practice for Student Affairs will be shared. These principles include engaging students in active learning and forging educational partnerships that advance student learning. We will share, in a fun and informative format, concrete examples and future ideas for challenging our students to thrive inside and beyond the classroom.

Presentation

Powerful Partnerships: How Student Life & Leadership Collaborates with Faculty to Engage Critical Thinking in Our Students

Discipline-Specific Discussions:

The purpose of these discussions is to determine specific strategies to teach for critical thinking within that discipline. You can review the strategies identified by each group via: spccriticalthinking.posterous.com

Arts & Humanities

Arts & Humanities
Facilitated by Brandy Stark

Critical Thinking Strategies

Communications

Communications
Facilitated by Bonnie Jefferis

Critical Thinking Strategies

Mathematics

Mathematics
Facilitated by Jim Rutledge and Carol Weideman

Critical Thinking Strategies

Science

Science
Facilitated by Pat Barbier and Monica Lara

Critical Thinking Strategies

Social & Behavioral Sciences (Human Services, Student Life Skills)
Facilitated by George Greenlee and Roy Slater

Critical Thinking Strategies

Computers & Technology

Computers & Technology (Engineering Technology)
Facilitated by Nathan Heinze and Darlene Westberg

Critical Thinking Strategies

Business, Finance, Management

Business, Finance, Management (Parks & Leisure Services, Hospitality & Tourism Management)
Facilitated by Lynn Grinnell

Critical Thinking Strategies

Law & Public Safety

Law & Public Safety (Emergency Medical Services, Public Safety Administration, Paralegal Studies, Ethics)
Facilitated by Christy Powers

Critical Thinking Strategies

Health Sciences

Health Sciences (Health Information Management, Dental Hygiene, Orthotics & Prosthetics, Physical Therapist Assistant, Respiratory Care Radiography, Nursing, Medical Laboratory Technology, Funeral Services, Veterinary Technology)
Facilitated by Steven Hardt

Critical Thinking Strategies

 

Education (Early Childhood, Sign Language Interpretation, Library)
Facilitated by Tim Godcharles

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Spring Critical Thinking Institute & Narrowing the Gulf Conference 2011

2011 Spring Critical Thinking Institute Banner

The Spring Critical Thinking Institute was held in conjunction with the twelfth annual Narrowing the Gulf Conference on March 31 and April 1 at the EpiCenter. About 180 people attended. Conference Program

Opening Keynote Address:
Dr. Johnny Good

Johnny Good, Ed.D., Professor Emeritus at Beacon College, was the keynote speaker at the Opening General Session. He spoke of his own triumphs as an individual with a learning disability, the difficulties students with learning disabilities face in their pursuit of a quality education and the role that using good critical thinking skills plays in reaching one’s educational goals and potential in life.

Later, Dr. Good met with the QEP Faculty Champions focusing on the critical thinking initiative and shared his experience with garnering college-wide implementation of critical thinking strategies.

www.LDCriticalthinking.com

Dr. Johnny Good

Break-out sessions focused on critical thinking:

I Like the Way You Think - 10 Simple Ways to Get Students to Think Critically
Dr. Meg Delgato
Director, Curriculum and Student Success, College of Nursing

Participants will have the opportunity to investigate ways to help students learn to think critically about content in the classroom. Discussion will include the importance of defining critical thinking and the significance of students as skilled participants in the art of critical thinking.

10 Ways to Help Students Think Critically

Asking the Right Questions: A Guide to Critical Thinking

Critical Thinking Definition

Measuring Critical Thinking in Management Soft Skills Courses
Drs. Lynn Grinnell & Frank Appunn
Professors, College of Business

Assessing critical thinking in soft skills courses is difficult because there is no single correct answer to soft skills problems. Professors are daunted by the prospect of more rigorous or frequent grading of essay quizzes, online discussions and papers. The purpose of this presentation is to provide a literature review on methods/best practices for assessing these soft skills. The presentation will address assessing online as well as classroom assignments. It would be applicable to business, ethics, government, communication, psychology, and sociology disciplines, among others.

Presentation

When it Counts - Critical Thinking in a Moral Context
David Monroe
QEC Faculty Chair & Professor of Applied Ethics

This session will focus on the relevance and importance of critical thinking in the context of ethical decision-making. In the course of this discussion, Dr. Monroe will elaborate on the model of moral reasoning taught in SPC's Applied Ethics courses and suggest that we encourage and foster such thinking in our students across curricula. The aim, of course, is helping our students prepare to think when it counts.

Handout
Teaching is Not a Solitary Process
Larry Goldsmith, Instructor-in-Charge, Parks and Leisure Services

The presentation highlights the magnitude of accomplishments that can be achieved only when talented people bring together their synergy and creativity. Resources and tools available to faculty for bringing creative thinking to the classroom will be explored. This session will outline an intervention designed to train students on how to assume ownership of the customer's experience. Learn how to use interventions and resources to teach your students how to make higher level decisions by applying critical thinking.

 
Incorporating Authentic Assessment in the Classroom
Dr. Jesse Coraggio
Director, Academic Effectiveness & Assessment and
Dr. Carol Weideman, Mathematics Professor

Is there an alignment between your classroom instruction and assessment? Are your students taught practical applications of material and then assessed using a multiple choice test? This presentation will review various types of classroom assessment practices with a specific focus on the creation and implementation of authentic assessment.

Presentation

Combating Aliens with Critical Thinking: Using Your Critical Thinking Skills
Dr. Michael Earle Social Science Professor &
Dr. Janice Thiel
Director, Quality Enhancement Plan

Many people who have grown tired of exotic pets have dumped them in the Everglades, and with no natural predators, these "aliens" have become a danger to native species. In this session you will put your critical thinking skills to work combating this dilemma by participating in an activity involving the six core elements: communication, analysis, problem-solving, evaluation, synthesis, and reflection. Come prepared to share your strategies for teaching for critical thinking.

The Art of Critical Thinking

Handouts

Presentation

Strategies to Get Students to Think Critically
Dr. Gail Lancaster
Clearwater Campus Librarian

How do you create a classroom environment that is conducive to critical thinking? How do you tweak your assignments so that students are given opportunities to think critically? How do you frame essential questions so that students think critically about the content? These questions and more will be addressed in this interactive presentation

 
Critical Thinking: Trial and Error
Dr. Cynthia Grey & Ginny Price
Veterinary Technology

Learn about critical thinking measurements and interventions. Presenters will discuss the outcomes of different methods for teaching critical thinking. Finally, they will share measurements they have used to identify success.

Price Presentation

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Critical Thinking Retreat 2011

Critical Thinking Retreat

The third annual retreat for faculty focusing on critical thinking was held on Friday, January 28 at the Natural Habitat Park & Environmental Center at the Seminole Campus. The event was attended by 25 faculty members and staff, and included a Faculty Champion Sharing Session featuring Cynthia Grey, Steven Hardt, Larry Goldsmith, and Ginny Price. David Monroe, faculty for the Applied Ethics Program, presented on the importance of critical thinking for SPC students. Gail Lancaster, Faculty Chair of the Quality Enhancement Committee, reviewed the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) and provided an overview of the first step in the SoTL process – the Literature Review. Events like the Critical Thinking Retreat and Institutes help bring SPC closer to fulfilling the initiatives of the Quality Enhancement Plan aimed at improving learning for our students.

2011 Critical Thinking Retreat Agenda

 

Critical Thinking
David Monroe
Ethics Professor

Scholarship of Teaching & Learning
Gail Lancaster
Librarian and QEC Faculty Chair

Repiratory Care
Steven Hardt
Faculty
   

 

Message from Kay Burniston...

Habitat Park

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Fall Critical Thinking Institute 2010

2010 Fall CTI Banner

Critical Thinking Institute for Teaching and Learning
Communicating as Learners to Promote Critical Thinking

Co-Sponsored by Web and Instructional Technology Services
In partnership with the Center of Excellence for Teaching and Learning

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Dean Kohrs

Date: Friday, September 24, 2010
Time: 8:00 a.m. - 12:40 p.m.
Location: Caruth Health Education Center, Directions

Review the Agenda and topics for the Faculty Champion Sharing Session

St. Petersburg College marked its third annual Fall Critical Thinking Institute by more than doubling attendance from the event held two years ago, and by increasing attendance 30 percent from last year. Besides enjoying a steady rise to 130 participants, this year’s institute, held at the Caruth Health Education Center (HEC) on September 24, boasted other “firsts,” including the addition of a keynote presentation by SPJC graduate, SPC adjunct, national speaker, and Hacking College author, Dr. Dean Kohrs. Comments received from the event evaluation about Dr. Kohrs included, “Central to his message was an effort to engage the audience, to loosen old patterns of thinking, to strike a chord of excitement,” and, “Enjoyable, useful in dealing with today's student population, and very timely in this age of technological gadgets.” All who responded to the evaluation indicated they plan to attend future institutes; the next being the Narrowing the Gulf Conference on March 31 and April 1. There was an infusion of telecommunications technology and instructional technology-focused break-out sessions thanks to co-sponsorship with the Web and Instructional Technology Services Department. And, the newly-formed Center of Excellence for Teaching and Learning partnered to provide additional break-out sessions on critical thinking. Faculty Champions, many from the allied health fields housed at HEC were on-hand to share how they are teaching for critical thinking.

Opening Session

Provost's Welcome
Dr. Phil Nicotera

Keynote Presentation
Dr. Dean Kohrs

Presentation

President's Address
Dr. Bill Law

Sharing Session Overview
Mary Hanlon, B.A., PTA

Presentation

WITS Presentation
Nancy Munce & Alan Shapiro

Presentation

Break-Out Sessions

Lynn Grinnell

The Value of Reflection to Critical Thinking and Learning
Lynn Grinnell, PhD, CETL Transition Team Member & Professor, College of Business

This presentation uses a "lesson within a lesson" approach to learning on two levels: identifying learning activities that will encourage students to transfer learning to new situations, and using structured experiential activities and debriefings to encourage students to think critically.

Presentation

Christy Powers

Briefing a Case: An Essential Task for Paralegal
Dr. Christy A. Powers, CETL Committee Member & Professor College of Policy and Legal Studies

The process of the case briefing is an essential task in the legal profession. It facilitates critical thinking skills across the Paralegal Studies curriculum. Thus far, the incorporation of this reusable learning activity into the classes has proved to be excellent for development of the student's critical thinking skills. Come view how this process was developed and incorporated as an effective learning tool.

Karen Fritch

Using Technology to Communicate Feedback to Learners
Karen Fritch, Instructional Design Technologist

An important piece of critical thinking is the reevaluating that happens as learners receive feedback on concepts and products. A potential barrier for that feedback for online faculty is not having the tools to create effective and efficient feedback. Giving timely, quality feedback enhances the chances for success and satisfaction for the learner. You will be exposed to a variety of ways you can use online tools to provide more effective and efficient feedback to students.

Presentation: prezi.com/secure/96f5770ccbca178c5f54689314aa5ff8e8a481af/

Tim Godcharles

Taking the Grrr out of Groupwork
Timothy Godcharles, Instructional Design Technologist

Instructional success is dependent on generating student interaction. Interdependent collaboration actively engages students, stimulates higher-order thinking and helps students clarify ideas through discussion and debate. In this session, participants will learn how to use group structures in conjunction with online collaborative tools that help foster interaction among students.

Presentation: prezi.com/secure/96fbc4b7283f32f1d5cf8b42e4aeb2d2c45c3f14/

Nancy Munce and Alan Shapiro

Harnessing the Power of Mobile Technology in Your Classroom
Nancy Munce & Alan Shapiro, Instructional Design Technologists

With each new generation of learners come new attitudes, new challenges and new technologies. So, what's the tool du jour? Cell phones. 80 percent of Americans own them. Many instructors loathe them because of their potential disruptiveness the classroom. You will learn how to turn these often irritating devices into positive tools of student engagement and active learning.

Handout
Presentation: prezi.com/v3iyjxjvojn0/harnessing-the-power-of-mobile-technology-in-your-classroom/

Faculty Champion Sharing Session

Sharing Session
Faculty Champions

Faculty Champions and their Academic Roundtable members will describe the critical thinking strategies they are currently employing with their students. There will be a timed rotation from table-to-table to enable you to quickly glean the main concepts from multiple disciplines/programs in brief “speed-dating” fashion. For more specific details about the critical thinking initiative, please attend the “Embarking…” session at the end of the day.

Handout
Vet Tech AS Critical Thinking Grid

Janice Thiel

Embarking on the Critical Thinking Initiative in 2011
Dr. Gail Lancaster, QEC Faculty Chair & Librarian, St. Petersburg/Gibbs Campus
Dr. Janice Thiel, QEP Director & SACS Accreditation Liaison

If you are from a discipline that has not yet participated in the critical thinking initiative, this session is for you because your program is on-deck to begin in January. Others are also welcome to attend this brief information session.

Presentation

WITS Logo

CETL Logo

Dr. Dean Kohrs is the author of Hacking College. He has a PhD in American Culture Studies from Bowling Green State University. He has taught at Community Colleges, Liberal Arts Colleges and State Research Universities. Dr. Kohrs spends most of his days as a national speaker and consultant addressing globalization, student and institutional success.

Our campuses and our students are saturated with various iGadgets. But, can our students use these technologies to communicate effectively, solve problems, and think critically? Perhaps more importantly, can they critically think about these technologies and the cultural shifts they are creating? Is SPC developing a broad institutional pedagogy that engages students to inquire about these issues? Since their creation, a chief mission of colleges and universities has been to shape graduates with a more sophisticated and empowered means of navigating the cultural landscape. “Internet everywhere” now dominates the cultural landscape. The success of our students and institution is significantly tied to their ability to navigate this emerging cultural landscape.

Dr. Dean Kohrs

 

Twitter Logo

The Critical Thinking Institute utilized *Twitter to enhance communication amongst attendees. Participants posted and followed Critical Thinking Institute tweets by using the **hashtag #CTI0910. Participants contributed to the conversation via text message by sending a text to 87884 and starting the message with @wif34088 (Standard text messaging rates apply). In order to view messages sent via Twitter AND text, go to this page http://it.spcollege.edu/it/blog/?p=396.

*What's Twitter? - Learn more and sign up for a free account at: twitter.com

**What's a hashtag? - Twitter lets you use hashtags as search terms to start and/or follow a conversation. If you're having a conversation on Twitter with another person about #avocados, simply include the hashtag #avocados in your message. Other people interested in #avocados can jump in. You can also use that hashtag to review the conversation later.

 

SPOC Session with Dr. Dean Kohrs The QEP Team, Dr. Dean Kohrs, and the Instructional Design Technologists (formally, Instructional Technologists) discussed plans for the upcoming institute.
(via SPOC on 6/14/10)

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Dr. Milton Cox - April 14-15, 2010

Dr. Milton Cox

Dr. Milton Cox is a national speaker and an expert in the field of learning communities, tying in directly to our critical thinking initiative which employs Academic Roundtables to improve the learning experience for our students. He will address the usefulness of faculty learning communities for solving problems and strategies to encourage active-learner-centered teaching, an important approach to promote critical thinking in the classroom.

Dr. Cox is Associate Director of the Center for the Enhancement of Learning and Teaching at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. He founded and directs the Lilly Conference on College Teaching, is founder and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal on Excellence in College Teaching, and facilitates the Hesburgh Award-winning Teaching Scholars faculty learning community. Dr. Cox is project director of a FIPSE grant establishing faculty learning community programs on other campuses and is co-editor of the book Building Faculty Learning Communities (Jossey-Bass). He incorporates the use of student learning portfolios and Howard Gardner's concept of multiple intelligences in his mathematics classes. He is recipient of the C.C. MacDuffee Award for distinguished service to Pi Mu Epsilon, the national mathematics honorary, and a certificate of special achievement from the Professional and Organizational Development Network in Higher Education in recognition and appreciation of notable contributions to the profession of faculty, instructional, and organizational development.

Dr. Cox gave two presentations at the Seminole Campus Conference Center, located in close proximity to the library, Directions

An Introduction to Faculty Learning Communities: Utilizing FLCs to Solve Problems and Seize Opportunities
Wednesday, April 14, 1:00-3:30 p.m.
Community is often missing in higher education, where connections across disciplines and institutional units are overlooked. Faculty and professional learning communities (FLCs) help establish these connections and achieve most of the outcomes of student learning communities: increased interest in learning, retention, active learning, rate of intellectual development, and civic contributions to the common good. The faculty learning community movement has its roots in future, new, junior, mid-career, and senior faculty’s desire for community, transdisciplinarity, and support for investigation and implementation of new teaching and learning approaches and opportunities. Dr. Cox's PowerPoint presentation (pdf)

Strategies, Practices, and Evidence to Encourage and Facilitate Active-Learner-Centered Teaching
Thursday, April 15, 1:00-3:30 p.m.
It has been 13 years since Barr and Tagg called upon higher education to move from the instruction paradigm to the learning paradigm. In this session, an overview of active and student-centered learning and their connections to the learning paradigm was provided. Also cited was research that provided evidence for the effectiveness of active learning and resources that aided its development as a teaching approach. Dr. Cox's PowerPoint presentation (pdf)

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Spring Critical Thinking Institute & Narrowing the Gulf Conference 2010

2010 Spring Critical Thinking Institute Banner

The Spring Critical Thinking Institute was held in conjunction with the eleventh annual Narrowing the Gulf Conference on March 18 and 19 at the EpiCenter. Approximately 170 attended from SPC and other institutions throughout Florida including FSU, HCC, Miami Dade College, UCF, USF, and Valencia Community College. Attendees also came from as far away as California, Canada, Georgia, Idaho, Maryland, and New Jersey.

Barry Stein

Dr. Barry S. Stein, who is the chairperson and professor of psychology at Tennessee Technological University conducted the keynote presentation. Dr. Stein is also the principal investigator on the NSF funded Center for Assessment and Improvement of Learning at TTU. The center has received continued funding from the National Science Foundation for the development and national dissemination of a unique instrument to assess critical thinking that directly involves faculty in the evaluation of students’ critical thinking and problem solving skills. This instrument is currently used by a broad range of institutions across the U.S. as part of broader efforts to improve student learning.

Dr. Stein received his Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University (1977) in cognitive psychology and has authored and coauthored numerous articles on learning, problem solving, and critical thinking throughout his career. He is coauthor of the Ideal Problem Solver: A Guide for Improving Thinking, Learning and Creativity. Dr. Stein is a frequent speaker at national conferences on assessment and accreditation.

The presentation examined the importance of critical thinking in higher education and in our general society. It also highlighted the importance of these skills for under-represented groups (e.g., minorities and individuals with disabilities). The presentation discussed the need to assess and improve these skills, and the kinds of learning activities that have been found to positively affect these skills. The presentation also examined the importance of infusing the development of these skills throughout the curriculum. Dr. Stein's PowerPoint presentation

Following his keynote, Dr. Stein met with the QEP Faculty Champions focused on the critical thinking initiative, sharing his insights about assessing critical thinking and fielding questions about strategies for improving critical thinking skills. The conference also featured a track of critical thinking breakout sessions, including: “Perceptions of Critical Thinking – Is Critical Thinking Important to Employers and Employees,” “Improving Student Critical Thinking Skills Using Google Tools,” “Top 10 Classroom Strategies to Get Your Students to Think,” and “Asking the Right Questions: A Guide to Critical Thinking." Conference Program

Break-out sessions focused on critical thinking:

A Rubric for Moral Reasoning: Critical Thinking in Ethics Applied 6.0
David Monroe
Ethics Department
This session will present and elaborate on the rubric for moral decision-making described in Ethics Applied 6.0, the textbook for St. Petersburg College’s Applied Ethics courses. This method of moral reasoning can be a powerful tool in helping students face ethical challenges, as it makes available to them a systematic model of critical thinking. Handout
Perceptions of Critical Thinking - is Critical thinking important to employers and employees - an EMS Example
Dr. Dave Sullivan
Program Director/Coordinator, EMS/CME
Critical thinking has evolved and is becoming a standard of care. A 2009 doctoral dissertation sought to explore what EMS employers and employees thought about critical thinking and whether EMS education programs adequately prepared students to think critically. The ability to think critically has become a highly desirable skill and students desire student-centered activities that will teach them to navigate the real-world situations they will encounter in the workplace. This presentation reviews the dissertation’s key points and provides participants with practical approaches to teaching critical thinking skills.

Presentation

Article

Engaging Students with Power Point Presentations
Richard Mercadante
Professor, Communications
This presentation will explore new research and innovative ideas for engaging students with PowerPoint. After examining the common abuses of PowerPoint, practical tips will be offered to enhance student engagement.  
Symposium on Developing an Instructional Portfolio
Dr. Bonnie Jefferis
Professor, Communications
Dr. Sarah Moseley
Professor of Nursing, RN to BSN Program
St. Petersburg College has undertaken an initiative to enhance student learning by improving students’ ability to think critically. Groups of faculty have formed Academic Roundtables that employ the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning model to determine what teaching methodologies are successful at improving critical thinking. In this session, selected faculty will present their projects designed to increase students’ critical thinking, and will suggest ways in which other faculty/classes/disciplines can use this information in their own classes.
Instructional Portfolios
Top 10 Classroom Strategies to Get Your Students to Think
Dr. Gail Lancaster
Faculty Chair & St. Petersburg/Gibbs Campus Librarian
Dr. Janice Thiel
Director, Quality Enhancement Plan
Teaching for critical thinking can be a challenge. This presentation will teach techniques known to foster critical thinking, including engaged lecturing, modeling thinking and effective questioning. Lancaster and Thiel will model techniques throughout the session and encourage active participation. Comparable strategies for teaching online will be included.

Presentation

Handout

Outline

Asking the Right Questions: A Guide to Critical Thinking
Dr. Meg Delgato
Director, Curriculum and Student Success, College of Nursing
This presentation is based on content from the highly popular text “Asking the Right Questions: A Guide to Critical Thinking” by Browne and Keeley (2009). Participants will have the chance to experience ways to bridge the gap between simply memorizing or blindly accepting information and the greater challenge of critical analysis and synthesis. Participants will also learn about Browne and Keeley’s model that teaches students to respond to alternative points of view and develop a solid foundation for making personal choices about what to accept and reject. Books with Accompanying Resources Online
Mastering the Art of Writing Objective Test Items
Dr. Jesse Coraggio
Director, Academic Effectiveness & Assessment
Looking to improve your test item-writing skills? Concerned about your multiple-choice test questions and whether your students are learning the content or are just good test takers? The presentation will explain how to create effective multiple-choice test questions. The presentation will provide item-writing guidelines as well as best practices to prevent students from just guessing the correct answers. Presentation
Utilizing Graphic Organizers to Infuse Critical Thinking into Content Areas
Dr. Nancy Watkins
College of Education
The presentation will address various ways to utilize graphic organizers to teach critical thinking in content areas.

OneStop on SPC Network:

\\onestop\spjc_pc\Licensed_Software\Critcal Thinking Infusion

Improving Student Critical Thinking Skills Using Google Tools
Karen Hesting
Instructional Technologist, Clearwater Campus & EpiCenter
Nancy Munce
Instructional Technologist, St. Petersburg/Gibbs Campus
When most people hear the word “Google” they immediately think of a search engine. Google, however, is much more. Session participants will learn how Google tools can be implemented to support a variety of critical thinking instructional strategies. This session will focus on technologies for online and blended courses. Handout

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Retreat for Academic Roundtables 2010

ART Beach Retreat Collage

The second annual retreat for Academic Roundtables (ARTs) focusing on critical thinking was held on Friday, January 29 at the Civitan Beach Club on Redington Shores Beach. The event was attended by 33 faculty members and staff, and included a Faculty Champion Sharing Session featuring Bonnie Jefferis, Christy Powers, Cathy King, Sarah Moseley, Holly Hoopes, and Chad Mairn.

Magaly Tymms, Coordinator of Academic Programs, Research and Reports, presented the SPC-developed Assessment Rubric for Critical Thinking (ARC) and results from the scoring workshop held in November. Janice Thiel, Director of the Quality Enhancement Plan and Gail Lancaster, Faculty Chair of the Quality Enhancement Committee, reviewed the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL), which is the guiding model that the ARTs follow to compile Instructional Portfolios to document their efforts to improve their students' ability to think critically.

Faculty new to the critical thinking initiative were provided guidance on how to conduct the Literature Review, which is the first step of the SoTL process. And, musical entertainment during the potluck luncheon was provided by Greg Rabelo and Martha Campbell.

2010 ART Beach Retreat Agenda

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Fall Critical Thinking Institute 2009

Karen Kaufman White

Institute Draws Over 100

The Fall Critical Thinking Institute held at the St. Petersburg/Gibbs Campus on Friday, October 9, 2009 was attended by over 100 faculty and staff. The opening General Session featured a warm welcome from Provost Karen Kaufman White, followed by an enlightening presentation by QEP Faculty Chair Gail Lancaster on the value of critical thinking. The General Session also included a Faculty Champion panel discussion moderated by SGA President Leja Apple. Faculty Champions, Holly Hoopes, Sarah Moseley, Cathy King, Chad Mairn, and Bonnie Jefferis outlined their endeavors to improve learning, and they relayed their insights about teaching for critical thinking. Questions were fielded from the audience.

Later in the morning, participants chose from a variety of presentations to attend during the two 45-minute break-out sessions. The topics included: Library Support, Nursing’s Perspective, Critical Thinking Assessment Test, Graphic Organizers, Jing, Paralegal Case Briefing, Text Books & Critical Thinking, Google Documents, and the Assessment Rubric for Critical Thinking in Ethics. An optional information session was offered to the disciplines slated to begin the critical thinking initiative in January. If you missed this event, consider attending the break-out session that will present institute highlights at the upcoming Professional Development Day on October 23. View the original Fall Critical Thinking Institute Agenda or review the topics and handouts below:

Gail Lancaster Why Critical Thinking?
Dr. Gail Lancaster
Faculty Chair & St. Petersburg/Gibbs Campus Librarian

Patrick Awuah on Educating Leaders

Leja Apple and Faculty Champions

Faculty Champion Panel Discussion
Moderated by Leja Apple, SGA President

Panel:
Dr. Holly Hoopes – Academic Chair, Business Technologies
Dr. Sarah Moseley – Professor of Nursing
Dr. Cathy King – Professor of Nursing
Mr. Chad Mairn – Librarian, St. Petersburg/Gibbs Campus
Dr. Bonnie Jefferis – Professor, Communications

 
Chad Mairn

SPC Libraries – Supporting Critical Thinking Across the Curriculum with Library Resources and Services
Chad Mairn
St. Petersburg/Gibbs Librarian

Library Resources

LINCCWeb Toolbar

Using LINCCWeb

Direct link to download library toolbar

Installing in Firefox video tutorial

Linking directly to articles tool

Cathy King and Sarah Moseley

THINKING! It is Critical to Your Health – from Nursing's Perspective!
Dr. Cathy King, RN, CCRN
Professor of Nursing, ADN Program
Dr. Sarah Moseley
Professor of Nursing, RN to BSN Program

Nursing Presentation
Carol Weideman and Faculty Panel

Critical Thinking Assessment Test (CAT): Overview and Panel Discussion
Dr. Carol Weideman
Professor, Mathematics, St. Petersburg/Gibbs Campus

Panel:
Dr. Holly Hoopes – Academic Chair, Business Technologies
Jane Till – Acting Director, Applied Ethics Department and Applied Ethics Institute
Darlene Westberg – Professor, Business Technologies

CAT Presentation
Nancy Watkins Utilizing Graphic Organizers to Teach Critical Thinking in the Content Areas
Dr. Nancy Watkins
College of Education

OneStop on SPC Network:

\\onestop\spjc_pc\Licensed_Software\Critcal Thinking Infusion

Darlene Westberg, Michael Gordon, and Holly Hoopes

Creating RLOs using Jing
Darlene Westberg and Michael Gordon
Business Technologies Instructors
Dr. Holly Hoopes
Academic Chair, Business Technologies

Jing Welcome Guide
Susan Demers Briefing a Case: An Essential Task for Paralegals
Dr. Christy A. Powers
Paralegal Studies Instructor
(via video facilitated by Dr. Susan Demers)
Gail Lancaster Critically Thinking about Critical Thinking Exercises
Gail Lancaster
Faculty Chair & St. Petersburg/Gibbs Campus Librarian
Sample Questions
Ann McNicol Using Google Documents to Enhance Online Discourse and Collaboration
Ann McNicol
College of Education
Google Docs Presentation
Lee Miller An Application of the Assessment Rubric for Critical Thinking (ARC) to the Ethics Critical Thinking Application Paper (CTAP)
Dr. Lee A. Miller and David Monroe
Ethics Department
 

Dental Hygiene
Emergency Medical Services
Funeral Services
Health Information Management
Hospitality & Tourism Management
Human Services
Medical Laboratory Technology
Natural Science
Orthotics & Prosthetics
Parks & Leisure Services
Physical Therapist Assistant
Radiography
Respiratory Care
Veterinary Technology

Embarking on the Critical Thinking Initiative in 2010
Dr. Janice Thiel
Director, Quality Enhancement Plan

Presentation

Instructional Portfolios

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Spring Critical Thinking Institute & Narrowing the Gulf Conference 2009

2009 Narrowing the Gulf Banner

The Tenth Annual Narrowing the Gulf Conference, with a focus on critical thinking was held at the EpiCenter on March 26 and 27. Dr. David Sousa, author of How the Brain Learns, was one of the keynote speakers. Dr. Sousa also conducted two workshops on critical thinking. The conference hosted a number of discipline-specific workshops facilitated by people who are experts in critical thinking in their fields. View the conference brochure for more information.

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Retreat for Academic Roundtables 2009

ART Beach Retreat Photo of Participants and Activities

The first annual retreat for Academic Round Tables (ARTs) focusing on critical thinking was held on Friday, January 30 at the Civitan Beach Club on Redington Shores Beach. The event was attended by 35 faculty members and staff, and featured presentations by Gail Lancaster, Carol Weideman, Lynn Grinnell, Jesse Coraggio, and Janice Thiel on “Learning Communities,” “Assessment,” “Instructional Portfolios,” “Assessment Rubric for Critical Thinking (ARC),” and “Faculty Champion Guide” respectively.

During the morning session, Faculty Champions and ART members from Early Childhood, the College of Education, Ethics, and Student Life Skills reflected on the past year’s efforts and began drafting a Portfolio Report. Faculty Champions and ART members from Business Technologies, the College of Nursing, Communication, Library, and Paralegal spent the afternoon session gearing up for the year ahead, particularly the completion of an Instructional Portfolio for their discipline.

ART Beach Retreat Agenda

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Fall Critical Thinking Institute 2008

Fall CTI Banner

The Fall Critical Thinking Institute held at the Downtown Center on November 14 was a successful event, by all accounts. Ninety faculty and staff registered for the event, which included twelve break-out sessions on topics ranging from conference reports and critical thinking activities presented by Faculty Champions, to hands-on technology workshops conducted by Instructional Technologists, to working subcommittee meetings.

Yvonne Ulmer, Executive Officer of the Downtown Center, ushered in the General Session, providing an overview of the Downtown Center with its 55 full-time and adjunct instructors, 1,500 students, and excess of 100 classes each term. The Downtown Center is the home of the Florida Orchestra, Florida International Museum, and the historic Palladium.

Anne Cooper announced the recent transition of QEP director, and expressed appreciation for Lynn Grinnell and her excellent work during the inaugural year of implementation. Dr. Cooper introduced Janice Thiel as the new Director of the Quality Enhancement Plan. Drs. Grinnell and Thiel are working closely together on a regular basis to ensure a smooth transition.

The remainder of the General Session provided an opportunity for each of the Faculty Champions to outline her/his break-out session so that attendees could choose a topic of interest to learn more about. Jesse Coraggio, the Director for Institutional Research and Effectiveness, gave a summary of the Assessment Rubric for Critical Thinking (ARC), which he later instructed in more detail during his break-out session.

Most participants opted to join in the luncheon at Grille 121, a short walk from the Downtown Center, where they enjoyed a delicious, yet reasonably priced entree. Afterwards, members of the various subcommittees reconvened at the Downtown Center to finish off the afternoon. For example, the Student Success Subcommittee focused on the Instructional Portfolio which is the culminating deliverable of each Academic Round Table (ART), and the mechanism which will relay all that was accomplished by the ART to improve the ability of students to think critically.

When asked what was the most important or valuable thing learned at the Fall Critical Thinking Institute, one participant said, "Talking about specific techniques that will be useful in creating a lesson plan, activities for instruction, and improving current lessons to document critical thinking practices."

Fall Critical Thinking Institute Agenda

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Summer Critical Thinking Institute 2008

In the summer, SPC held a CTI "retreat" with in-house assessment and technology experts, which was filled to the 80-seat capacity. In addition, the fifteen full-time and adjunct faculty members and QEP staff involved in the CAT scoring session (see Student Success Initiative, above) determined overwhelmingly that the experience was an outstanding professional development activity and the QEP team recommended to QEP senior leadership that it be considered a professional development activity in line with CTIs. Finally, SPC developed ten "courselets," short, online modules providing instruction and examples for a variety of instructional strategies shown in research to develop students' ability to think critically.

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Spring Critical Thinking Institute 2008

We were very excited to bring two world-class speakers to SPC for the first Critical Thinking Institute this Spring.  The Critical Thinking Institute consists of a series of workshops for faculty and staff on (1) critical thinking, (2) teaching for critical thinking, (3) assessing critical thinking, and (4) using technology for critical thinking. For notes from the sessions, go to the Critical Thinking Community Group on the ANGEL Training server.

The first two workshops will be conducted by Dr. L. Dee Fink, author of Creating Significant Learning Experiences and frequent presenter at the SACS Summer Institute, and Dr. Gerald Nosich, author of Learning to Think Things Through and primary presenter for the Foundation for Critical Thinking.  Both are nationally-known experts in their field.